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Android Businesses Google The Almighty Buck

Should Google Get Aggressive About Monetizing Android? 168

Posted by Soulskill
from the i'm-gonna-go-with-no dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Google's core search-advertising business is slowing down (despite an uptick in revenue and earnings for the most recent quarter) and a new report suggests that advertising ROI is much higher on iOS than Android. In light of that, it's worth asking whether Google, having dominated much of the mobile-device market with Android, will ever get around to more aggressively monetizing its mobile operating system, and what that could mean to the manufacturers that have been loading the software for free onto their hardware. If Google started charging licensing fees to manufacturers, and attempted to clamp down so that Google Play served as the only hub for Android apps (something that would definitely put it on a collision course with Amazon, which boasts its own Android app store), would it be shooting itself in the foot? Or would the rest of the ecosystem respond in a muted way, considering the sheer size of Google's power and presence?"
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Should Google Get Aggressive About Monetizing Android?

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  • Who knows (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:21PM (#45159529)

    They're too busy drinking Vic's koolaid to worry about anything else actually important. They don't care about the user anymore it's whatever Vic says to try to be like Facebook - when no one even cares.

  • Are we asking ... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by briancox2 (2417470) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:22PM (#45159533) Homepage Journal
    Are we asking whether Google should commit the same enormous Open Source/GPL faux pas that Oracle committed with MySQL?

    Seeing as Google is actively dumping MySQL for that very reason, I'd say, "No!"
    • Re:Are we asking ... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by WaywardGeek (1480513) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:19PM (#45159943) Journal

      Yes. The poster is asking if Google should do like so many previous evil companies and stop innovating, and instead focus on putting the pinch to their clients. Oracle falls squarely in this category. I'm hoping Google will instead decide to continue innovating. They've been pretty damned good at it.

      • by icebike (68054)

        There is lots google can do within its own sphere, (google Shopper, Google Wallet) without trying to drag more money out of the OS itself.

        Samsung is known to be working on its own version of an operating system that does not rely on Android, and
        with Ubuntu and Firefox and the bones of Blackberry being ready to step into the fight it would be stupid to piss off
        manufacturers.

        • by bonehead (6382)

          with Ubuntu and Firefox and the bones of Blackberry being ready to step into the fight it would be stupid to piss off
          manufacturers.

          I agree that pissing off the manufacturers wouldn't be the brightest move, however nobody you listed has a product that can step into the space and compete. The smartphone world currently consists of Android and iOS. Anybody and everybody else are just "me too" blips on the radar with no realistic chance of making an impact.

          Believe me, I'd love an alternative to Android, but at the moment iOS is the only one, and even it is a significant step down for my usage patterns.

      • If they don't focus on making money, their shareholders can sue them. Companies are there to make money, they can't be twisted into innovation factories. If they could we'd probably have free energy and plentiful drinking water by now.

        • by sFurbo (1361249)
          There is an important distinction between focusing on making as much money as you can, and focusing on making as much money you can on each of your products. It is in Googles best interest to keep all of the parts of the computer ecosystem they don't directly make money on as free and easy to use as possible, because that will make people spend more time on computers, including the parts that Google makes money on. As such, is is a huge advantage for them to have a relatively open and standadized mobile OS.
        • by crankyspice (63953) on Friday October 18, 2013 @02:09AM (#45161629)

          If they don't focus on making money, their shareholders can sue them. Companies are there to make money, they can't be twisted into innovation factories. If they could we'd probably have free energy and plentiful drinking water by now.

          Anyone can sue anyone for anything. (Whether or not they can do so successfully, or without being sanctioned, is another story -- I just won a nice attorney fee award from a father (lawyer) son (douchebag) team that sued a client of mine in state court, and then dismissed when we filed the Anti-SLAPP Motion to Strike I'd warned them repeatedly was coming... sigh...)

          That said, the "must increase shareholder value" trope is a myth: "This common and widespread perception lacks any solid basis in actual corporate law." http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2012/6/18%20corporate%20stout/stout_corporate%20issues.pdf [brookings.edu] (p. 4)

          If a business wanted to spend three years on R&D, as long as the directors embarked on that path in good faith, with appropriate consideration and care, and reasonably believed that they were acting in the best interests of the company, they'd be able to do so under, e.g., the Business Judgment Rule [cornell.edu].

          • But the suit I outlined would be legitimate and would win. Your first link is an opinion piece by a well intentioned lady who wishes corporations didn't have to maximize shareholder value, not a piece of law that states that they don't.

            Your second link confirms what I have said. A corporation has to act in good faith to... maximize shareholder wealth.

        • by rtb61 (674572) on Friday October 18, 2013 @02:49AM (#45161801) Homepage

          Smell that. You smell that! FUD son. Nothing else in the world smells like that. I lover the smell of FUD in the morning. Appleocalypse Now.

          Android is still growing. Places to expand to, the big screen TV, modem/router/home/social server (the next beg thing, the other end of an Android wireless VOIP phone call), the desktop, car, public transport et al. There are so many places to expand into, so many places that can offer up market opportunities for Google. Android ain't the money maker, Android is the wedge the opens up opportunities to make money, it can open up doors and keep them open.

          Think about this. How about if people started sharing a portion of their wireless broadband, as a sort of pool of resource for members, a percentage of bandwidth and total traffic, so that wandering around the streets means that the majority if calls go over broadband rather than cellular. There is a lot of scope of what can be done with modem/router/home/social server a whole major market to explore. Why else do you think Google got busted listening in, they were exploring and researching, the next big market.

          • How about if people started sharing a portion of their wireless broadband,

            People used to do this, but then the media companies started suing them when people 'misused' it.

            • by rtb61 (674572)

              However, if the appliance was properly hardwired and preconfigured to all say 20% sharing of available traffic and bandwidth, all organised my the major company supplying the modem/router/home/social server, that's completely different.

        • by Chrisq (894406)

          If they don't focus on making money, their shareholders can sue them.

          But in a very real sense they are suing themselves!

        • That's simply false. The Free Software Foundation and the Red Cross are corporations. Do you think they focus on making money?
          Google has given away over a BILLION dollars to charity.

          Shareholders have a cause of action if board members or executives take company assets and convert them to their PERSONAL use in a way that damages shareholders.
          The board and executives are serving as representatives of the shareholders, so they aren't allowed to put their personal gain above the interests of the shareholders

          • A not-for-profit corporation is an obvious exception. Google is for-profit. Google can only give away money if that ultimately helps profits.

            • Sorry, you're simply mistaken. I've been on the board of directors of nonprofit and for profit corporations. For the profit company, we could, as I explained, do just about anything EXCEPT convert company assets to personal use.

              For most for profit corporations, the Articles of Incorporation almost always say the purpose of the corporation is "any lawful purpose" because the board is supposed to abide by the articles. For a nonprofit, the articles are often more specific. So it's actually the nonprofit th

        • I think you have that the other way around: If we had free energy, we wouldn't need to worry about making profits.

          And by the way, Democracy Now receives funding from Ford, Carnegie Corporation, and George Soros (who has a very outspoken political bias),

          • But the people who make profits don't want us to have free energy, they want to make profits. They certainly don't want to selflessly work toward that goal of free energy.

      • Yes. The poster is asking if Google should do like so many previous evil companies and stop innovating, and instead focus on putting the pinch to their clients. Oracle falls squarely in this category. I'm hoping Google will instead decide to continue innovating. They've been pretty damned good at it.

        ===
        As far as I know, Ubuntu, RedHat, Suse linuxes are testing their ARM versions of LInux systems. Gnome is working on an Android clone (compare Gnome 3.10 Desktop to Android). Input is different, but results are similar. Android though offers better application integration/configuration.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Fork fork fork.

    • But if they are to now, immediately, would be a very good time.

      I still don't own an Android device so.. Makes decisions easier :)

  • Check out the ads they are placing into the default gmail app. They will slowly add them to all bundled google services on Android.
    • by EmagGeek (574360)

      You can always run pure Android without gapps. I do, and I don't miss gapps one bit.

      • by hazem (472289)

        Can you recommend some ways to do this?

        • Go to the applications settings and disable every Google application, you can even disable the almighty (a lot of permissions and autoupdateable) Google Services applications

          • by KiloByte (825081)

            There's a downside: fdroid and co have a small fraction of Google Play's selection, but considering the extent of calling home going on, that quickly becomes a necessity if you want any semblance of privacy. I'd say giving an Android system the credentials of a google account is not so wise a decision.

      • ...what email app are you going to use? Presumably you use some cloud-based 'free' email service. Be it gmail, yahoo, outlook, aol, etc. These are all ad-supported, and if they don't 'read' your mail in order to better target the ads, it's because they haven't (yet) figured out how. And if they haven't figured that out, I'd be just as worried about whether they've figured out how to keep intruders from reading your mail instead...

        So, when it comes to ad-supported free services, the standard probably sho

    • by petman (619526)
      What ads are you talking about? I don't see any ads in the Gmail app, other than the ads contained in e-mails.
      • by Rob Y. (110975)

        I think the fear (and probable reality) is that your email is being read to better target ads when you search Google or when you use YouTube or some other Google site that uses display advertising. Of course, you're going to see ads on those sites anyway, so the issue is whether the technology to target those ads is unacceptably intrusive. For now, I'm taking Google's word that this is all done robotically, and no other nefarious use is being made of the resulting information. And if it were, and people

  • Misleading summary (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dinfinity (2300094) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:27PM (#45159571)

    a new report suggests that advertising ROI is much higher on iOS than Android.

    That Facebook advertising ROI is much higher on iOS than Android.

    • There is no reason to believe that Google and Facebook ads, which both are more successful on iOS, are statistically different from other advertising platforms.
      • by aaronb1138 (2035478) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @10:11PM (#45160241)
        Either way, the study just confirms something that most people already knew via anecdote or stereotype: iOS users buy into advertising / marketing at a higher rate than other people.

        Draw your own conclusions and discuss.
        • by Sockatume (732728)

          It's because revenue per click is six times higher on iPhone than Android. People spend more, they don't actually visit ads more.

        • by rasmusbr (2186518)

          Either way, the study just confirms something that most people already knew via anecdote or stereotype: iOS users buy into advertising / marketing at a higher rate than other people.

          Draw your own conclusions and discuss.

          It's simpler than that. Both iOS and Android users buy into advertisement, click on ads, make purchases, etc. The difference is that iOS users are wealthier than Android users on average and therefore spend more money. Apple completely dominates the high-income customer segment of the smartphone market.

          • by rasmusbr (2186518)

            That said, my personal experience running a free app with banner ads on Android has been that I earn about $1.00 per 1000 ad impressions, which is roughly the normal rate for banner ads on iOS from what I've been told.

            My users are mostly from northern Europe, USA and Canada, which are of course income regions. Maybe that explains why my app is doing okay even though it's and Android app.

          • by Rob Y. (110975)

            I'll bet GS4 or HTC One users spend as much as iPhone users. Maybe they need to charge different rates based on the specific device being used. Advertisers aren't going to ditch Android altogether. Like it or not, that's where the mass of users are. Come to think of it, if only the flagship devices were subject to an ad barrage, I'd go with the cheapest Chinese slab of plastic that's powerful enough to get the job done. More likely, you'd get just as many ads - just a lower class of adds on the cheap d

    • by MightyYar (622222)

      It shouldn't surprise anyone that devices with a higher ASP tend to be in the pockets of people with more cash to throw around. I bet subway lines through rich neighborhoods command a higher ad price than on subways lines through blighted areas.

    • Could this just be that Android users are more wary of ads... or that iPhone users click on the ads not knowing they are an ad ....?

  • by alvinrod (889928) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:30PM (#45159599)
    It's too late for them to even try to monetize Android as attempting to charge for it will just drive their hardware partners down the same path as Amazon or towards other platforms like Ubuntu, Firefox OS, Windows Phone, Tizen, etc. That would be bad for Google as it might mean that fewer people use their services, which means fewer ad views, which means less revenue. I can't imagine that some of their hardware partners are overly thrilled that they've started selling Nexus devices at close to cost and have further eroded their profit margins, so some might be fine with testing other waters if Google wanted to start charging for the OS.
  • by iYk6 (1425255) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:44PM (#45159699)

    History is ripe with companies that built a product that does something different, and in ways better, than the competition. And once their product is successful, they try to emulate something that somebody else does, and their product share slowly declines as their users realize there is no longer anything special about the product.

    Look at Firefox. It was a faster, lighter, less annoying and extensible browser. Over time, it slowly got bulkier, slower, and in some ways buggier. They annoy users by panicing any time a certificate is signed by an authority not on the list. When Google released Chrome, Firefox decided they wanted to have a Chrome-like super fast release cycle, which hurt extensions. Users are slowly leaving Firefox for other browsers, especially Chrome, as Firefox becomes less and less special.

    If Google locks down the OS and prevents users from installing their own applications, then Android will no longer be special. People will still use it, since it's still a smart phone and devices will be cheaper than Apple. But as soon as a competitor comes along that offers what Google used to offer, users will quickly leave, and within several years Android will be a memory.

    • MITM in the wild (Score:5, Insightful)

      by tepples (727027) <tepples&gmail,com> on Thursday October 17, 2013 @10:02PM (#45160197) Homepage Journal

      They annoy users by panicing any time a certificate is signed by an authority not on the list.

      This is desired behavior for SSL. Otherwise, a man in the middle could start his own private CA and issue certs for each site that you view. Bug 460374 [mozilla.org] shows MITM in the wild. If I wanted to verify self-signed certificates through route diversity, I'd install the Perspectives extension. (And I have.)

      When Google released Chrome, Firefox decided they wanted to have a Chrome-like super fast release cycle, which hurt extensions.

      It hurt native extensions other than NPAPI media handlers, but it led to a more-or-less stable API for writing extensions completely in JavaScript.

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      History is ripe with companies that built a product that does something different

      History is developed to the point of readiness for harvesting and eating with companies that built a product that does something different? I think the word you're vainly searching for is rife.

  • by PrimeNumber (136578) <PrimeNumber&excite,com> on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:47PM (#45159713) Homepage

    This is the ultimate objective of Google+, reducing the number of independant blogs and websites with G+ blogs and pages so keep margins high. With less independent bloggers and websites, ad revenue for these pages will shrink, and Google makes more money.
    It is also why people like Mike Elgan and Robert Scoble shill the fuck out of everything Google does, because they know which way the wind is blowing. They are both full of shit, but they didn't get to where they are by not playing well with the big dogs. In return they get free shit from people, web hits and paid speaking gigs, and get to pretend like they are important.
    I liked Google much more before they became scumbags like Facebook. Now you can't login to Gmail without it wanting you to create a Google plus account, want your phone number and other contact details. This behaviour along with sharing the email and contact lists to the NSA, getting caught lying about it, now trying to act like a good guy and lobby congress to protect privacy. If Google cared so much about users' privacy they would have lobbied before the Snowden leak.

    • by Sockatume (732728)

      Google makes an enormous amount of money through ad space on independent blogs and websites, so no. They're a horizontal company, not a vertical one: where there's ad space, they want to be there. G+ is a reaction to the idea that Facebook, a vertical company, might replace those blogs and sites.

  • If Google started charging licensing fees to manufacturers, and attempted to clamp down so that Google Play served as the only hub for Android apps

    Android is just Linux + mobile UI + Java. If Google were to charge manufacturers for Android OS, shouldn't Oracle be within its rights to charge for Java on Android?

  • My dad complains about ads getting in his way so he can't do anything on his phone. My AOSP build can't install google apps so I can't buy from the store.

    So casual users and hardcore users getting screwed.

    Android phones aren't much different from iPhone except you can go outside the walled garden, which means you developers will be able to sell their apps even if they compete with "official" offerings. You can disable updates. Etc.

    Android with AOSP is WONDERFUL, with it broken... I'm waiting for the Ubu
  • ...Microsoft will have more than a snowball's chance in Hell of getting more marketshare with their mobile OS. There is such a thing as eating your seed corn, and monetizing Android would be exactly that. Yeah, they'd get a few million bucks for this quarter at the expense of advertising revenue and marketshare. And they would be lucky to break even on earnings and then lose in the long run.

    --
    BMO

  • by kawabago (551139) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:58PM (#45159793)
    Android is popular because any manufacturer can make a fully functional phone for very little development cost. Free is a strength, not a weakness. Microsoft has a closed proprietary phone and it isn't doing well at all. A closed source Android would fare just as well. A free platform is just that, a platform. It's up to the manufacturer to launch a profitable business either under or over Android. Under meaning the hardware and over being services provided by the platform. It is a win-win proposition for everyone and that is why it does so well.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      I bought my Android phone for almost the same cost as an iPhone...but I didn't buy on price, I bought on features, and I love it. The latest iOS is very similar to the Samsung customizations...to quote my nephew who hates iOS7, "If I'd wanted a Samsung, I'd have bought a Samsung." Well, I wanted a Samsung, and bought one. Open is very important to me. Lack of ads is very important to me. I stopped using AOL when they had blinking ads. (well, not really, I stopped using their client, and switched to web

    • by 21mhz (443080)

      Android is popular because any manufacturer can make a fully functional phone for very little development cost. Free is a strength, not a weakness. Microsoft has a closed proprietary phone and it isn't doing well at all.

      As an upside to keeping their cards close to their vest, they have easily rolled out a "fuck your OEM/carrier, here's a dev preview directly from us if you're not afraid of voiding your warranty", and it's not reported to be causing many problems to people trying it.

      Google cannot push an update for the above-hardware parts of Android and expect everything to work, because the device vendors have been tweaking those as well. So the tinkerers have to use third-party mods like Cyanogen, or stick with a Nexus.

      It is a win-win proposition for everyone and that is why it does so well.

      I

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        Google cannot push an update for the above-hardware parts of Android and expect everything to work, because the device vendors have been tweaking those as well. So the tinkerers have to use third-party mods like Cyanogen, or stick with a Nexus.

        But what you're forgetting is that the tinkerers have those options with the Android phones, where they don't with the Windows phones. Sure, some of those users don't; but these days it's pretty well-known whose phones you should buy if you want stuff like that.

  • by DrJimbo (594231) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:19PM (#45159937)

    The title of the first FA is:

    Google earnings beat estimates, but Motorola losses keep growing

    The second FA is strictly about Facebook ads. It says:

    One caveat that Slagen offered, however, is that the data changes with industry, and that gaming and e-commerce industries, for instance, did not see the same kind of massive iPhone/Android gulf in ROI.

    The summary stinks of typical anti-Google FUD.

    Google beat earnings estimates. Google's Android OS drastically beat expectations on how soon it would totally dominate the smartphone market. So some asshat suggests that these results mean Google is doing poorly and it is only a matter of time before Google joins Apple and Microsoft (and others) by turning to the dark side.

    Having a dominate market share in the smart phone sector is HUGE. Google's plan for Android was to make sure they would not get shut out of the smart phone ads business. The plan far exceeded expectations all around.

  • by tuppe666 (904118) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:31PM (#45160019)

    Google stock hits a record on its quarterly results...Jumping 8% in after hour trading. Its ad revenue despite what the article implies grew 17% year-over-year. That is up from its 15% growth in the second quarter.

    But the reality is Googles growth is in "Other" revenue; which grew 85% thanks to sale of Apps...sound like they are monetizing Android even without advertising.

    Graph showing revenue by revenue source http://b-i.forbesimg.com/roberthof/files/2013/10/Screen-shot-2013-10-17-at-1.45.11-PM.png [forbesimg.com]

  • Which is better, $100 a year for 50 years or $500 right now and $0 for the the next 50 years? I guess if you are most of corporate America, it is the second one.
  • by celest (100606) <mekki@@@mekki...ca> on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:39PM (#45160071) Homepage

    Why is it that in 2013 the majority of discussions about generating revenue using a free/libre/open source strategy are still focused on "clamping down" and other zero-sum game thought patterns? Haven't we shown yet that there are not only strategies to generate revenue with open source that don't involve trying to control everything, but also that these strategies can be more successful in the long run? The type of "collision course" competition that the OP mentions is strategy thinking from the 70s and 80s. We're past that. We can do better.

    I think a more interesting question to ask is: "How can Google generate revenue from Android while continuing to nurture the ecosystem and helping other stakeholders also continue to benefit from its success?". Facing challenging questions and trying to solve them is far more interesting than simply assuming that there is no solution, especially when anecdoctal evidence suggests otherwise.

    Disclaimer: I'm doing my doctoral research in strategic management in the area of open source strategy, so my perspective is necessarily biased. Some of my work can be found at http://osstrategy.org/ [osstrategy.org]

    • by AHuxley (892839)
      At this time you are exposing your daily movements, shopping, keywords, friends, pics, video and location data to a wide set of apps, telco layers, your isp, telco and US brand.
      Everybody sees a win in tracking you. What if the telco can offer to keep all that data sealed off in 'their' branded phone while letting users just use Google maps, email, chat via a browser with a huge user base of free existing apps and pay software too?
      All telco/isp branded, less cash flow out to the USA?
      The teclo could on
    • How much do you pay to use Google's search engine ... how much do they make from it ...

  • by Tony Isaac (1301187) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:59PM (#45160183) Homepage

    Devices running iOS sell at a premium, to people who don't mind paying more for goods they consider superior. Of course people with extra money will be able to buy more advertised products! People who are more cost-conscious will tend to gravitate to Android, and will also likely be more wary of advertising.

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      Devices running iOS sell at a premium, to people who don't mind paying more for goods they consider superior. Of course people with extra money will be able to buy more advertised products! People who are more cost-conscious will tend to gravitate to Android, and will also likely be more wary of advertising.

      It's easily a big disparity. . Their ad click-through rates are 2.5 times as high as Android, And we're talking about a platform that is outsold 4:1 by Android. [anthillonline.com]

      The big problem is that on Android, you can

    • by c (8461)

      Devices running iOS sell at a premium, to people who don't mind paying more for goods they consider superior. Of course people with extra money will be able to buy more advertised products! People who are more cost-conscious will tend to gravitate to Android, and will also likely be more wary of advertising.

      Or, perhaps, people who are easily influenced by advertising tend to buy iOS products.

    • by rasmusbr (2186518)

      Devices running iOS sell at a premium, to people who don't mind paying more for goods they consider superior. Of course people with extra money will be able to buy more advertised products! People who are more cost-conscious will tend to gravitate to Android, and will also likely be more wary of advertising.

      True, in addition to that Apple does a lot to maintain the image in the minds of the customers that the iPhone is the ultimate smartphone and that it is the default and correct choice for high income and upper medium income people.

      There is no way that Google could do the same for Android in general, but Google could make a premium brand of Android devices and try to market those. By premium I don't mean something like their reasonably priced Nexus series of devices, those are wonderful in terms of value for

  • The smart people know they are been watched and are just using the service as a free tool.
    That reduces the userbase to a vast trendy herd. As many other telco makers have found, that vast trendy herd is cheap and fickle.
    The other aspect is code been 'open' 'free' and i.e. 'not MS, Apple'. That has helped a lot with the branding propaganda.
    With MS and Apple you knew what kind of walled garden you where buying into. To alter aspects of the open usersbase experience mid generation is a hard sell.
    To alter t
  • by BlueF (550601)
    What, monetize like selling the name of their next major OS release?!

    Any one else seriously annoyed by this... something that entirely shouldnt matter? Dunno why, but it does.
    I havent seen it, sounded too depressing / prescient, but I imagine this to be in the vein of Idiocracy [wikipedia.org] [wikipedia.org].

  • Advertising ROI (Score:2, Insightful)

    by SeanBlader (1354199)
    Return on investment for mobile advertising is less effective on Google devices because Google users are smarter.
  • Google just need the data which users give away when using Android. All those searches, GPS data, emails, whatever else users are subconsciously giving away so Google can turn every user in to a product to sell to advertisers. As mobile becomes more and more prominent, Google is going to have to have rely more on Android to bring in revenue. Any plans which could negatively effect their market share is completely out of the question.

    One day Android will lose its market share and it'll be the first sign i
  • Google's best bet is to cut a deal with Samsung and forget about the rest of the android manufacturers. Samsung already has locked up the Android market; anything that can tighten that hold is good for Google and Samsung if they form a partnership. Since key parts of the handset OS are licensed under ASL, not GPL, Google can focus on developing a Samsung specific advanced version of Android that need not be made broadly available, Samsung on the hardware end, and both on creating a content delivery eco syst
    • That is a very interesting concept.

      But I'm not sure this serves Google any better than dropping Android entirely and partnering with Apple. Isn't it the single-vendor bake-in that led them to do Android in the first place?

      • That is a very interesting concept.

        But I'm not sure this serves Google any better than dropping Android entirely and partnering with Apple.

        The advantage for Google is they are partnering with a hardware oriented company. Google brings the software and infrastructure to the table and the two can leverage their individual strengths to build the total system. Unlike Apple which does both hw and sw, each has complementary strengths and are not dealing with a partner that may decide to go it alone later without a significant investment in capabilities.

        Isn't it the single-vendor bake-in that led them to do Android in the first place?

        True, they worried about Apple entering the search market if the iPhone became the predominant sma

  • I just read in another article that the Nexus 5 will sell for $349. That must be at or below the cost of production, comparing to similar models and iPhones of like generation.

    So Google can sell phones for zero profit, and then make their money how? *IS* it advertising? Or is it apps and media? Or nothing at all, they just want to take over the market?

    It seems to me that they're best off capturing share until the ad revenue means the bottom line is negative. Then even a few pennies per box will mean real in

  • Talk of monetizing the Android, a week after MicroSoft decides to give
    it's phone software away; in hope many will select the dual bootable Windows
    over Android.

    I didn't post this, then today I read "Google shares touch $1,000 for the first time ever"
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101093044 [cnbc.com] a surge in mobile and video advertising that helped drive quarterly revenue up 23 percent.
    Google seems to be doing rather nicely, thank you

    Google has started doing small things that tick me off, but two request one for each accoun

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