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Snowden Says He Took No Secret Files To Russia 220

Posted by Soulskill
from the but-he-stores-all-his-ebooks-on-microfiche dept.
mspohr writes "There's an interesting interview with Edward Snowden in the NY Times. He talks freely about his decision to start collecting documents. His experience in reporting problems and abuse convinced him he would be discredited. He also states he didn't take any of the documents to Russia and that the Chinese don't have them either. 'What would be the unique value of personally carrying another copy of the materials onward? There's a zero percent chance the Russians or Chinese have received any documents,' he said. Snowden turned them all over to the journalists. He also corrects last week's NY Times story about the derogatory comment in his personnel file; it was due to him discovering and trying to report a vulnerability in the CIA's internal software."
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Snowden Says He Took No Secret Files To Russia

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  • by TWiTfan (2887093) on Friday October 18, 2013 @09:00AM (#45163483)

    Once again our heroic leakers foil the bumbling Russkies!

  • by Austrian Anarchy (3010653) on Friday October 18, 2013 @09:00AM (#45163487) Homepage Journal

    There's a zero percent chance the Russians or Chinese have received any documents,' he said. Snowden turned them all over to the journalists.

    Turning documents over to journalists, or anybody employed in any other profession, does not make them magically uninterceptable, unreadable, or unposessable by Russians, Chinese, or anybody else. He has no control over the distribution after he hands it off to anybody, and the people who have the stuff might not even know if someone else is reading it.

    • by TWiTfan (2887093) on Friday October 18, 2013 @09:03AM (#45163517)

      God forbid anyone send them by email. They might fall into the hands of the NSA!

    • by mjr167 (2477430)
      Don't worry. The Russians and Chinese don't have the internet so won't be able to read what the journalists publish.
    • Turning documents over to journalists, or anybody employed in any other profession, does not make them magically uninterceptable, unreadable, or unposessable by Russians, Chinese, or anybody else.

      Reading comprehension fail? Clearly the statement is that Snowden turned the documents directly over to journalists without some intermediary and not to known Russian or Chinese government agents. Obviously, Snoweden wouldn't know if he's handing over documents to Russian agents embedded in the journalistic field

    • by interkin3tic (1469267) on Friday October 18, 2013 @11:06AM (#45164955)
      You're right, but I'm going to forgive him for engaging in hyperbole, given that the other side flat out lied about much bigger issues, while under oath to congress.
  • by TheRaven64 (641858) on Friday October 18, 2013 @09:18AM (#45163657) Journal

    The important thing to remember is that if it was so easy for him to get these documents, then that also means that there are about a million other people with the same clearance level as him who would find it equally easy. What's the betting that none of those are Chinese agents? Especially given how many Russian agents we've learned were working for the NSA and CIA during the cold war.

    People focus on Snowden's disclosure as if it's possibly giving information to America's enemies (or, at least, not-so-friendly friends), but any of them that doesn't have a completely inept intelligence agency of their own will already have the information he's released. It was only secret from the people to whom these agencies should be accountable.

    • by mjr167 (2477430)

      We require you to have American citizenship to get a clearance so we know none of our cleared people are Russian or Chinese!

      The system totally works.

    • by phayes (202222)

      So the NSA employs "a million" sysadmins who steal their colleagues & bosses credentials so that they can gan access to files they normally wouldn't be able to see? So glad nobody on Snowden's side is using hyperbole...

      • There are currently a million people who have Top Secret or above security clearance. That means, one million people who may be sharing secrets with a foreign power if they are bribed or blackmailed into doing so. Do you really trust the vetting to have managed to find a million incorruptible people in the USA?
      • TheRaven64 says there are a million people with the same clearance level and asks what are the chances that none are Chinese agents. You counter by making them all sysadmins who are all* stealing other people's credentials. And you think he's using hyperbole?

        The opposite of none is at least one, not all of them.

        * I know you don't use the word "all" but it is clearly implied in what you wrote. Compare the following: "There are a million people who have cancer." and "There are a million people, some of whom

    • by Sarten-X (1102295)

      any of them that doesn't have a completely inept intelligence agency of their own will already have the information he's released.

      But that's not the concern. Anyone with an intelligence agency capable of getting the information directly from the NSA would probably also have the resources to have a custom encryption mechanism that the NSA can't read, anyway, and enough steganography to avoid suspicion.

      The enemies that the NSA's mechanism is effective against are the poorly-funded individuals and small groups who don't have their own sophisticated intelligence agency, which means they're also not the big and easy-to-find groups. They're

  • by thue (121682) on Friday October 18, 2013 @09:19AM (#45163681) Homepage

    There has been various accusations that Snowden leaked the documents to Russia, willingly or unwillingly. This should (in a perfect world) make those accusations less valid. Also, this shows against that Snowden is damn brave and clever - it must have been very tempting to hold on to the documents, which he paid so dearly for.

    http://www.thenation.com/blog/174983/did-russia-china-harvest-snowdens-secrets# [thenation.com]

  • “So long as there’s broad support amongst a people, it can be argued there’s a level of legitimacy even to the most invasive and morally wrong program, as it was an informed and willing decision”

    He's basically claiming that the problem with all this spying isn't so much it's going on, but that it's going on in secret, without oversight. Fascinating, and it makes sense: take CCTV in the UK--far reaching, nearly ubiquitous, yet everyone knows it's there, and while there are privacy hawks who are against it, there's not nearly the level of outrage as there has been in the US over NSA's spying.

  • everyone else has...

    if you where to think otherwise would be a strategic error...
    huawei own too much of the interconnect to not have the majority of the same information as NSA...
    signing authorities are compromised...

    move on and self sign

    thanks

    John Jones

     

  • Well, if true....this = Patriot

  • "He did so by adding some code and text âoein a nonmalicious mannerâ to his evaluation document that showed that the vulnerability existed, he said. His immediate supervisor signed off on it and sent it through the system, but a more senior manager â" the man Mr. Snowden had challenged earlier â" was furious and filed a critical comment in Mr. Snowdenâ(TM)s personnel file, he said."

    "But the incident, Mr. Snowden said, convinced him that trying to work through the system would only l

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