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Gartner: OpenStack Lacks Clarity 77

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the perils-of-developing-outdoors dept.
An anonymous reader writes with a quick bite from El Reg: "The OpenStack open-source project has come in for criticism from a Gartner analyst because the claims made by companies frequently don't line up with reality. In a forthright post published on Tuesday Gartner analyst and research director Alessandro Perilli chided the OpenStack community for a lack of clarity, lack of transparency, lack of vision, and lack of pragmatism." An OpenStack developer disagrees, and instead suggests that the perceived lack of clarity is just a result of the open development process. You just don't get to see which Amazon cloud projects fail since they are hidden behind the corporate wall.
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Gartner: OpenStack Lacks Clarity

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  • What's not clear or pragmatic about the project goal of taking over the world?

  • Funded by (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Havokmon (89874) <rick.havokmon@com> on Wednesday November 20, 2013 @01:28PM (#45473903) Homepage Journal
    Gartner is nothing more than a PR company for whoever pays for their 'analysis'.
    • And I was just thinking: "Wait, Gartner is calling attention to the claims made by companies not reflecting reality?! They going to out themselves next?"
    • by NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) on Wednesday November 20, 2013 @01:35PM (#45473979)
      If Gartner predicted the Sun was coming up tomorrow, I'd be wondering who paid them to say it, and what the angle was.
    • Re:Funded by (Score:4, Informative)

      by s.petry (762400) on Wednesday November 20, 2013 @03:03PM (#45474793)

      While I agree with your point, I have to also agree with a few of the points Gartner's analyst made. Ever try to implement OpenStack? Some things are okay (Virtual Machines), but other things are horribly convoluted (Virtual Routing). Version upgrades break previous functionality, and documentation is lacking so finding what actually broken requires lots of time and effort. Waiting for the documentation to catch up is fine until you need a feature or bug fix in the latest version.

      I'm not claiming that it's horrible mind you, but rather pointing out that it needs some time to mature. Gartner's opinion does not mention the fact that OpenSource products like this can do very well (Apache, Linux, MariaDB/MySQL). At the same time, enough OpenSource projects fall off the Earth to have some concerns.

      • Re:Funded by (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Havokmon (89874) <rick.havokmon@com> on Wednesday November 20, 2013 @03:11PM (#45474853) Homepage Journal

        While I agree with your point, I have to also agree with a few of the points Gartner's analyst made. Ever try to implement OpenStack? Some things are okay (Virtual Machines), but other things are horribly convoluted (Virtual Routing). Version upgrades break previous functionality, and documentation is lacking so finding what actually broken requires lots of time and effort. Waiting for the documentation to catch up is fine until you need a feature or bug fix in the latest version.

        I'm not claiming that it's horrible mind you, but rather pointing out that it needs some time to mature. Gartner's opinion does not mention the fact that OpenSource products like this can do very well (Apache, Linux, MariaDB/MySQL). At the same time, enough OpenSource projects fall off the Earth to have some concerns.

        "A lie is best placed between two truths."

        Gartner always makes some valid points. They are masters of manipulation.

        While it sounds like you're well-informed, the majority of their followers are not and I would go so far as to say those people, even when reading the details presented within, rarely truly understand the content.

        • by s.petry (762400)

          An easy to spot fallacy is when someone claims that facts are no longer facts because someone untrustworthy presented them. It's easy to cross over into the same realm as "those people" you are referring to when doing so.

          And "hell yes", I'm guilty of doing the same thing often enough. I don't like to, or do so intentionally, but I am human.

          • by sjames (1099)

            His point was subtly different though. He doesn't claim that the facts aren't facts because of who wrote about them, he's saying they are well known for slipping non-facts in with the facts and calls for a very careful reading to distinguish the two.

            That is perfectly reasonable. One should always give extra scrutiny to anything said by someone with that sort of history.

  • by DarkOx (621550) on Wednesday November 20, 2013 @01:37PM (#45473995) Journal

    Its funny, I would apply almost all those same vague criticisms to Gartner.

    I wish people would just quick subscribing to the pay to play crap opinion pieces they try to pass off as research. Its painful obvious to anyone who actually has to /use/administer/support/deploy an IT product where it falls in the "magic quadrant" has more to do with the market cap of the company behind it, that the products own merits.

  • The very nature of OpenStack is pretty clear. If you have any questions about "clarity", go download the source code and set it up for yourself and setup your own VPDC.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Typical techie response which lacks insight into the needs of the rest of the world...

      Not that I am defending Gartner - they are a marketing company which publishes positions based on who has paid them money - but the whole "just get the source code and ..." thinking demonstrates a basic lack of understanding for the rest of the world. It is just as bad and just as myopic as Gartner is.

  • A Gartner Analyst attacked something for 'lacking clarity' and 'claims that frequently don't line up with reality'? Please give me a moment to collect my jaw from the floor and restore it to its operating location.

    I'm not sure I've ever seen such a bold example of un-selfawareness...
  • Openstack is immature, and the project not very cohesive. He is right that the networking in neutron is way behind where it needs to be. However I don't see a lot of alternatives if you run a large cloud with unique requirements. You can use Amazon, but then you have to ask how much you trust Amazon's cloud. You can spend a lot of money and buy VMWare, but you are locked in with VMWare's enterprise specific focus.
    • VMWare's enterprise focus? Who do you think Gartner is talking to? VMWare and Azure both have mature (well, relatively) solutions that don't require you to basically do it yourself with a bunch of discrete tools that sort of work together.
    • by EvilSS (557649)
      I think that's part of his point. Big "cloud" providers seem to like OpenStack, but "cloud" is their bread and butter, so they can hire around it. Enterprises are a totally different use case, and that is the area his paper is addressing. They don't want to re-invent the wheel to roll out their infrastructure, they want an off the shelf solution that is as easy to maintain and implement as possible*. Most enterprises are not in the IT business, they are in the [insert business sector here] business. An
  • If you have the chance, go back and look at what Gartner has condescendingly pontificated on as "inevitable" over the years. Gartner's track record is abysmal. If they were a stockbroker, you'd make a mint just by being contrarian to their advice.
  • "The difference between these two cloud giant is that everything OpenStack does, it does in the open. All our successes and failures are in the open.

    "The OpenStack community is an awesome software factory which has an awe-inspiring process for managing releases with a continuous integration, source code management, peer review tools so much so that one of its community members has packaged up the process itself as a product offering." ref [tumblr.com]

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

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