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Android Open Source Encryption Microsoft Privacy Security Software News Build Hardware Technology

CyanogenMod 13.0 Release 1 Released (androidpolice.com) 54

An anonymous reader writes: CyanogenMod 13.0 Release 1 is now available as the Android community's first release based off Google's 6.0 Marshmallow. [...]
Not long after Google released the code for Android Marshmallow, CyanogenMod started rolling out nightly builds. Now, CyanogenMod has officially released its first Snapshot release for those looking for more stable development. Many of the improvements detail changes to the privacy settings. For example, CyanogenMod 13.0 has removed encrypted Whisperpush text messaging, and Privacy Guard has been altered to comply with Marshmallow's new permission model. Some other changes include a new AOSP SMS/MMS application, memory screen that shows memory usage over a selected period of time, new controls for the status bar icons, and an enhanced Snap camera app based on Qualcomm's Snapdragon camera. A Cyanogen Apps pack is not yet available, but should be coming in a week or so.
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CyanogenMod 13.0 Release 1 Released

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Can I run CyanogenMod as the main OS on my PC? I currently use Debian GNU/Linux but I'm getting very disappointed with it all. Systemd has caused me nothing but trouble, GNOME 3 is awful, Wayland is going nowhere fast, and desktop Firefox keeps getting worse and worse.

    But I'm really happy with my Android phone. It gives me the kind of experience I want: graphical, simple, and efficient. I would absolutely LOVE it if I could ditch Debian from my PC, and run Android or ideally CyanogenMod instead. I like how

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Why's that at -1? Looks like a reasonable question to meâ¦

    • by J053 ( 673094 )

      Not CyanogenMod, but you could try Remix OS [jide.com] - I've run it in a QEMU+KVM virtual machine, and it looks pretty nice.

  • by c.r.o.c.o ( 123083 ) on Wednesday March 16, 2016 @06:23PM (#51711417)

    For those of us that do not sync with Google, or as is my case, do not have any Google services or apps, the new messaging app is worse than the previous one.

    The CM12 messaging app allowed all SMS/MMS to be exported as a zip file, that could be imported to another phone, or to the same phone after a clean wipe. The CM13 messaging app is missing this functionality, and I could not find another one that would replicate it.

    Otherwise, CM13 is pretty solid. I've been running the nightlies since they came out on an LG G3 d852, which is a bit of a crappy phone, and it is much more stable than CM12. I do like the new camera app, as it has a lot more functionality than the old one, and the OS overall is a bit more polished.

    YMMV, as it really depends on the hardware. I'm sure on a Nexus 5p or 6x, CM13 is stellar. On my frankenstein LG G3, it's ok, as I am forced to run a KK bootloader (only rootable bootloader), a LL modem (most recent modem released by the Canadian carriers) and a MM CM13 OS.

  • For some reason the CM releases have had immense problems with implementing full-disk encryption over the years. It just doesn't work, not even on popular flagship models.

    On my Galaxy S3 (CM11) I was once able to encrypt my phone, but it would only allow the use of either a PIN or password – and CM also wiped the user data clean one day by itself. The use of a password is very much desirable per se, but the thing is you'd have to enter it every time you unlock the screen. A PIN is as secure as leaving your phone with a post-it note on it with the actual PIN written on it.

    After trying the new CM13 nightlies on my Galaxy S5, I'm still having problems with full-disk encryption. This time around it won't encrypt at all, and even if it would, the aforementioned limitations with the password/PIN are still present. In the newer version you theoretically could use a pattern too, but it's still not secure enough (nor does the whole damn encryption work to begin with).

    It's been discussed for several years now how people could have a secure FDE key and a also use a pattern or PIN to unlock the screen. For some god-knows-why reason the password has also been limited to 16 characters in the official Android documentation and nobody came up with the idea to actually increase that. Having experimented with encryption on my Android/CM devices, I have to say that security never really was a key feature in the whole damn ecosystem.

    • Rooted Android can already combine a pin screen lock and password for FDE. Cm11 had it built in. For CM12 or stock Android with root, there are apps that can set the FDE password, or you could do it via command line over adb if you want to spend 15 minutes to figure out the right syntax.

      • Rooted Android can already combine a pin screen lock and password for FDE. Cm11 had it built in.

        It was indeed "possible", but it was not a supported solution like it is not one even in the current releases. Manually decoupling the FDE password and screen lock means trouble, especially when you update the phone. I once tried this approach, but eventually it wouldn't accept the FDE password upon boot any more even though the password had not been changed. Getting this stuff to work properly is a hassle.

        • When you change the screen-lock PIN, the FDE password will be reset as well. Are you sure that that isn't what happened?

          But yes, I admit that I have had my problems, too. When I updated my nexus 7 (2012) from stock 4.4.4 to 5 lollipop, I got the boot message: something went wrong with the encrypted data partition. Factory reset needed. Grrrrr.... That's when I moved to Cyanogenmod.

          • Yes, I'm sure it wasn't a case of resetting the password. I was simply rebooting the phone every now and then and then it suddenly wouldn't accept the FDE password any more. I've read about similar cases and it's probably not even a bug, but a feature somewhere in the OS that somehow overwrote the password because something specific happened in the OS.

            I really hope one day we'll get a proper encryption suit in Android. Supported, easy to use and secure. :-\

    • by thegarbz ( 1787294 ) on Thursday March 17, 2016 @04:38AM (#51713517)

      A PIN is as secure as leaving your phone with a post-it note on it with the actual PIN written on it.

      You should submit that as expert advice in the current Apple vs Three Letter Agency debate case.

      For some god-knows-why reason the password has also been limited to 16 characters in the official Android documentation and nobody came up with the idea to actually increase that.

      Stupidity protection. You get all sorts of strange issues when you start allowing users to enter stupidly long passwords such as them forgetting them mid typing, timeouts, and my favourite: complaints that they take a long time to enter as it is :-)

      Having experimented with encryption on my Android/CM devices, I have to say that security never really was a key feature in the whole damn ecosystem

      Depends. Are you trying to protect yourself from the NSA, or just want your data encrypted so when you lose your phone no one sees your dick picks? The vast majority of uses cases are the latter and for that it is well and truly good enough.

      • You should submit that as expert advice in the current Apple vs Three Letter Agency debate case.

        You need to remember this is Android we're talking about. Most Android devices lack any real hardware or software security infrastructure, which means you have infinite tries. In many cases you could also brute force the whole thing offline by dumping the contents of the phone on a computer. Even in Apple's case, though, the PIN is incredibly weak. If apple decides to help, it means there's practically no protection for the data. If a long enough password was used instead of a PIN, even with Apple's help th

        • I find this type of argument just as fallacious as "if you have nothing to hide...".

          I wasn't implying that. More like "if you have nothing super important to hide from people who are unlikely to be a threat against you..."

          I'm a good proponent of encryption and privacy, but honestly you hit the point of diminishing returns very quickly with security. Pin code is good enough for most use cases, though I would have to say if you travel to Russia frequently and have something to hide a little physical security sense would be wise. I haven't experienced Russia yet but before I went to China I d

          • I'm a good proponent of encryption and privacy, but honestly you hit the point of diminishing returns very quickly with security.

            True enough. But I think despite this it should be an option for those who want it or need it as it's rather easy to implement such features.

            Here back home? I'm pissed off enough that work enforces that I need a 6 digit pin on my phone. Pattern unlock would be far more convenient.

            From what I have come to understand, PIN and pattern lock can offer comparable protection if configured properly so there really should not be any significant difference in the level of security you get with either choice. The phone should simply refuse any further attempts after the PIN or pattern has been entered incorrectly X times (and if the device has been encryp

            • True enough. But I think despite this it should be an option for those who want it or need it as it's rather easy to implement such features.

              I believe several vendors offer enhancements beyond stock Android, but the problem with Android itself is that it was supposed to be somewhat hardware agnostic. If you're looking for Apple style security then you're going to have to beg Samsung for it not Google. On the side note Samsung did try something along the lines with Samsung Knox but from what I can see the implementation is half arsed (security info stored in plain text) which doesn't surprise me given some of the, excuse my French, FUCKING STUPID

  • I stopped using Cyanogen as their releases have gotten slower and slower. This is an "M" based release 1 after Google has released the preview of "N".

    Cyanogen's releases were faster as a community based fork then they are as a company.

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