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60% of Americans Unaware of Looming Incandescent Bulb Phase Out 944

Posted by Soulskill
from the let's-complain-about-color-temperature-some-more dept.
Lucas123 writes "Even though production of 75W and 100W incandescent lamps were phased out earlier this year, many U.S. consumers remain blissfully unaware of The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, an energy efficiency standard that requires an initial 30% reduction in energy use for screw-in bulbs. By 2020, the federal standard requires bulbs to use 65% less energy. According to a new survey, only 40% of Americans are aware that incandescent bulbs are being phased out. However, the federal regulations are about to impact the most popular bulbs of all — 40W and 60W lamps. As of Jan. 1, 2014, the bulbs will no longer be produced. A significant portion of those who are aware of the phase out have been hoarding the bulbs in anticipation of the ban."
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60% of Americans Unaware of Looming Incandescent Bulb Phase Out

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:00PM (#45783765)

    If you have a brain, you got rid of those fucking things more than 5 years ago.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:18PM (#45783881)

      Nope.

      1) Large initial outlay on the energy saving bulbs;

      2) When I factor in the cost of even one or two out of two dozen bulbs which go wrong early in their life, I'm not saving money;

      3) All but the most expensive do not light up nearly as quickly as traditional;

      4) Colour profile of almost all of them is not as nice as incandescent;

      5) Disposal of a complex electronic device is more difficult.

    • by Mr D from 63 (3395377) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:53PM (#45784061)

      If you have a brain, you got rid of those fucking things more than 5 years ago.

      It would be a pretty stupid thing to buy and expensive LED or other bulb to put in a crawlspace, or attic, or even a closet. Payback will never happen. Not enough energy used to make a difference either.

      • by mellon (7048) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @07:36PM (#45784333) Homepage

        Yup. And you can continue to get industrial incandescents for this application even after the ban.

      • by ModernGeek (601932) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @10:41PM (#45785273) Homepage

        If you have a brain, you got rid of those fucking things more than 5 years ago.

        It would be a pretty stupid thing to buy and expensive LED or other bulb to put in a crawlspace, or attic, or even a closet. Payback will never happen. Not enough energy used to make a difference either.

        I am not an Electrician, but I'm pretty sure that you aren't supposed to use incandescent lights in a closet because of the fire risk involved. An attic or crawlspace, which will have exposed insulation and other combustibles that aren't behind a firewall (Drywall) like the other parts of your home, probably shouldn't have those in there either. It produces a very real and tangible safety issue. House fires started in concealed places are the worst as you can be in your home and not notice until it's too late.
        While you use these for a short amount of time, it is easy to leave one on. Just spend the $5-$25 for the remote possibility of saving a $100,000 - $1,000,000 structure.

        • ^No, there is absolutely no safety case or requirement for those bulbs use cases. Halogen bulbs get hot too.
    • by SeaFox (739806) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:58PM (#45784085)

      If you have a brain, you got rid of those fucking things more than 5 years ago.

      Notice how it's not suggested the reason 60% of people are "blissfully unaware" of this phase-out is because they stopped using incandescent bulbs already and don't care.

  • by rsilvergun (571051) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:01PM (#45783773)
    LED light bulbs have low cost and no flicker. If you need a specific lighting profile there's plenty of sites that'll sell it to you. I find it hard getting upset that incandescents are going away. It's not like we're going to pay for the power infrastructure to support them...
    • by Arker (91948) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:19PM (#45783883) Homepage

      You obviously dont live in an area with less than perfect power delivery.

      Where I am is not bad, but still just far enough from perfect that those new 'long life' bulbs do not last any longer than incandescents. They just cost 20 times as much, they arent as bright, and they are inferior in absolutely every way.

      Rich idiots in privileged settings come up with this crap and force it down the throats of the rest of us, and no offense but you sure sound like part of the problem. Just because you dont need something does not give you license to outlaw it and screw with the rest of us like that. If you dont think incandescent bulbs are a good value for you then dont buy them, but preventing those of us that do need them from obtaining them is just meanness.

      • by milkasing (857326)

        Rich idiots in privileged settings, my foot. Power delivery in India is truly horrible. Yet everyone in India has florescent lamps. They prefer it because it is brighter, is a more natural light than incandescent, is cheaper in the long run and lasts longer. Seeing the prevalence of incandescents in the US was one of my WTF moments, when I first came over.

      • by SuperBanana (662181) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @08:49PM (#45784713)

        Rich idiots in privileged settings come up with this crap and force it down the throats of the rest of us,

        Nothing like a bit of ad hominem in the morning. Yeah, I'm sure it has nothing to do with the 1:4 efficiency difference and is a conspiracy by rich people to cram "crap" down the throats of us "common", good, hard-workin' innocent folk.

        The whole reason this has been legislated is that people refuse to buy compact fluorescent bulbs because they're stubborn and hate change. So they say "they give me headaches" and "they're not as bright" and so on. Even "they cost too much", after you've gone blue in the face showing them the VERY basic math that a 3rd grader could do, showing they pay themselves back within a year or two, AND practically give them away with rebates.

        • There is a political and cultural phenomenon in the US known as the "limousine liberal" -- otherwise well off people supporting agendas, often environmental ones, which have a a high financial cost which is trivial to them but expensive for other people.

          Examples of this include pushing hybrid cars, organic and free range foods, and apparently light bulbs, too. There are other more political examples, like higher taxes to support social welfare programs or higher gas taxes.

          None of this is to suggest that th

    • by davros74 (194914) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @07:40PM (#45784359) Homepage

      While I'd like to switch over to more LEDs, every LED bulb I have purchased so far has had manufacturer instructions that they should NOT be mounted in an enclosed fixture (such as a ceiling dome). So what are the millions of people supposed to do when these fixtures, which basically only allow incandescents, have no suitable replacements? Same applies for certain types of recessed lighting - CFLs and LEDs are not allowed in some fixtures.

      I stopped buying CFLs because in the winter they take forever to reach brightness (horrible for a bathroom) and they are a bigger environmental mess to dispose of than incandescents. LEDs have potential, but I don't understand the reasoning for a complete ban when the new technology is not a suitable replacement in 100% of use scenarios.

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

        It's a shame manufactures say that because it mostly isn't true. The issue is heat but if you use low wattage bulbs it won't be a problem. You can get some designed for recessed fittings but you are correct that something needs to be done. There is no technical issue, just a marketing/arse-covering one.

      • I stopped buying CFLs because in the winter they take forever to reach brightness (horrible for a bathroom)

        All depends on the CFL that you buy. The better ones (mid-tier) generally come on at full brightness. Even in environments as cool as 15C.

        The bigger issue with them in the bathroom setting is getting a good daylight color CFL so that everything doesn't look washed out and blue.
  • So what? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by pesho (843750) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:19PM (#45783889)

    "Even though production of 75W and 100W incandescent lamps were phased out earlier this year, many U.S. consumers remain blissfully unaware of The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007

    They will happily swap the burned out bulbs with whatever is available in the store and most of them wouldn't notice much difference. Couple will find that some of the stuff they bought does not work with dimmer switches or some bulbs tend to be a bit bulky and don't fit in certain very tight enclosures. All of those will be swapped for free back in the store with suitable replacements. So what's the point of preparing in advance for the switch or knowing about it?

    Now, the people hoarding incandescent bulbs are a bit more puzzling. Some of them probably have a get-rich-quick plan kicking into action and all I can say is good for them. The ones that are actively trying to avoid switching away from incandescent bulbs are completely different story. WTF people? What's the point of massively inconveniencing yourself with the storage of fragile items only to pay higher electric bills.

    • What's the point of massively inconveniencing yourself with the storage of fragile items only to pay higher electric bills.

      I like the light produced by incandescent lightbulbs. Low color temperature (even lower on the long life incandescent bulbs), spectrum well approximates black body radiation and the bulb is a point source of light (a clear bulb anyway). Halogens are almost as good, but their color temperature is too high for me.

      • by Rhywden (1940872)

        You do realize that the colour spectrum of LEDs is a solved problem, right? And that there's more than one type of LED?

    • by Arker (91948)

      There are many of us in situations where CFLs are not a viable alternative. I tried to switch to them, but they are not at all satisfactory. They are not as bright as they claim to be, and last nowhere near their rated lifetime. This is the experience of many people in my area, and I suspect many people all across the country who live outside of big cities in areas where the power company infrastructure is not completely up to modern standards. And that infrastructure is very unlikely to be upgraded for the

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:20PM (#45783893)

    They are designed to drain our precious bodily fluids.

  • by thegarbz (1787294) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:20PM (#45783901)

    How is this surprising?

    60% of Americans not keeping up with nation politics? Heck didn't 60% not even bother voting at some point? Don't 60% still think the world was made by an omnipotent being in 7 days?

  • by MPAB (1074440) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @06:34PM (#45783983)

    At home the light switches have a dim blue light to be visible in the dark. It seems to be rigged in series with the circuit, so it lights up only when a lightbulb is in the socket. If fluorescent bulbs are installed, they (the bulbs!) will flicker all night long. Also the fluorescent bulbs installed in the bathroom die out very early from the moist. LEDs may be a good solution, but I've yet to find ones that give out enough red tones.

  • by Snufu (1049644) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @07:03PM (#45784115)

    Incandescent technology is far superior to LEDs for electrothermal conversion efficiency. LEDs waste too much energy as visible light.

  • by DrDitto (962751) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @08:12PM (#45784529)
    About 6 years ago I switched over to CFLs. I dealt with the crappy light quality, flicker, and high failure rate. Then my wife broke a CFL literally inches from my 2-year old's face. I'm thinking "meh, I played with mercury thermometers as a kid. big deal". But then I read about vaporized mercury (yes, it goes to solid dust when not pressurized but still) and visited the EPA website which, at the time, recommended I replaced the carpet in the bedroom. Not cool. My wife was in a state of panic over the possible mercury inhaled by our 2-year old. We obviously have no idea about how much mercury he was exposed to. I know that eating several fish is probably equivalent to the same amount of mercury, but there is a difference between inhaled dust and food digested by your stomach. At which point I switched the entire house back to incadescent. And I bought a shitload of 75W and 100W bulbs (probably a 10 year supply). Now granted nowadays I'd just buy LEDs, but cheap LEDs weren't available in 2009-ish. After that experience and given my stock of incadescents, I'm going to keep using incadescents until my stock runs out. I can afford it and I don't a flying fuck about what others think. I do far more to reduce carbon emissions in other ways. That said, I'll only buy a small stock of 40W / 60W. LEDs are good enough nowadays that I see myself switching to those (but you never know when you want a cheap lightbulb for a cheap temporary lamp or something).
    • I think the kid is probably just fine. You, on the other hand, seem to have bitten a mouthful off of the batshit crazy tree.

      I still have and use incandescents (reminds me...need to get some bigger ones), but its mostly for quick start and overall light quality. They don't make 95+CRI CFLs and the last 95CRI LEDs I purchased were $30/ea for 10W (50W equiv) R20s. They're good (unbelievably good at full power, actually), but they do cast an odd light at low dimming, and there's an "on" limit of about 10% of th

  • by pubwvj (1045960) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @09:29PM (#45784933)

    This is a beautiful example of too much government by idiots. What the city slicker politicians and neo-econazies don't understand is that the 100W bulbs are useful. I use them for the combination of heat and light they produce on our farm. They are lower power than the 250W bulbs and thus safer so they're less likely to cause a fire while still providing heat in a creep setting for baby chicks, ducklings and piglets.

    In my home I all of my light bulbs are LED, because I want light. But in the sheds in the winter the heat of the incandescent bulbs is useful.

    If you don't want to buy them then don't. But no need to outlaw them. The law is plain arrogance and fascism.

  • by littlewink (996298) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @10:07PM (#45785109)

    I was president of a condo association for 5 years. I made the costly mistake of replacing all outside incandescent lights with CFLs:

    - all CFLs, regardless of brand, failed within two years. Outdoors CFLs don't last as long as the cheapest incandescents, despite all caterwauling to the contrary. Please don't tell me about your special brand: I've tried it and it failed prematurely.Please don't tell me to return them to the store under the 3-year guarantee: if I did that all my time/gas would be spent driving to/from Home Depot/Lowe's/Light Store and changing bulbs.

    - CFLs were frequently stolen. This was an unanticipated cost.

    LEDs are even worse: thieves can spot an LED from 100 yards away and will stop at nothing to steal them (since they're so damn expensive). Great to spend $300 replacing a weatherproof floodlight receptacle and the electrical tubing because a thief tore it off an outside wall to get a $50 LED floodlight.

    After 3 years I gave up and went back to incandescents, which we will use forever. Savings due to CFLs low electrical usage are not recovered when you include failure and theft in the equation. In fact, incandescents are cheaper even when you include the cost of the rugged models.

    There are good reasons why incandescents have been used for so long. And, as others note, you can heat the chicken coop, keep pipes warm, and do other useful tasks with incandescents. CFLs were a political solution to a non-problem.

  • by Bohnanza (523456) on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @11:52PM (#45785611)
    I can buy fluorescents and LEDs to replace 40 and 60 watt bulbs, but there is still no good replacement for the 100 watt bulb. The "100 watt equivalent" fluorescents are nowhere near as bright, and are so large that they don't properly fit in some fixtures.

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