Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Open Source Cloud Government Software IT

Why The Korean Government Could Go Open Source By 2020 64

Posted by timothy
from the file-formats-matter dept.
An anonymous reader writes As the support for the Microsoft (MS) Windows XP service is terminated this year, the government will try to invigorate open source software in order to solve the problem of dependency on certain software. By 2020 when the support of the Windows 7 service is terminated, it is planning to switch to open OS and minimize damages. Industry insiders pointed out that the standard e-document format must be established and shared as an open source before open source software is invigorated. A similar suggestion that Korea might embrace more open source (but couched more cautiously, with more "should" and "may") is reported on the news page of the EU's program on Interoperability Solutions for European Public Administrations, based on a workshop presentation earlier this month by Korea's Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning. (And at a smaller but still huge scale, the capitol city of Seoul appears to be going in for open source software in a big way, too.)
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Why The Korean Government Could Go Open Source By 2020

Comments Filter:
  • 2020 is a long way away. Politicians usually only have long term vision when they don't want to make decisions about something. So MS will most probably still be strong in Korea by 2020.

    • 2020 is a long way away. Politicians usually only have long term vision when they don't want to make decisions about something. So MS will most probably still be strong in Korea by 2020.

      You are so right, governments woldwide are famous for making quick and timely visions, especially when it involves changing major infrastructure.

      • by tsa (15680)

        Here in the Netherlands we do that all the time. It costs us billions of euros in useless infrastructure and failed ICT projects. Especially with big ICT projects our government has a failure rate of nearly 100%.

    • by rtb61 (674572)

      No bloody way, Samsung, LG and Android say so. Android has been the spear to finally kill the beast of Redmond dominance of the desktop. Many tech companies in Korea will not want the government to subsidise M$ at their triple expense ie paying for it to happen in training at schools and then paying again to retrain those students and paying yet again with regard to all of their interactions with government.

      LG and Samsung are both big on Linux which of course underlies Android and they will want to exten

  • For the most common purposes, like text documents and spreadsheets there is already ODF.
    It is even an ISO standard. Unless there are unexpected problems with things like Asian fonts, that should be a no-brainer.

  • Not a chance (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Corrin Lakeland (3559519) on Saturday June 28, 2014 @01:59AM (#47339199)
    Korea is very tightly wed to Microsoft. I've seen linux on some servers and of course embedded devices, but I have never seen it on the desktop there. A huge amount of the software is Windows only, with both Mac and Linux users completely locked out. It's a pretty conservative, conformist culture - especially at a government level.
    • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

      Korea is very tightly wed to Microsoft. I've seen linux on some servers and of course embedded devices, but I have never seen it on the desktop there. A huge amount of the software is Windows only, with both Mac and Linux users completely locked out. It's a pretty conservative, conformist culture - especially at a government level.

      So you figure that conservatives like that yummy Metro interface along with all the other mutant W8 features?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 28, 2014 @02:00AM (#47339203)

    Last I checked there were at least two Korean governments.

  • Very difficult to do (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Korea (presumably South Korea) is infatuated with Microsoft tech. ActiveX is used everywhere - banks, online shopping, even gateways for various official and private services. Despite the technological marvel that South Korea is at times, Active X & Internet Explorer are the apex of their Internet communications and Linux is basically not used anywhere. For open source to work, there will have to be a complete shakeup of how everyone uses computers and the Internet over there, including non-Government b

    • Korea (presumably South Korea) is infatuated with Microsoft tech. ActiveX is used everywhere

      2020...in Five years they can easily do replace everything...with sanctions and tax breaks even sooner.

    • by tlambert (566799) on Saturday June 28, 2014 @03:34AM (#47339345)

      Also illegal, so far... It's illegal to use something other than the ActiveX plugin authorized by the Korean government to do online banking in South Korea. The current president promised to change things, but so far, nothing has changed. Here's his promise being reported:

      http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/So... [wikinews.org]

      The problem is that Korea requires use of their own national encryption standard, which has a governmental back door (and for which exploits have already been demonstrated at BlackHat) in order to "secure" banking transactions from snooping by foreign powers (guess they called that one correctly).

      Here are some other articles about where the plugin is required to establish secure communications channels:

      http://gadgets.ndtv.com/intern... [ndtv.com]
      http://www.washingtonpost.com/... [washingtonpost.com]
      https://www.techdirt.com/artic... [techdirt.com]

      • I do believe the current president is a her
        • by gtall (79522)

          Yep, Park Geun-hye. I'll bet she can arm-wrestle the Dear Dumpling from N. Korea to a win.

    • Despite the technological marvel that South Korea is at times, Active X & Internet Explorer are the apex of their Internet communications and Linux is basically not used anywhere.

      Android phones are a major exception. Microsoft has negligible presence in Korea on handsets. Other exceptions are the usual ones: data centers, routers, tvs, etc etc.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Am I seriously the only one annoyed that people say "Korea" (the peninsula) when they mean "the Republic of Korea" (South Korea), or rarely, "the People's Republic of Korea" (North Korea)? When I hear people mention they enjoyed their trip to Korea, I ask how they liked Pyongyang.

    • by nukenerd (172703)
      No.

      I followed the first link in TFA ("Korea IT News") to find out, and even that did not tell me. Then I noticed a reference to "the capital city of Seoul" in the last line, but it was not clear that it did not relate to a different story. Even assuming Seoul was the capital concerned, I confess that I could not remember whether it was North or the South (not being American, I am not as close to the subject) so I went to Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] and, incredibly, even that does not tell you.
    • It's always the RoK when people just say Korea. If a news organization is talking about North Korea they will specifically spell out that NORTH Korea did XYZ. It's analogous to having two Bobs in one house. One's an average dude, while the other locks himself in his room, stepping out every once in awhile to brag about how awesome his 2" penis is. In everyday conversions, they'll be Bob and crazy Bob.

  • Is Tizen the "OS of everything" part of the plan ... this would make sense Anyway there are several flavour of opensource and I am wondering what OSS could mean over there ... See you again in 2020 ...
  • Open Source will thrive when documents mandate that every device must be accompanied by a document describing how this will be programmed. In other way you buy an NVIDIA card or an smart phone and you get a PDF that gives detailed specification of how software can use the device (not how it is manufactured) to get the advertised functionality. this should extended to all sub-components that interact with the software. Using undocumented functionality should be illegal since it is a means to provide illegal
  • by Anonymous Coward

    MS has their programmers and then their designers. The linux world is missing designers. Linux needs an intuitive and stable DE. All DE's that I have tried are buggy and feels like I'm running windows 98.

  • by bradgoodman (964302) on Saturday June 28, 2014 @12:24PM (#47341153) Homepage
    Kool Korea, or Krazy Korea?

EARTH smog | bricks AIR -- mud -- FIRE soda water | tequila WATER

Working...