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Guatemala Deports McAfee To the US 141

Posted by Soulskill
from the every-bond-film-has-to-end-some-time dept.
Reuters reports that John McAfee's troubles in Central America seem to be coming to an end. After a Guatemalan judge ordered McAfee's release yesterday, the country's immigration authorities have now deported him, putting him on a plane to Miami this afternoon. McAfee told ABC News, "They took me out of my cell and put me on a freaking airplane. I had no choice in the matter." Which is not to say he's unhappy with the outcome: "It was the most gracious expulsion I've ever experienced. Compared to my past two wives that expelled me this isn't a terrible trip."
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Guatemala Deports McAfee To the US

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  • by Smallpond (221300) on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @07:34PM (#42266939) Homepage Journal

    At least for people who aren't billionaires.

    • by MightyYar (622222)

      Don't they actually need to charge him with something?

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        They didnt need to "charge" Assange with anything... he's just wanted for questioning.

        • by MightyYar (622222)

          Which would be a relevant comment if McAfee were in the UK.

      • by Smallpond (221300)

        You mean like being wanted for questioning in a murder?

        • by Capsaicin (412918) *

          You mean like being wanted for questioning in a murder?

          No he means actually charge him with something. The traditional common law position is that, the terms of the extradition treaty notwithstanding, a person can only be extradited if charged with a crime recognised as such in the extraditing country. The US has not, I trust, entered into any treaties whereby it is subject to the perversion of law which has seen Sweden demand the rendition of a UK resident merely for the purposes of interrogation.

          • by Darinbob (1142669)

            "Common law" is not that common. What we have is a shared legal history with England, but that is completely unrelated to the legal history of many other countries.

            • by Capsaicin (412918) *

              If there was any relevant point to that post at all, I missed it.

              • I suspect his point was that if your logic held, there wouldn't be many extradition treaties as they'd be pretty one sided if they relied upon a system of law not present in the vast majority of bound parties. So there has to be more to it than you suggest.
                • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

                  by Capsaicin (412918) *

                  I suspect his point was that if your logic held

                  Its not my logic dude, it's the Law.

                  there wouldn't be many extradition treaties as they'd be pretty one sided if they relied upon a system of law not present in the vast majority of bound parties. So there has to be more to it than you suggest.

                  Now that is a failure of logic! The mere fact that the dual criminality (AKA 'double criminality) [uslegal.com] principle exists in common law countries, does not imply that the same principle is absent in other legal systems. Y

                • by Arker (91948)
                  No, if that was his logic he's just dense. Even though there are fundamentally distinct legal traditions with very different answers to certain questions, the vast majority of actions that are a crime in one jurisdiction will still constitute a crime in a different jurisdiction. Laws against theft and murder for instance are effectively universal, and with modern treaties even tertiary legislation such as copyright tends to be pretty darn uniform.
          • by hairyfeet (841228)

            Not to mention everybody seems to be ignoring some pretty relevant facts about the case. 1.-The cops talked to Assange before he left, said there was no reason to hold him, 2.- Both girls said it was NOT rape, in fact one actually went out while he was asleep and bought him breakfast and then had sex with him again after he ate, 3.- There is NOTHING in Swedish law that says you have to question anybody only on Swedish soil, in fact there are several cases on record where Swedish police have questioned peopl

      • Unless he was claiming refugee status, Guatemala was under no obligation to let him stay within their borders.

      • by slew (2918) on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @08:44PM (#42267611)

        Apparently yes [internatio...onblog.com]..

        3. A request for extradition of a person who is sought for prosecution shall also be supported by:
        (a) a copy of the warrant or order of arrest, if any, issued by a judge or other competent authority of the Requesting State;
        (b) a document setting forth the charges; and
        (c) such evidence as would be found sufficient, according to the law of the Requested State, to justify the committal for trial of the person sought if the offense of which the person has been accused had been committed in the Requested State.

      • he requested asylum in Guatemala, that was denied, so he gets deported to his country of citizenship: the USA

        what happens next is he will probably be extradited to Belize for murder, when the Belize govt present the USA with an extradition order

    • by paazin (719486) on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @07:53PM (#42267131)
      He's not a billionaire. Not even close; apparently he's worth something more in the lines of 4 mil, if that.

      I'd figure that's small enough that no one would care in tossing him back over.
      • Not even close; apparently he's worth something more in the lines of 4 mil, if that.

        Somebody else said his retirement buyout was along the lines of $80M. But, I can see him having spent $76M on coke and whores - just hadn't seen that documented anywhere.

        • Well, coke, whores, and the market crash some years back.

        • by sosume (680416)

          IIRC he put all his money in toxic assets such as CDO's, right before the markets crashed. So he's probably down to his last million.

      • He's a Belizean Billionaire, if he was a real Billionaire he'd still be in America.
        • 1 Belize dollar = 2 U.S. dollars, so he's not a billionaire there either.

          But if you meant that he could live a billionaire lifestyle in Belize with just a few million U.S. dollars, I'd agree.
        • by Wolfrider (856)

          " MORONIE DEPORTED TO SWEDEN

          CLAIMS HE'S NOT FROM THERE " ;-)

          / obscure? now i have to post some random stuff here to get around the filter

    • Extradition only matters when you have proof someone is a criminal.

      The whole issue of Belize wanting McAfee from the start was a farce; he didn't pay his protection money and they wanted to hurt/kill him. End of story.

      The proof of this will to be seen in nothing whatsoever happening to McAfee on his return to the U.S. They have no proof against him and can't request to extradite someone just because he made them look like fools.

      The whole story is a cautionary tale about living in places where corruption of

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        >The whole issue of Belize wanting McAfee from the start was a farce; he didn't pay his protection money and they wanted to hurt/kill him. End of story.
        Are you saying that the police killed his neighbor in order to frame him? I'm not saying that's impossible, I just hadn't heard that theory.

        • Are you saying that the police killed his neighbor in order to frame him?

          To me it seems more likely than McAfee having done so. There was nothing about McAfee that indicated he was violent.

          Or it could have been some random crime. But it follows in line with McAfee's dog being shot.

          • He does, however, have a history of using drugs that cause strange, frequently violent, behavior in those who take it.
            • Oh for the love of @!$&. Overrated? WTF?

              The drug I'm refering to is "bath salts". These have been in the news lately because of some bizarre violent side effects, such as one victim literally eating another person's face off. McAfee has made it clear on countless occasions that he takes that drug.

              McAfee may be completely innocent, but quite honestly, this "Belize is the most corrupt country on Earth and McAfee has never done anything at all that would suggest he's capable of killing people" thing i

          • Why am I getting flashbacks to all the guys on here saying Hans Reiser was innocent, were you one of them?
          • Are you saying that the police killed his neighbor in order to frame him?

            To me it seems more likely than McAfee having done so.

            I also have no history of violence, but it someone killed my dog, they would die. Particularly if I lived in a place where money can erase crime (a fact McAfee seems to have over-estimated regarding Belize).

        • by X0563511 (793323)

          I think it more likely it was convenient for them to blame him for it.

          "Hey, we have this dead guy. We don't want to work. Hey, his neighbor told us to eat shit the other day... why don't we just throw it on him?"

        • by Arker (91948)
          Keep in mind that the official story is he is NOT a suspect in the murder of the neighbor. Supposedly the cops in Belize just want to interview him as a witness. If there was any evidence to implicate him, dont you think they would file charges instead of issuing the equivelant of a material witness warrant?
      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        No, he most likely killed someone and is trying to fool everyone into thinking it's political. There is a chance he's merely a raving lunatic who actually didn't kill his neighbor, but there is essentially ZERO chance that the government killed his neighbor just to set him up.

        Different countries have different legals systems and different ways to formally charge someone. In the US McAfee would have been charged already even though the investigation was not fully completed, but Belize may have a legal syst

        • by tsotha (720379)
          Or they just may not have enough evidence. If they don't have a witness or physical evidence all they're left with is the suspicion that a drug-addled nut took a conflict with his neighbor too far.
          • by Darinbob (1142669)

            It's still enough of a suspicion to want to question him. If the US does not extradite him or allow questioning on US soil, then McAfee has essentially purchased legal freedoms that average citizens can not.

      • The whole issue of Belize wanting McAfee from the start was a farce; he didn't pay his protection money and they wanted to hurt/kill him. End of story.

        The proof of this will to be seen in nothing whatsoever happening to McAfee on his return to the U.S. They have no proof against him and can't request to extradite someone just because he made them look like fools.

        The whole story is a cautionary tale about living in places where corruption of the government is rampant.

        If corrupt Belize government officials are behind this couldn't they just, you know, fake some evidence? Witnesses, forensics, etc.

    • US has extradition treaty with Belize

      He wasn't extradited, he was deported.

    • by HiThere (15173)

      You have things a bit backwards. Belize is the country that was charging him with a crime. They're expelling him as an undesireable person. Extradition would only come into it if he were in the US and Belize wanted him handed over.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @07:55PM (#42267149)

    The public's cynical reaction to Mcafee is strong proof that we need "innocent until guilty," protection now more than ever in this world.

    If you presume innocence for a moment, the things that have been happening to Mcafee look like tragedies that no one would wish on any human being.

    Last I checked being strange doesn't automatically make you guilty of a crime.

    Let's check the facts; Belize authorities have said they don't suspect him of being involved in the crime, there is no warrant for his arrest, and that they just want to question him. However, they were willing to go so far as to demand his extradition from Guatemala and get Interpol involved. And, if you watch the interview of Mcafee on youtube where he is being arrested, the Interpol agents all turned away in shame and faced away from the camera man. If this doesn't sound fishy to anyone else, I'm at a loss of words.

    Something isn't right here. And, I for one feel bad for this man and what he has had to endure.

    Also, he's not a billionaire, and never was.

    And, various folks on forums and youtube are angry at his antivirus and saying it's good that this is happening to him because of their personal vendettas against his software. I'd like to point out he left the company in 1994 before Windows 95 came out, while the application was still on running on Microsoft DOS. For you kids who aren't aware, Mcafee antivirus was one of the best antivirus softwares available for DOS at the time. The fact that current management (Intel) drove the AV maker into the ground has nothing to do with the original founder. And, his character shouldn't be prematurely judged for your personal experiences with that piece of software.

    Regarding, his drug habits, he's admitted to these but explained that he's been clean for more than a decade now. This may or may not be true, but it has nothing to do the extradition requests from Belize. Also, various forums are accusing him of being a coke head but he wasn't, he was experimenting with bath salts. He discovered that the form that he had invented on Belize make women sexually excited, hence the large group of women that were interested in him. If anything, this guy might have discovered a cure for frigidity.

    Perform some research yourself on this guy and his predicament before you write vitriol or slander about him. If it were me in the same situation, I wouldn't want to be crucified by the public like he has been.

    • He's innocent until proven guilty in the eyes of the law. That doesn't mean I have to or necessarily should assume he's innocent. Sorry, but fleeing to the border raises my eyebrows. On the other hand, he seems to be paranoid, so there's a chance that he fled even though he is innocent. But I don't have to presume innocence when evaluating the situation because I'm not acting as a juror.
      • Sorry, but fleeing to the border raises my eyebrows.

        If you really thought the police were going to kill you, why would you ever let them hold you? In fact the only logical action would be to leave the country by any means possible.

        To me his leaving the border does not make it any more or less likely that he killed someone because it matches equally well with his theory they planned to kill him.

        Compounded with the fact that we know Belize has a fairly corrupt government and I find it lots easier to believe

        • by Klinky (636952)

          I think the part also about him faking the loss of this fortune and leaving the USA to avoid a wrongful death lawsuit also suggests that he is not terribly trustworthy.

        • by Darinbob (1142669)

          That theory that they plan to kill him is illogical. They could have killed him at any time. Why wait until someone else kills his neighbor before pouncing? If it was the government who did the killing then what's the point of killing his neighbor just to be able to kill McAfee later? Yes, McAfee is paranoid and unstable, so it does make sense that he'd run even if he wasn't he culprit. Belize isn't going to kill him though they do want to put him in jail.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        He's innocent until proven guilty in the eyes of the law. That doesn't mean I have to or necessarily should assume he's innocent.

        Except that it absolutely does, at least in the United States.

        We have a Republic, with elected officials, including some levels of law enforcement of judges, with other elected officials appointing those judges who aren't elected.

        If we the people throw innocent until proven guilty out the window, you can be damned sure our politicians will only pay lip service to it - and instead, appoint 'tough on crime' tools in lieu of impartial justices, all for the sake of getting our votes.

    • by Hentes (2461350)

      He is definitely guilty of running from justice.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      You've managed to paint a very rosy picture. I especially like claiming that he may have cured frigidity. Everything you said could possibly be true, but the alternative theory is MUCH simpler:

      1. He's a drug addict who's been out of touch with reality for a prolonged time
      2. He shot and killed his neighbor in some kind of argument (or perceived threat due to drug use and being paranoid)
      3. He fled the scene of the crime to avoid being charged with murder and going to jail

      We have murdering drug addicts doing

    • The guy tried to set himself up as some sort of Kurtzian hero loner out there in the jungle. His ramblings seem barely sane to me. Besides if the government was as corrupt as he implies he could have paid them off, instead he's going to lose everything he has there by fleeing trying to avoid being questioned?
    • the Interpol agents all turned away in shame

      That's an assumption on your part - not a fact. There is a difference.

    • by Revotron (1115029)

      Last I checked being strange doesn't automatically make you guilty of a crime.

      Oh, thank god! Whew. You had me nervous there for a second.

      I was afraid that a good chunk of the Slashdot readership would be brought up on charges.

  • by Nyder (754090) on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @08:03PM (#42267223) Journal

    for a few weeks of some of the funniest shit a celeb has done in quite awhile.

    • srsly, he strikes me as one of these "I'm rich, got there by being intelligent, and thus; I am greater than all of you, so piss off. I need to keep on doing whatever I want as I see fit." I'm feel in my bones that he did shoot that neighbor in Belize and was probably genuinely surprised that the local authorities wanted to bring him to justice. I could be wrong, but his pictures and actions to me just say "justified asshole".

      If I were the board of McAffee Holding, Inc (or however they are registered) I wou
      • I could be wrong, but his pictures and actions to me just say "justified asshole".

        I agree with that but it's a huge leap from there to him killing anyone.

        If it were a case of a "justified asshole" killing someone and being sure he could get away with it just through buying off police, there would be some evidence against him since he would not have cared about leaving any. The police have none.

        It's a much smaller leap to imagine someone was trying to frame him and using violence to do so, say whoever shot

        • by Darinbob (1142669)

          He's not just an asshole, the guy probably has brain damage from his experimental enhanced bath salts, he's clearly paranoid. Ok, maybe eccentric but I'll put my money on actual insanity.

    • by Grayhand (2610049)

      for a few weeks of some of the funniest shit a celeb has done in quite awhile.

      I think we're all gonna miss McAfee since it looks like it's Lohan's turn at bat. Fingers crossed McAfee tried to claim political asylum when Belize wants his ass back.

  • by Kergan (780543) on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @08:08PM (#42267269)

    What about Sam [whoismcafee.com], the Belizean chick a fourth of his age who followed him all along? Is she going to get kicked back to Belize?

  • by westlake (615356) on Wednesday December 12, 2012 @08:12PM (#42267305)

    The Treaty is one of a series of modern mutual legal assistance treaties being negotiated by the United States in order to counter criminal activities more effectively. The Treaty should be an effective tool to assist in the prosecution of a wide variety of crimes, including drug trafficking, money laundering, and terrorism offenses. The Treaty is self-executing.

    The Treaty provides for a broad range of cooperation in criminal matters. Mutual assistance available under the Treaty includes: taking the testimony or statements of persons; providing documents, records, and articles of evidence; locating or identifying persons; serving documents; transferring persons in custody for testimony or other purposes;executing requests for searches and seizures; assisting in proceedings related to immobilization and forfeiture of assets, restitution to the victims of crime and collection of fines; and any other form of assistance not prohibited by the laws of the State from whom the assistance is requested.

    I recommend that the Senate give early and favorable consideration to the Treaty, and give its advice and consent to ratification.

    GEORGE W. BUSH.

    TREATY WITH BELIZE ON MUTUAL LEGAL ASSISTANCE IN CRIMINAL MATTERS [oas.org]

    This tiny nation of only 280,000 people does seem to draw a surprising number of fugitives. They come here ''for the same reasons as the tourists,'' says Gerald Westby, Belize's police commissioner. ''It's English-speaking and close to Mexico.'' Some try to blend in with vacationers on sun-drenched coastal islands like Ambergris Cay, and others...try to find sanctuary in the jungle. They also appear to find comfort in the poverty (hence, their money goes further) and lawlessness (figuring they won't be a priority for local cops). Belize City is a violent place, currently suffering from a rash of ''pedal by'' shootings--executions by gunmen on bicycles.

    Belize signed an extradition treaty with the United States in 2000, but officials are often quite willing to expedite a deportation instead of the lengthy extradition process. ''Belize is very close to being one of the most cooperative Central American nations,'' says James Schield, chief of international investigations for the U.S. Marshals Service.

    Trouble in Paradise : U.S. fugitives may think they can hide in Belize, but here's the untold story of how some get caught [usnews.com]

    Cooperation on this level works both ways. If Belize wants McAfee they will very likely get him.

    • by borcharc (56372) *

      Until he gets on a plane to Britain where he is also a citizen.

      • by westlake (615356)

        Until he gets on a plane to Britain where he is also a citizen.

        You can run but you can't hide.

        Territories designated under part 2 are non-EU members of the European Convention on Extradition; or the London Scheme for Extradition within the Commonwealt; or else they are parties to bilateral extradition treaties with the UK. The countries involved are:

        Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, The Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize....

        Extradition from the UK: Extradition Act 2003 - part 2 [homeoffice.gov.uk]

  • he is lonely
  • soon the Miami airport systems will slow down when mcafee is dumped on to them.

  • by SLot (82781)

    that if there ever is a trial, it will last only 30 days.

    • When you're burned, you've got nothing: no cash, no credit, no job history. You're stuck in whatever city they decide to dump you in.

      Which one's Bruce Campbell ?

  • McAfee's first thought on disembarking: "Great, now where am I supposed to find a drug dealer in Miami?"

"Well hello there Charlie Brown, you blockhead." -- Lucy Van Pelt

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