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DRM Media Microsoft Software The Internet

Microsoft Edge, HTML5, and DRM 140

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft is building its new browser, Edge, with the intention of avoiding many of the flaws that plagued Internet Explorer over its long and tumultuous life. Part of this involves moving away from plug-ins, and Edge will not support ActiveX. Instead, they're focusing on interoperable media, and that means non-plug-in video players that meet HTML5 specs. Of course, not all video players want to disseminate their content for free, which means: DRM. Microsoft's Edge team has published a new post explaining how they'll be handling support for DRM and "premium media" in the new browser.

They say, "Windows 10 and Microsoft Edge support DASH, MSE, EME and CENC natively, and other major browsers ship implementations of MSE and CENC compliant EME. This support allows developers to build plug-in free web video apps that runs across a huge range of platforms and devices, with each MSE/EME implementation built on top of a different media pipeline and DRM provider. In the days when DRM systems used proprietary file formats and encryption methods, this variation in DRM providers by browser would have presented a significant issue. With the development and use of Common Encryption (CENC), the problem is substantially reduced because the files are compressed in standard formats and encrypted using global industry standards. The service provider issues the keys and licenses necessary to consume the content in a given browser, but the website code, content and encryption keys are common across all of them, regardless of which DRM is in use."
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Microsoft Edge, HTML5, and DRM

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  • by turkeydance ( 1266624 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @07:06PM (#50045595)
    DRM and all that.
    • by ganjadude ( 952775 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @07:16PM (#50045633) Homepage
      they spend all this time on writing DRM code... which will be blown out within a week anyway why not better spend that money and time working on actually making the browser better????
      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 04, 2015 @07:49PM (#50045733)

        The XBox One has been out, nothing approaching a break, and the XBox 360 will get killed off XBL the second someone sticks a modded ROM on there.

        As for Windows, seen an activation crack for W2012 R2 or W2012, or even W8? Even fake KMS servers don't last long (a few hours at most).

        MS in the DRM department is doing quite well.

        • what are you talking about??? ive been running my original xbox modded for like 10 years now
        • The XBox One has been out, nothing approaching a break, and the XBox 360 will get killed off XBL the second someone sticks a modded ROM on there.

          As for Windows, seen an activation crack for W2012 R2 or W2012, or even W8? Even fake KMS servers don't last long (a few hours at most).

          I've been playing copied games on xbox live for a while on the xbox 360. You just use an xk3y and make sure to run the ripped ISO image through abg360. It's been working perfectly for over 3 years, and Microsoft is well aware of it yet hasn't been able to do anything to stop it.

      • by Z80a ( 971949 )

        They must pretend the thing is safe to placate the fury of the big studios, or else.
        Of course, this don't mean the thing must actually work, just sound harsh enough.

      • by lgw ( 121541 )

        they spend all this time on writing DRM code... which will be blown out within a week anyway why not better spend that money and time working on actually making the browser better????

        No one's going to bother breaking the DRM on a video stream. Why bother? If you want the content without paying, torrent it, rather than messing with streams with quality/bitrate that can change for reasons outside your control.

        Plus, since normal people don't care at all about DRM nerdwhining, they just want it to play when they click, arguably MS is improving the user experience here. Ideally, they'd include a native module letting you right-click on any DRMd stream and automatically torrent it while yo

        • by Bert64 ( 520050 ) <bert@@@slashdot...firenzee...com> on Sunday July 05, 2015 @04:09AM (#50046981) Homepage

          People will crack streamed DRM if there is content that's either only available there, or is available there first... If you look at most torrent sites these days you will see all kinds of content that has been ripped from streaming media sites, all of which used DRM and yet still got cracked and made available in a more convenient form via torrents.

          • by lgw ( 121541 )

            Fair enough, I wasn't thinking about TV shows, and obviously that's how a lot of people still watch GoT, after HBO so cleverly spent years forcing a bunch of people who wanted to pay to instead torrent. How common is that though? I'm struggling to think of other examples.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          No one's going to bother breaking the DRM on a video stream. Why bother?

          I would imagine there are plenty of people who are willing to pay for the service, but:

          - want (for any number of reasons) to use their preferred video player rather than the site's lousy Javascript interface
          - want to cache the entire video before watching it, rather than having it interrupted by unpredictable network delays
          - want to watch it in higher quality than is possible for their network connection to stream in real time

          That's wit

  • No way in hell (Score:4, Insightful)

    by stevez67 ( 2374822 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @07:08PM (#50045601)

    What they're glossing over with their review is that adblocker extensions, password managers, extensions that prevent video from autoplaying and etc. will not be available. And I won't use Edge because if I can't control the behavior of my web browser I won't use that web browser.

    • Re:No way in hell (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Lennie ( 16154 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @07:19PM (#50045641)

      How do you mean no extensions ?

      Now I don't know what Edge will support or does support, but the first article I found looking on Google for Microsoft Edge extensions tells me they support:
      http://imacros.net/microsoft-e... [imacros.net]

      "Edge will have extensions, “Javascript and HTML based” – essentially very much like Chrome. No C# support."

      This means, similar model to Firefox and Chrome. Actually, many extensions work in both.

      Maybe you are confusing plugins with extensions.

      Plugins are like Flash, Java applets, Acrobat Reader all that stuff.

      You know the stuff that is usually the least secure in most currently deployed browsers.

      • Re:No way in hell (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 04, 2015 @07:45PM (#50045715)
        Posting AC as I'm not sure this is public, but MS has told their corporate partners that the plugin APIs will not be ready when Windows 10 releases, and they have given no date other than 'after release.'
      • by Anonymous Coward

        All the stuff that needs weekly security updates, even though they are just for browsing the web..

      • Re:No way in hell (Score:4, Interesting)

        by mlts ( 1038732 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @08:01PM (#50045761)

        Here is the big question: How do the plugins (Flash, Shockwave, Java, Acrobat, DRM video players) run? Are they running in the same context as the browser (like current IE), run in a separate process (like Firefox), or run in a more isolated VM where each tab and window is in its memory space (Chrome)?

        The Web browser is the first source of attack, and one of the primary means for malware to get on a system. Even with the low security context that IE had starting in Vista, that wasn't sufficient for isolation. It almost takes running the browser in a sandbox (sandboxie) or a complete VM (with its own filesystem) to protect a machine against browser weaknesses, just because a browser is always in constant contact with untrusted code.

        I hope MS designs Edge with a lot more isolation (so a compromised add-on in one window can't attack another window or tab), because when designing a new browser is the only real time that they can do it right with security, as opposed to reactively fight fires, as with IE.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          The web is increasingly moving away from the need for such plugins and schemes, so that browsers can simply have ONE good security context in ONE runtime that can run anything you need it to, similar to how PNaCl was supposed to work (only actually designed in such a way that you can migrate your existing browser tech over rather than having to adopt everything Chromium). Things like the sandboxing model JS uses, CORS, various hardware-accessing standards, and the upcoming WebAssembly are all the direction

          • by mlts ( 1038732 )

            I hope that is the case. The fewer plug-ins, the better. Right now, if I wanted to watch a video on a web page, it may be in HTML5, it might be HTML+DRM, it may be in Quicktime, it might be in Silverlight, Java, RealAudio, or of course, Flash.

            Even if we dispensed with all the plugins and the world magically ran on standards built in all browsers, there are always still security issues. Especially if they give any website it touches full access to hardware, which means it has the option of reflashing firm

            • Not direct hardware access per se, but we'll end up with OpenGL and even OpenCL code running if all goes like planned, under other names such as WebGL, WebCL. That may effect a pseudo denial-of-service through driver crash or overheating, or lead to a web page increasing your power consumption by 100 watts. Perhaps some javascript you automatically run will steal your CPU/GPU cycles for someone to profit from.

              I don't know about security issues, seems like the GPU, its firmware and its driver are security ch

      • How do you mean no extensions ?

        He didn't say "no extensions". He said,

        adblocker extensions, password managers, extensions that prevent video from autoplaying and etc. will not be available

        I can imagine Microsoft not allowing certain extensions if they will affect their "strategic partners".

        • Re:No way in hell (Score:5, Insightful)

          by bmo ( 77928 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @09:53PM (#50046111)

          He didn't say "no extensions". He said,

          adblocker extensions, password managers, extensions that prevent video from autoplaying and etc. will not be available

          That may as well be "no extensions" for most people, because those are the most useful ones that get installed first with a new browser.

          So fuck him, and fuck his browser. And fuck his company. No, really, if he wants to be that user-hostile, he can take his stuff and shove it straight up his own arse.

          --
          BMO

          • So fuck him, and fuck his browser. And fuck his company.

            Oh, I'm with you. I learned long ago with Microsoft that you use what parts work, jettison the rest. It's actually taught me a good lesson about technology: Never fall in love with a company. Also, when it comes to technology, "ABS": Always Be Suspicious.

            • Never fall in love with a company.

              Well said. The only love we should be giving companies is the money we use to pay for their products. At the same time we should always demand the best quality possible for that money.

        • well those specific extensions are the first ones I install so if i cant use them, edge will not even be an option on my radar
      • by jonwil ( 467024 )

        What hasn't been said by Microsoft is whether or not all extensions need to go through the official Windows store (and be approved by Microsoft) or whether it will be possible to produce extensions that can be installed directly from non-MS websites and hence not need approval from MS.

        • by KGIII ( 973947 )

          That is one thing that Microsoft has usually been pretty good about. They will let you install stuff from anywhere you want. They have not really had much of a walled garden approach to anything except things that they have, themselves, hosted on behalf of third parties. So I suspect the various add-ons will be available (and probably directly through Microsoft's site) even if you have to go to a third party site and download them.

          • by jonwil ( 467024 )

            Windows RT and Windows Phone both have walled gardens and only let you install from the Microsoft store.

            • by KGIII ( 973947 )

              That is why I said "pretty good" instead of "ideal" or "perfect." Also, I thought you could tick a box and install outside apps with Windows Phone? I never bought one so I have no idea if that is true. I could have sworn it was just a checkbox and it opened it up like Androids usually have.

    • What they're glossing over with their review is that adblocker extensions, password managers, extensions that prevent video from autoplaying and etc. will not be available.

      And what you're glossing over is that extensions will be available, just not immediately at release. You're criticising somebody for telling a half-truth and then doing exactly that yourself.

      They have even detailed the process [imacros.net] for creating extensions for Edge.

      And I won't use Edge because if I can't control the behavior of my web browser I won't use that web browser.

      Ok. You're a minority, most people don't worry about controlling Safari (OSX or iOS) or Chrome or Firefox, they just use the vendor binary.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Of course, not all video players want to disseminate their content for free"

      The usual crap, since when does a video player decide whether content is free or not? supporting DRM playback is not the same as forcing DRM on content. The video player plays no part in whether the content is free or not, that is the content providers, the player just supports the playback.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I read a few years ago how Netflix,Hulu and Amazon were all going big time to HTML5 but so far its not been a fast as they claimed. About the only one embracing HTML5 in a big way has been YouTube. You even see plenty of Flash content around and Silverlight even though Google Chrome has basically snubbed Silverlight in Chrome and even Microsoft says Edge won't use Silverlight. One has to wonder how this will frustrate some users who are not tech savvy and wonder why their content won't work? All browsers ar

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Google's stewardship of web video has been the primary reason for these delays and frustrations. Not only have they been dicking around with HTML5 video, changing how it works every 6 months and screwing with YouTube in ways that make other browsers often look bad "just 'cause", they also paid Adobe to make a Chromium-specific version of Flash on their new plugin API, despite knowing full well that plugins were on the way out, and nobody in their right mind would adopt their plugin interface. So now most br

      • ... flaky HTML5 video support ...

        huh?

        <video width="512" height="297" controls autoplay style="outline: none;">
        <source src="video.webm" type="video/webm">
        <source src="movie.mp4" type="video/mp4" />
        <source src="movie.ogg" type="video/ogg" />
        </video>

        The above has worked for several years now.

        The default video tag supports full screen view.

        Youtube's thingy does not. Why not? What's the problem?

    • You even see plenty of Flash content around

      That's in part because it took so long to make visual editors for animated SVG and HTML5 Canvas that were comparable to Flash MX, let alone Flash CS. And Edge Animate, the HTML5 animation tool from the maker of Flash, is available only on a rental model, not a purchase model. So things like animutations and Weebl's Stuff still tend to depend on Flash.

      • People still use flash? How quaint.

        I uninstalled flash almost 2 years ago now. Haven't missed out on anything.

        • How would you know? If the page substitutes static content when if finds you don't have Flash installed, how do you know what you are missing?
          • I think you misunderstand - for most people, static content is far preferable. We dont want anything that moves unless we click on it, and probably not even then!
            • I think you misunderstand - for most people, static content is far preferable. We dont want anything that moves unless we click on it, and probably not even then!

              No, you misunderstand. There's a lot of middle ground between static content and bombastic, flamboyant advertising.

    • HTML5 video is some kind of moving target? I remember how years ago on slashdot it was about some raw video streaming with the universal ability of doing a right-click and "save as". But then it needed DRM. And then, it sucks because you want the ability to change video stream on the fly depending on bandwith. So you have "MSE", which is bleeding edge. Meaning unfinished, not supported, perhaps has the potential to up the CPU hungriness again.
      Whatever, give me something that works in flash 11.2, it "only" r

  • by Anonymous Coward

    July 31, 2012

    Microsoft (MS) began encrypting web-based chat with the introduction of the new outlook.com service. This new Secure Socket Layer (SSL) encryption effectively cut off collection of the new service for FAA 702 and likely 12333 (to some degree) for the Intelligence Community (IC). MS, working with the FBI, developed a surveillance capability to deal with the new SSL. These solutions were successfully tested and went live 12 Dec 2012. The SSL solution was applied to all current FISA and 702/PRISM

  • Sadly, I'm not compatible with DRM so I guess I can't use that new browser.

    • Sadly, I'm not compatible with DRM so I guess I can't use that new browser.

      It's not about you.

      The mainstream browser that doesn't support protected media play is damn near extinct.

      The browser itself is under threat of being eclipsed by the walled gardens of the mobile, app-oriented, world. Imagine if Netflix began adding live news and sports feeds to its streaming media content.

    • I am a Windows 10 Preview User. I got a separate app to download the music I want. I then play it offline under Microsoft Video. I even transfer it to my other tablets, in case I want to watch it there.

      I don't use the browser itself for DRM stuff, and I'm glad that Edge is a good lightweight alternative. For Windows 10, I'd use both Edge and IE.

  • "Edge" (Score:5, Funny)

    by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @08:52PM (#50045903) Journal

    Who comes up with these idiotic names? Why not "Microsoft Nail" or "Microsoft Lance" or "Microsoft Thing That Penetrates"?

    "Microsoft Edge" is a very '90s name to my ears, but maybe it's just the fact that I've been sitting on the porch drinking, eating barbecue and watching fireworks for the past several hours. But Microsoft was never really good at names, although I did once have a three-legged dog named "Clippy" (that's actually true).

    • Re:"Edge" (Score:4, Informative)

      by neilo_1701D ( 2765337 ) on Saturday July 04, 2015 @09:21PM (#50045989)

      They wanted a name starting with "E", to keep a stylized blue "e" as an icon. Given that Windows 10 windows are essentially frameless, the browser viewing area is edge-to-edge, hence "Edge".

      The idea was to keep the icon as familiar as possible.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by PopeRatzo ( 965947 )

        They wanted a name starting with "E", to keep a stylized blue "e" as an icon. Given that Windows 10 windows are essentially frameless, the browser viewing area is edge-to-edge, hence "Edge".

        Then I think "Microsoft E" would have been a better name, invoking the drug that you'd have to be high on to want to use that browser.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Then that is a fail right there. They wanted to change the name from IE because of its bad reputation but if they still want people to relate back to the icon it's not going to get them very far.

        • by Phroggy ( 441 )

          Then that is a fail right there. They wanted to change the name from IE because of its bad reputation but if they still want people to relate back to the icon it's not going to get them very far.

          They only want people who are at least slightly tech-savvy to think it's a totally new browser. They want stupid people who don't know anything to think it's the same old browser they're already familiar with. Changing the name while keeping the icon seems like a good way to accomplish these goals.

      • I updated the Windows 10 preview to the last build and saw an icon that looked very much like that of Internet Explorer. Turns out is the icon of Edge.
        I find it funny they've worked so hard so as not to alienate the users who think the "blue e" is the Internet but thought it was ok to radically change the interface in Windows 8. In Windows 10 they've half-backtracked by including a stripped-down Start Menu but that would also completely confuse someone who's confused if the Internet changes its icon from
        • I find it funny they've worked so hard so as not to alienate the users who think the "blue e" is the Internet but thought it was ok to radically change the interface in Windows 8.

          Windows 8 was lead by Steven Sinofsky, described as someone with the maniacal power and force of will of a Steve Jobs ... lacking Jobs' best gift: An innate understanding of good design [winsupersite.com].

          After Windows 8, Sinofsky didn't work at Microsoft anymore. Now Microsoft have to deal with his legacy: some good and some bad. The result is Windows 10, led by Gabe Aul.

          I actually don't mind the Windows 10 Start menu. It's a good compromise between the Windows 95 - Windows 7 concepts and the Windows 8 Start screen. It c

    • by tepples ( 727027 ) <tepples@ g m a i l .com> on Saturday July 04, 2015 @09:48PM (#50046091) Homepage Journal

      Who comes up with these idiotic names?

      I don't know who, but I do know when. IE 8 introduced the X-ua-compatible header [microsoft.com]. "Use the following value to display the webpage in edge mode, which is the highest standards mode supported by Internet Explorer."

      • I don't know who, but I do know when. IE 8 introduced...

        Oh great. IE8. That's some special lineage on which to base the identity of their new browser.

        • Oh great. IE8. That's some special lineage on which to base the identity of their new browser.

          And I'm sure so many people are going to get hung up on that!

    • It's no worse than the rest of the browser names. Except for Internet Explorer and Netscape they are all bloody aweful, Who the fuck thought of names like Opera, firefox, lynx, Safari, chrome (actually while I hate the browser it is about the best name of the rest considering you can sort of associate the web as a safari).
  • what a ridiculous waste of effort. The DRM will be broken by pirates within months, if not weeks, of release, and eventually rendered useless, but meanwhile, regular users will get screwed when the shoddy implementations make the user experience suck.

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