Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Microsoft Windows Operating Systems Software News Build Hardware Technology

Microsoft To End Nagging Windows 10 Upgrade Notifications In July (theverge.com) 158

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft has officially announced today it will end the annoying "Get Windows 10" notifications in July, when they end the free Windows 10 upgrade offer. In a statement to WinBeta, Microsoft said in a comment: "Details are still being finalized, but on July 29th the Get Windows 10 app that facilitates the easy upgrade to Windows 10 will be disabled and eventually removed from PCs worldwide. Just as it took time to ramp up and roll out the Get Windows 10 app, it will take time to ramp it down." This is great news for users who have decided to not install Windows 10 for whatever reason. Earlier this week, it was reported that the Windows 10 update has been ruining pro-graming streams. In April, the Windows 10 upgrade screen interrupted a meteorologist's live forecast.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Microsoft To End Nagging Windows 10 Upgrade Notifications In July

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Just installed without asking.

    • Yeah, I doubt that Microsoft is going to end this "Free" update campaign with at least one more attempt to push Windows 10 to everyone's computers like it was a security patch.

  • by SeaFox ( 739806 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:02PM (#52064765)

    They'll probably double-down on re-enabling the "recommended" updates that add the spyware to previous versions of Windows.

    • by DaHat ( 247651 )

      Why would they spend the time? As far as they are concerned, Windows XP/Vista/7/8/8.1 are competitors to Windows 10 which costs them more to maintain and with fewer monetization/expansion options, why would they do anything but encourage you to move to the new great future they believe they have created?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Because they already spent the time to make spyware for Windows 7 and 8 and because data harvesting makes them money.

        • by DaHat ( 247651 )

          Citation?

          And did they add this 'spyware' after the releases of later operating systems?

          • by SeaFox ( 739806 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:42PM (#52064963)

            Citation?

            And did they add this 'spyware' after the releases of later operating systems?

            We don't need to cite that data harvesting makes a company money. It's literally the business plan of several dot-coms.
            As far as them adding the telemetry to earlier versions of Windows, it's common knowledge now.
            http://techne.alaya.net/?p=124... [alaya.net]

            I have personally deselected and hidden these updates only to see them get un-hidden and added automatically as Recommended updates to download and install at a later date. I'd also like to note this had happened more than once with some of these individual updates, and it often happens when I get a large (15-30 updates) list at once from Microsoft. These large groups of updates are not "backed up" updates I have missed since last time. I have Windows Update run as a startup item when I log in to my computer, so I'm manually checking for updates every day on my PC. And every day I get an update for the Windows Defender definitions. But once in awhile I get a dozen or so "important" updates for Windows itself, and it's quite coincidental that one of the updates I had previously hidden is added into that list.

            Seems like a orchestrated attempt to get me to install it. Stick it in a large list, and I'm more likely to just say "install all" than actually read the KBs for each or compare them to a list of known problem ones.

            Tell me, if these updates are so harmless, why is Microsoft so vehement I install them after I tell them once I don't want them?

            • Seems like a orchestrated attempt to get me to install it. Stick it in a large list, and I'm more likely to just say "install all" than actually read the KBs for each or compare them to a list of known problem ones.

              in business, its known as a 'shit sandwich'

              (no, really. it is.)

              • what really matters with a 'shit sandwich' is how much bread you have in it and how thinly the shit is spread....
            • by ljw1004 ( 764174 )

              We don't need to cite that data harvesting makes a company money. It's literally the business plan of several dot-coms.

              Actually, I rather think you do. Those business plans are typically (1) harvest data, (2) ???, (3) profit.

              Sometimes that mystery step (2) is sell it on to advertisers, or use it for targeted advertising. I myself work at Microsoft -- not in the Windows division; our division's product Visual Studio does collect opt-in telemetry, and our missing step (2) is nothing more sinister than "improve the product so that future customers are more likely to want to use it".

              Do you think that mystery step (2) in Windows

              • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

                Do you think that mystery step (2) in Windows is using it for targeted advertising? or something else? I find it hard to make the leap from telemetry like "anonymized data shows Solitaire is the third-most popular program" (made up datapoint) to "targeting ads to this customer is worth $XYZ", but maybe there's something there that I'm just not seeing.

                Maybe you need a Spotlight [theverge.com] to see it better.

                If someone with a tablet hadn't used their stylus, Spotlight might display an image highlighting drawing apps. In his demonstration, Spotlight prompted users to download the Fresh Paint app. That's one of Microsoft's own apps, but Belfiore emphasized that this is about introducing users to the entire Windows ecosystem — a similar app suggestion slot is being placed right in the Start menu, too.

                Oh, look! It's already happening. [howtogeek.com]

                But I'm sure Microsoft did not p

                • by ljw1004 ( 764174 )

                  Oh, look! It's already happening. [howtogeek.com]

                  But I'm sure Microsoft did not profit in any way financially from that ad.

                  Your phrase "not profit financially" is shifting the goalposts. The thread was about whether the telemetry data is being monetized.

                  Your first link was about pointing users, based on their usage, to apps that might might be relevant but they hadn't considered or noticed. Unless and until MS goes down Apple's allegedly planned route of paid app-store search [gamasutra.com], that's not an example.

                  Your second example was about an ad for Tomb Raider being shown on the lock screen. Again, unless the telemetry influenced the deci

                  • Microsoft has to prove what they are doing with their spyware data (it's not "telemetry", stop calling it that) because they encrypt the transfers.

                    Personally, I don't want any data leaving my systems unless I, the user, explicitly tell it to.

                  • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

                    Oh, look! It's already happening. [howtogeek.com]

                    But I'm sure Microsoft did not profit in any way financially from that ad.

                    Your phrase "not profit financially" is shifting the goalposts. The thread was about whether the telemetry data is being monetized.

                    Your first link was about pointing users, based on their usage, to apps that might might be relevant but they hadn't considered or noticed.

                    You're turning this into a semantics argument now. The original comment [slashdot.org] was that Microsoft was collecting info to make money -- we know that what the AC meant that they used the data in an activity (a "step 2") that made money, not that the act of spying itself gained them greenbacks.

                    But here you come [slashdot.org]. "Nuh-uhh! You have to do something with the info to make money.

                    And me [slashdot.org]: "Yeah, they are doing something with the info. Straight from the horses mouth, they use the data to tailor messages to users that appear

      • by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:33PM (#52064917)

        Because people paid for those operating systems and expect full support for them for the listed amount of time. Give me a break, Windows 8.1 is essentially brand new and Windows 10 has no features worth mentioning that differentiate it from a Windows 8.1 service pack. Should they list their support as "supported until 2023 or until we change our mind"?

        • Windows 8.1 is essentially brand new

          It is? Since when is 3 years old in the computer world "brand new"?

          Even cars aren't considered "brand new" when they are 3 years old.

          Windows 10 has no features worth mentioning that differentiate it from a Windows 8.1 service pack

          From that point of view, Windows 10 is just a really fancy Windows Vista service pack, but that isn't how any of this works.

          They COULD have made it all Vista and service packs, if everyone was paying yearly sub fees, but since that isn't how Windows is sold, they need new versions to bring in money.

          • Essentially brand new because it's only 3 years old. Barely 1/3 into it's expected life span (based upon end of life support). Even a 3 year old car is considered new, though not brand new. Anyone replacing a car in 3 years is too fashion conscience most likely. Replacing an OS in only 3 years is something silly, like getting a new iphone just because there is one. Windows 7 has been in productive service (not limping along) for 6 years. XP is still in service many places and is perfectly fine for man

            • Oh, also essentially brand new since you can still buy newly manufactured PCs with Windows 8.1 pre-installed (through October).
              For example, they were still selling PCs with XP preinstalled in 2010. So you could say its only 7 years old instead of 14, depending upon when you bought it.

              • Oh, also essentially brand new since you can still buy newly manufactured PCs with Windows 8.1 pre-installed (through October).

                Most of those are older models that simply haven't been updated yet...

                And considering that they currently get a free upgrade to Windows 10, you can hardly complain...

                In any case, your entire point is meaningless, Windows 8.1 is still mainstream supported with product and feature updates. It is Windows 7 and Windows 8.0 that are out of date.

                • Windows 7 is still supported. It's just not "mainstream" support, and what that means is that it won't necessarily get major features and will only get security or other important upgrades (important to the customer that is), and that's what most customers want. I've got 8.1, It was an improvement over Windows 7 if you can get past the metro and the app store (and I like the flat look myself, I though W7 was too glossy and flashy).

                  Windows 10 could have been just an upgrade; after all they did apologize fo

            • Essentially brand new because it's only 3 years old.

              In computer terms, 3 years isn't "new" at all...

              Even a 3 year old car is considered new, though not brand new. Anyone replacing a car in 3 years is too fashion conscience most likely.

              Nope, you couldn't be more wrong...

              I replaced my 2012 SUV with the 2015 model because the 2015 model has auto-emergency braking, lane departure warning, cross traffic alert, etc...

              The 2012 version didn't have any of that and those are pure safety features.

              Replacing an OS in only 3 years is something silly, like getting a new iphone just because there is one.

              A 3 year old iPhone is quite different to the new one. That would be the first iPhone 5, and the iPhone 6s is quite different to the iPhone 5 in features and size.

              Windows 7 has been in productive service (not limping along) for 6 years.

              Windows 7 is showing its age now... it was

              • The new version is NOT better. It has changed but change is not always better and Microsoft has proven that.

                And I don't care if Microsoft needs money. Everyone needs money but I can't give some to everyone. Microsoft will have to wait in line. Now if they had a useful product then maybe I would consider bumping them ahead in line.

                • The new version is NOT better.

                  You're welcome to that opinion, but I disagree... There isn't anything from 7 that I miss in 10...

                  Two days ago I had to setup Windows 7 on a computer and it did nothing but remind me why all my computers now run Windows 10. It is superior in every way.

                  And I don't care if Microsoft needs money.

                  Of course you don't, nor should you... but it was an answer to the point of "who cares if Microsoft needs money". Clearly they care, so they'll run their business that way.

                  Expecting anything else is just foolish.

                  Now if they had a useful product then maybe I would consider bumping them ahead in line.

                  First, Windows 10 is free right now, so you

                • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

                  There is some genuinely good stuff in Windows 10, and I know many ordinary users who are quite happy with it. There problem is the spyware. If they hadn't ruined it with built-in malware, it would have been great. Or at least as great as Windows ever gets.

      • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

        As far as they are concerned, Windows XP/Vista/7/8/8.1 are competitors to Windows 10 which costs them more to maintain and with fewer monetization/expansion options, why would they do anything but encourage you to move to the new great future they believe they have created?

        The features for adding telemetry to previous versions of Windows do not add any real customer-facing value. It only benefits Redmond.
        After almost a year of "free upgrade offer" and "forced upgrades", Microsoft knows anyone not on 10 is taking proactive steps to stay there. If they get the telemetry added to the customer's previous version of Windows, well there's one less reason to stay on that version -- might as well upgrade to 10 and get the new features.

        The fewer people using the older version of Windo

    • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

      More likely they will simply release the Windows 10 SE version (secure edition), that you have to pay for, in conjunction with Windows anal probe 10, that you get for free. They would also have to allow up clean-up version for those who want to swap from anal probe to SE (secure edition). It just means the enterprise version just becomes available to typical end users. Also watch out, that means disabling the probes on the free version will also become impossible ie pay or probe extortion.

  • It will be nice to not have to worry about my Windows 7 development machines not being turned over to the Dark Side.

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by donaldm ( 919619 )

      It will be nice to not have to worry about my Windows 7 development machines not being turned over to the Dark Side.

      Yes it is, however are you aware of Windows 7 support by Microsoft actually expired on January 13, 2015 and unless you have extended support which expires January 14, 2020 you are effectively running on an unsupported operating system. That may be fine for home PC users however it may not be all that good for commercial businesses. Actually just on curiosity what are you developing for since Windows 7 is not longer mainstream supported?

      Take a look here [microsoft.com] for more information.

      If you are an avid gamer then

  • by Ralph Ostrander ( 2846785 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:15PM (#52064833)
    Because of this kind of thing it is my computer not theirs. Not their ad billboard. Not free to upload or download anything they want. Neither is my bandwidth they are using to do it. No different than breaking into my house and taking what you want because you made the door knob.
  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:27PM (#52064887)
    The nagging on my PCs should have stopped the first time I told Microsoft that I did not want the Windows 10 "upgrade".

    .
    Yet Microsoft upped the game and started to use what appeared to be malware infestation techniques to try to trick me into getting Windows 10.

    Microsoft's reputation and credibility has been all but permanently damaged, imo.

    • by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:41PM (#52064955)

      "Hello, I am a Nigerian prince and I need your help to sneak my OS onto your country's PCs."

    • And what turds will they leave on my system?
    • Microsoft's reputation and credibility has been all but permanently damaged, imo.

      I agree, except for the "all but".

      We've been actively reducing our dependence on anything from Microsoft ever since Nadella took over, and I doubt our policy will change until the senior management team has changed again and the corporate strategy has changed with it.

      Personally, I expect that to happen before Windows 7 support runs out. I don't think they can afford not to have a credible successor available by then, and clearly for many people and businesses that successor is not Windows 10.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      The last time the update that installs Windows 10 came back I wrote to Microsoft. I told them that further attempts to force enable this update would be charged at my standard rate. Next time I'll send them an invoice, and if they don't pay it's on to Small Claims Court.

      This technique works well for all sorts of irritations in the UK. TV Licencing harassment, spam, cold callers etc. Works best against large companies who are desperate to avoid having the bailiffs sent in to their offices.

  • by RyanFenton ( 230700 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:30PM (#52064909)

    Microsoft seems to have had their heart set of giving away the razor kits, but selling the blades with Windows 10.

    Unfortunately, their Windows Store appears to mostly be filled with copy-cat apps and intentional scams - and when you DO buy "apps" from the store, you don't get a proper executable to use as you'd like such as you'd get from GOG or Steam.

    What Microsoft is promoting is a 'Universal Windows Platform" or UWP. UWP applications aren't proper windows programs that you can freely use as you're used to. Instead, they're packaged in encrypted folders, and are essentially laden down with heavy DRM, like a new-age DIVX format. That means, no modding except for very limited things developers exactly plan for, no true fullscreen for games (borderless windowed is forced for now), very few graphics options, and essentially everything locked to how an "XBox One" would present things, since that is the basic intention, to allow game developers to simultaneously publish without separate testing or development cycles on all MS-owned platforms.

    Expect to get a LOT more pressure in that direction, before they give up on this approach, almost exactly the same as happened with the horrible GFWL initiative years back.

    Somehow though, there's still going to be SOME game developers that drink the cool-aide on this, and will publish UWP games. I'd say stick with Steam/GOG/etc on the platform of your choice, and politely and constructively complain on their forums if they don't bother to publish an actual PC port of the game.

    Ryan Fenton

    • Unfortunately, their Windows Store appears to mostly be filled with copy-cat apps and intentional scams - and when you DO buy "apps" from the store, you don't get a proper executable to use as you'd like such as you'd get from GOG or Steam.

      You do know that many Steam titles are protected with DRM that only works when Steam works, right? You cannot for example a "Steam backup" of such a title without having Steam connected to the network, because the restored backup is not playable until it has been blessed.

      I'm sure that most of the games I've got now are DRM-less, because most of them are indie titles, but there's some variation on that point.

      • You do know that many Steam titles are protected with DRM that only works when Steam works, right? You cannot for example a "Steam backup" of such a title without having Steam connected to the network, because the restored backup is not playable until it has been blessed.

        I'm sure that most of the games I've got now are DRM-less, because most of them are indie titles, but there's some variation on that point.

        Oh, certainly it IS DRM - but outside of some horrible companies sandwiching DRM inside their own bin

        • I always check if a game is on GOG first before buying it on Steam. I'll take DRM-free over DRM any day of the week. Even if GOG doesn't have quite as many promotional discounts going.

    • This is his they lead you to their walled garden. Eventually UWP will get all the new API versions and updates, such as DirectX, and Win32 will be left to stagnate and eventually will be shed and relegated to legacy VM only.

      • The first part, letting Win32 stagnate, is something people have been hoping for for years. The end of OS updates breaking old applications. It's that last part that's the killer.

  • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Friday May 06, 2016 @08:56PM (#52065029)

    On July 31, there will be an out-of-band update that will prompt the user, "Would you like to ruin your life and everything in it?" If you select "Yes" then it will install Windows 10. If you select "No" it will install Windows 10 and say, "you're welcome". ;)

  • >> it will end the annoying "Get Windows 10" notifications in July

    and replace it with annoying "Buy Windows 10" notifications.

    • Yes exactly. But that was the deal - 1 year to freely upgrade. Afterwards, pay us.

      Maybe download the updater ISO that includes a valid Win10 install key for your device, without installing it. Possibly it'd still be valid to install after the July window, even if you apply it in a year or two.

      (I remember having to apply the November 10586 build over the top of the July 10240 build because the update process was broken, so I wonder what'll happen about the "anniversary update". If it's broken or they start

      • by jonwil ( 467024 )

        If there was a way I could get a free valid copy of Windows 10 now (as an upgrade from my current Windows 7 copy) without actually installing it yet, I would go for it just so I have the option to install it later without paying for it. But I have yet to see a way to do that anywhere.

  • and you don't have MS Office, Windows 10 will start popping up adds in the desktop UI encouraging you to buy office.

    Do they think that people are somehow unaware that Office exists and is available for purchase? Or that you'll fork over the money to buy office to make the stupid pop-ups go away? Or do they just want people to think they're sleazy, obnoxious assholes?

  • You have to be a brain-dead moron with Alzheimer's to believe anything Microsoft states.

  • That's what the anonymous Microsoft employee posted yesterday on slashdot.
  • by dynamo ( 6127 )

    So after forcing the software on windows users everywhere, at random times, now they think they can start charging for it and have people bend over? Damn I'm glad I started refusing to use windows back around 3.1.

  • That disables it. A simple google search will help.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Linux will never catch on if you need to edit weird files for the computer to just work.

  • ``In April, the Windows 10 upgrade screen interrupted a meteorologist's live forecast.''

    I hope the person in charge of the seven-second delay/bleep was on the ball. If I'd been that meteorologist, I'm certain there'd have been something to bleep.

  • by allo ( 1728082 ) on Saturday May 07, 2016 @08:05AM (#52066465)

    ... how microsoft installs and uninstalls software on our pcs via updates. You install an update and expect some bugfixes and improvments and end up with a new program installed. You install the next update and the program will be uninstalled. That's not how updates are supposed to work.
    And it's scary, what ms might install in the future via an update.

  • Today I noticed that KB3035583 popped back up in my list of optional updates for Win 7. Doesn't matter that I've told it to stop showing me that one 4 TIMES already, Micor$oft keeps pushing it down my throat. That's why I keep looking up the KB numbers at independent sites before I install them. Micro$oft stop pushing and nagging about the upgrade around July 29th? Yeah, but in what YEAR? I bet they stop pushing it once they start pushing for us to upgrade to Win 11. I think my next computer OS is goi
  • Doesn't that pretty much coincide with the time they start charging for Windows 10? I was in the beta forever and even though I have a pre-release version of Windows can I still get the upgrade pop ups. I tried to use my Windows key from my laptop running Windows 7 but it's rejecting it. It's a used machine that used to belong to the Department of Defense so I'm sure it's probably some weird issue with the license key being shown as owned by them and it's causing problems because now it's a home IP address

"And remember: Evil will always prevail, because Good is dumb." -- Spaceballs

Working...