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Google-Supported CodeGirl Documentary Makes "Exclusive YouTube Premiere" 289

theodp writes: As part of our Made with Code and media perception initiatives," wrote YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki over at the Official Google Blog, "I'm excited that we're supporting award-winning documentary filmmaker Lesley Chilcott — of An Inconvenient Truth and Waiting for Superman [and Code.org] fame — on her next film, CodeGirl. Until November 5 Lesley's film will be available for free on YouTube, before its theatrical debut in the next few weeks." Microsoft is pretty jazzed about the movie too, as is Al Gore. Decidedly less excited about CodeGirl is film critic Inkoo Kang, who writes, "CodeGirl, a chronicle of this year's Technovation contest, is just as well-intentioned as its subject. It coasts for as long as it can on the feel-good fuel of watching smart, earnest girls talk about creating an app, but with virtually no tension, context, narrative or characterization driving the story, the documentary grows to feel like a parent describing their daughter's involvement in an international competition. The girls' achievements are impressive, but you definitely don't want to hear about them for nearly two hours.
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Google-Supported CodeGirl Documentary Makes "Exclusive YouTube Premiere"

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  • Sheesh Dice... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DoofusOfDeath ( 636671 ) on Thursday November 05, 2015 @08:14AM (#50869877)

    Is Thursday the new Friday?

  • Film Critic (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 05, 2015 @08:44AM (#50870007)

    The documentary is too long. 90% of the time you see a group of girls giggling and chatting about non issues (clichees are confirmed).
    Two nerdy girls solve Rubic Cube with one hand (that's the only memorizable part for me).
    They speak about coding, but you don't see anyone really coding, they just have the laptop and type (could be chatting or emailing).
    The coding is about mobile applications - if you expect to see a diagram how things are setup, nothing.

    The documentary communicates: teenage girls can develop apps (one has to assume this as it's not really shown), even with a social agenda and not just hype something meaningless to earn money. The documentary looks at teams competing for some price to win, training to present their ideas - it's close to a meaningless reality show. Topic-wise interesting, as documentary it falls short in my eyes, all remains on the surface. All girls are treated like props, no personality of anyone is explored sufficiently, no history, too many faces, too little depth.

    A (interesting) topic cannot carry a documentary alone.

    • SJW's applaud documentary that shows teenage girls giggling and acting vacuous instead of actually learning and accomplishing something.

      Way to advance the cause, dipshits. Now people are SURE to take women coders seriously.

    • by KGIII ( 973947 )

      It's probably not impossible but it's likely damned difficult and counterproductive to design a mobile app with something as basic and featureless as Scratch. MIT did not make Scratch for coding anything useful, really. I mean, I've played with it and I suppose you could. I don't think it's practical. The code that they show them working on is in Scratch.

  • by Qbertino ( 265505 ) <moiraNO@SPAMmodparlor.com> on Thursday November 05, 2015 @08:47AM (#50870021)

    I'm all for asking women to move into tech jobs - we have too little of them. But I think this documentary sends the wrong message. Girls building one-shot girlie apps isn't very flattering a proposition for women in tech.

    They should've done a really good documentary on Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper and perhaps some current day programmers doing serious and exciting work.

    I was at the Google Polymer Summit a few weeks ago and there were some young women there, some of them high-profile software developers - a length interview with those would give off a much better impression of what type of women in tech we all want. One of the ladies was on the chrome team working on the rendering and DOM engine - I can barely image what a hardcore coding job that is.

    And yes, they did look girlie and quite cute actually. Makeup, high-heels, elaborate hair-do. No problem here. The point I'm making is that they were *coding* serious stuff. You can be into cupcakes, pink pettycoats, pigtails and hello kitty and still do that.
    Heck, our male coder type digs nerf guns and is all exited about the new star wars like a nine-year old at the age of 40 - like that's anymore grown-up a pastime. ...

    I could be wrong, but I do think we have to move the coding women doing the serious stuff on to the stage - that would give off a better impression.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Have you seen the film? The girls look girly. It's not just one-shot apps, they are talking about a general interest in making apps etc. While I agree that some history will be inspiring, I think actually making some useful apps that have real world applications in their home towns and countries is worthwhile and serious work. I know what you are saying, but there is time for the more hard core CS stuff when they are older.

    • I'm all for asking women to move into tech jobs - we have too little of them. But I think this documentary sends the wrong message. Girls building one-shot girlie apps isn't very flattering a proposition for women in tech.

      Some times the whole thing sounds a little like the ladies down at Curves ( a women only gym) complaining about men excluding them.

      They should've done a really good documentary on Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper and perhaps some current day programmers doing serious and exciting work.

      Or Hedy LaMarr, who had the side benefit of being so beautiful, she could destroy the "homely smart girl with glasses" stereotype instantly Aside from he acting career, she was an inventor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org] the most well known invention in conjunction with another person, of frequency hopping spread spectrum radio.

      But back to women in science in general, Mari

    • by MacTO ( 1161105 )

      Or simply create documentaries focusing upon more balanced development teams.

      I can definitely see how many people would think that programming is indifferent or hostile to women. Online, those who bellow loudest tend to have sexist attitudes (one way or the other). If you look at documentaries, a lot of them are dominated by men to the point that the inclusion of women frequently appears to be a token gesture. While the groups being featured may be dominated by men, it certainly does not present an impre

      • Is the answer to that problem the sexism showed in this film? It is extraordinarily sexist to imply that women are so weak that they need other people to fight for them.

    • I could be wrong, but I do think we have to move the coding women doing the serious stuff on to the stage - that would give off a better impression.

      Unfortunately, this wouldn't fit into the narrative that women are being pushed away from these fields. The narrative is more important than the truth that there already are women in tech, and no one is out pushing women away from tech.

  • feel-good fuel of watching smart, earnest girls talk about creating an app

    did they actually make an app, and was it anything worth making?

  • It's great that some interested girls got to learn some stuff. It's not so great that some interested boys didn't.

  • I think I'll stick with codebabes

    https://www.youtube.com/user/C... [youtube.com]

  • Issue a DMCA takedown notice. It's easy to submit one and not so easy to dispute it. And Youtube will comply because it's staffed by drones.

  • Tension makes things more interesting, but if you set out to document something that's happening *right now* (as opposed to, say, some event in history that you already know was really tense), the *correct* way to document it is to document the truth. This is actually the responsible thing to do.

    A few years ago, there was some indie game making contest reality show, and the people doing the show decided to *create drama* by asking one team if they felt that the other team was at a disadvantage because they

  • I dunno, the video mentioned the use of pink and cookies. I want my cookies.

Uncertain fortune is thoroughly mastered by the equity of the calculation. - Blaise Pascal

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