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Tim O'Reilly On Big Data, CS Education, and the Future of Print 26

M-Saunders writes: How do we take advantage of big data without putting our privacy at risk? Should everyone be able to code? And how much life is still in the market for printed books and publications? Linux Voice put these questions to Tim O'Reilly, the founder of O'Reilly media, and the man who helped to popularize the terms Open Source and Web 2.0. ("Should everybody be a professional coder? No way. Should everybody be able to do more than just use a GUI? Absolutely. Should people be able to automate operations of a computer? Absolutely.") Despite the amount of "free" (or advert-supported) content out there, O'Reilly still believes there's plenty of money to be made: "I think that the willingness of people to pay for things that delight them will not go away."
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Tim O'Reilly On Big Data, CS Education, and the Future of Print

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  • Price matters. (Score:4, Informative)

    by geekmux ( 1040042 ) on Friday February 20, 2015 @12:55PM (#49095471)

    "I think that the willingness of people to pay for things that delight them will not go away."

    That's an interesting theory.

    Tell everyone that ad-supported hardware will be going away, and that new fancy cell phone will cost $900 on top of the contract.

    App stores will no longer subsidize with advertising, so you will pay for every app that delights you.

    Yes, let's just see how much willingness is still out there.

    • by Alrescha ( 50745 )

      "Tell everyone that ad-supported hardware will be going away, and that new fancy cell phone will cost $900 on top of the contract."

      The problem with your statement is that it implies that there is someone other than the consumer who pays for advertising.

      If advertising went away tomorrow, the aggregate cost of all goods sold would go down as a result (and we would stop paying for crap that *nobody* wants).

      A.

    • by mjm1231 ( 751545 )

      "I think that the willingness of people to pay for things that delight them will not go away."

      That's an interesting theory.

      Tell everyone that ad-supported hardware will be going away, and that new fancy cell phone will cost $900 on top of the contract.

      T-Mobile, for one, already does this. They offer plans with no contracts and no subsidized phones. You can purchase any phone they sell through their stores and have the price divided up into monthly payments. If you don't like any of those phones, you can purchase any compatible phone with a sim card slot, from any seller you want. I've used prepaid monthly plan phones from Wal-mart, and at one time I was using a jailbroken iPhone 4 made for another carrier. I've got 5 phones on this plan, and I think the

  • But there’s one quote in particular that resonates with us here at Linux Voice. It was partly responsible for the inception of the magazine, and it’s one we think encapsulates the spirit of open source: “Create more value than you capture.

    This "philosophy" has ZERO to do with open source. When people vote with their wallets, they're saying that what they pay for is worth at least as much as what they're paying. This applies to everything in the marketplace.

    People will say "but open source creates more value because it's shared." Not to the millions who pay for closed-source programs and operating systems, obviously, and they're still in the majority.

    And then there's the "it's open, so you can see, audit, and modify the code." Most users

  • by mariox19 ( 632969 ) on Friday February 20, 2015 @01:38PM (#49095769)

    Let me guess, Mr. O'Reilly: $70 programming books as the norm.

He's dead, Jim.

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