Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Microsoft Cloud Open Source Operating Systems

Microsoft Has Created Its Own FreeBSD (microsoft.com) 247

Simon Sharwood, writing for The Register: Microsoft has published its own distribution of FreeBSD 10.3 in order to make the OS available and supported in Azure. Jason Anderson, principal PM manager at Microsoft's Open Source Technology Center says Redmond "took on the work of building, testing, releasing and maintaining the image" so it could "ensure our customers have an enterprise SLA for their FreeBSD VMs running in Azure". Microsoft did so "to remove that burden" from the FreeBSD Foundation, which relies on community contributions. Redmond is not keeping its work on FreeBSD to itself: Anderson says "the majority of the investments we make at the kernel level to enable network and storage performance were up-streamed into the FreeBSD 10.3 release, so anyone who downloads a FreeBSD 10.3 image from the FreeBSD Foundation will get those investments from Microsoft built in to the OS."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Microsoft Has Created Its Own FreeBSD

Comments Filter:
  • GBSD (Score:5, Funny)

    by phrostie ( 121428 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @01:49PM (#52282939)

    does this mean they will replace GWX with a Get FreeBSD button?
    I might give that a try.

    I have run a bsd in a while.

  • by fahrbot-bot ( 874524 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @01:49PM (#52282949)

    ...so anyone who downloads a FreeBSD 10.3 image from the FreeBSD Foundation will get those investments from Microsoft built in to the OS.

    Clippy: I see you're running FreeBSD. Would you like to upgrade to Windows 10 now or reschedule for later?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 09, 2016 @02:06PM (#52283061)

      Although you joke, those who use Linux, especially those who use it seriously and for the long term, should be getting worried right about now.

      We're seeing turmoil within the wider Linux community, mainly thanks to systemd. Regardless of your take on systemd, it has been very divisive.

      Systemd has been a total disaster for many users, resulting in Linux installations that don't boot properly.

      Even those who don't dislike it completely do realize that it represents a dangerous consolidation within the Linux ecosystem.

      It goes beyond systemd, including problematic software like GNOME 3, PulseAudio, and even newer versions of Firefox.

      A monoculture is developing, where all of the major Linux distros are becoming very much alike.

      Linux users who don't want to be part of this monoculture are told to use obscure niche distros, which is a polite way of telling them to "fuck off and die".

      So many have looked elsewhere. The *BSDs are an obvious choice for many refugees from Linux, and OS X for others.

      We're seeing a resurgence of interest in FreeBSD and OpenBSD, and it won't be good for Linux.

      There is now a whole generation of young developers and sysadmins who missed out on the FreeBSD glory years of the 1990s, but who are now rediscovering what we knew then: that the BSDs provide the best open source UNIX-like experience available.

      So while we're seeing the Linux ecosystem disintegrate, we're seeing the FreeBSD and OpenBSD ecosystems becoming even stronger.

      Linux users should be very concerned about the long term viability of Linux. Those who have enough foresight to see what's happening to the Linux ecosystem are already moving to FreeBSD or OpenBSD, and they will be glad that they got out before things got really bad.

      • by SumDog ( 466607 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @02:25PM (#52283183) Homepage Journal

        Don't know why you're getting the downvotes.

        I agree with you on systemd. Linux did need full process management. I do like how systemd standardized the init system and it'd be nice if there could be a simple drop-in replacement for it. Uselessd development has stopped and no one has the time to contribute anymore. The big projects are all funded by the big for-profit companies.

        I use Gentoo and still love it. I don't use systemd, but it is an optional choice (like it should be). I haven't touched FreeBSD in years, but I can understand people moving that route. I might load it up at some point. I just don't have the time to invest these days and Gentoo still works great for me at work and at home.

        • I suspect I am going to be shouted down for this, but there is also Solaris, which IMO is a very good system as well. Some of the best ideas in unix came from SunOS. I've never really had the chance to work with the BSDs, so I don't know how they compare.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Don't spell it "systemd".

        Spell it "SystemD"

        That way it looks like an ASCII penis.

      • Although you joke, those who use Linux, especially those who use it seriously and for the long term, should be getting worried right about now.

        It goes beyond systemd, including problematic software like GNOME 3, PulseAudio, and even newer versions of Firefox.

        Worried? You bet, Linux Mint is getting sloppy, and I plan (had) on running Mint KDE long term and seriously.

        Install Opera 12.16 (12.16.1860-1linuxmint) (this is the best Windows version, and browser).
        Left click far left Opera tab > Settings > Preferences > Advanced
        There are 5 boxes for selected options (4 selected) with no indication of what they are for or do, and it continues through out the settings.

        I won't use it.

        This is a verified realible release from Synaptic Package Manager no PPA's; main

      • I noticed all the things you did notice, plus one, the freebsd offered as an alternative to the systemd linux.

        Leaving a GPLd distro for one that lets corporations fork freely is leaving the trenches to hide beyond cardboard boxes.

        Captcha, distill.

      • Although you joke, those who use Linux, especially those who use it seriously and for the long term, should be getting worried right about now.

        We're seeing turmoil within the wider Linux community, mainly thanks to systemd. Regardless of your take on systemd, it has been very divisive.

        It's been very divisive only because of people spreading FUD like yourself.

        It goes beyond systemd, including problematic software like GNOME 3, PulseAudio, and even newer versions of Firefox. ... Linux users who don't want to be part of this monoculture are told to use obscure niche distros, which is a polite way of telling them to "fuck off and die".

        Pick one:
        1. I want a niche distro to accommodate my specific need (i.e. to boycott software maintained by people who work for Red Hat and Mozilla).
        2. I want a mainstream distro that uses technologies that the majority is OK with.
        3. I will roll/maintain/fund my own distro that is a preferential combination of 1 & 2.

        So while we're seeing the Linux ecosystem disintegrate, we're seeing the FreeBSD and OpenBSD ecosystems becoming even stronger.

        I am just curious if you have a single stat to back that up with. Because the financials of Red Hat, SUSE, Oracl

  • Smart (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ErichTheRed ( 39327 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @01:56PM (#52282987)

    The interesting thing is that you would never see this happen under previous leadership. Forget the Windows 10 mess, even forget Microsoft selling one-off software at all. They are absolutely committed to using Azure to become the next IBM. The reason why IBM is still alive is because they draw massive monthly revenue from the mainframe business. You don't just buy a mainframe and a z/OS license as a one-time thing. You buy the hardware, the licenses, plus a huge monthly maintenance charge, _plus_ a pay-by-the-MIPS charge to use the hardware. IBM maintains the system for you, sends minions to replace parts, gives you access to upgrades, etc. for this fee. In an environment like this, it makes perfect sense to allow customers to run whatever they want as long as they run it on Azure. Microsoft will be the toll collector for anything their customers choose to migrate there. I'm working on a big Azure migration/rebuild project, and it's so obvious that Microsoft is done pushing their own software...as long as you rent their infrastructure.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      IBM maintains the system for you

      That is the way of IBM. There was a small period where they did not have this going on very well. But they are back into it heavy duty. There was a time when you rented particular instructions from them. This goes all the way back to the 1930s. It is the Ma-Bell way of computing. You rent everything and own nothing. It is why the micro computer revolution destroyed IBM.

      Now that everything is 'the cloud' the old ways are coming back into fashion.

      • It is why the micro computer revolution destroyed IBM.

        Ironic, considering IBM's role in creating a massively popular microcomputing platform.

        • by jedidiah ( 1196 )

          It really wasn't terribly popular until someone cloned it and took it out of the hands of IBM.

        • It is why the micro computer revolution destroyed IBM.

          Ironic, considering IBM's role in creating a massively popular microcomputing platform.

          But they didn't. Microcomputing was doing just fine before IBM entered the market. What IBM did was put the stamp of "business respectability" on microcomputing. Because back then a Data Processing PHB could have a complete lobotomy and still prosper because IBM would tell him what to do.

      • I don't think you are using that word correctly. IBM dumped the PC division because the market is saturated and the margin is thin.

      • Re:Smart (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @06:26PM (#52285011)

        The history of computing has been a fight between centralized control versus user control.
        Mainframes with a priesthood (mortals are not allowed to touch the big blue iron box).
        Mortal users start buying minicomputers for their own department use. A local priesthood is set up to manage access to them.
        Company says that multiple department priesthoods is clumsy, so central priesthood is put in charge of all departmental minis.
        Mortal users start buying microcomputers for their own office or lab use. Interns are hired to maintain and dust them.
        Central priesthood sets up a standardized software licensing group, to verify that no one is using unapproved software.
        PCs become more ubiquitous, even in the offices of computer illiterates.
        Central priesthood demands that no one can connect to the internet unless the priesthood managers their computers.
        Users start getting email on their mobile phones
        Priesthood demands that monitoring services be put onto all of the phones.
        The big blue iron box is no longer present but the priesthood remains.

    • So, Microsoft is headed full circle, with the cloud as the new mainframe? In the day, they nearly wiped out the IBM model (and IBM with it); now they're aiming to be the next IBM.
      Amazing.
      IBM wasn't too good at the consumer end, because they figured out which side of the bread got buttered. Will Microsoft do better? or is the X-Box doomed and desktop Windows 10 going to more and more resemble a thin-client X terminal [wikipedia.org] (and Scott McNealy goes, "dammit, that was my idea!")

  • by cant_get_a_good_nick ( 172131 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @01:58PM (#52282997)

    Originally, the first TCP/IP stack and some command line TCP/IP tools (ftp.exe) were from BSD. Eventually Microsoft wrote it's own stack and tools.

  • It's beautiful.

  • Correct me if I'm wrong but with FreeBSD addition, Azure is the only major cloud provider besides AWS that offers all three major operating systems available today: Windows, Linux and FreeBSD. Will definitely consider Azure for my cross-platform endeavors in the future.
    • by swb ( 14022 )

      There's at least one pfsense appliance in the AWS image inventory from a third party vendor.

  • by sootman ( 158191 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @02:54PM (#52283395) Homepage Journal

    "Due to a Windows Update server misconfiguration, users who clicked "yes" to upgrade to Windows 10 after 10 June 2016 found themselves running BSD."

  • I used/supported MS products for nearly 20 years, but when I retired I decided I was done with MS' and other proprietary software. After seeing the bullshit MS is pulling with Windows 10, I would trust MS about as far as I could throw them. At least with their FreeBSD, I assume you can audit the source code, to be sure they haven't sprinkled little "telemetry" surprises in it.. *IF* I was going to run FreeBSD on a cloud-based virtual host, I'd stay the hell away from Azure, and it would be an actual FreeBSD

  • Hyperbole (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Ster ( 556540 ) on Thursday June 09, 2016 @03:19PM (#52283625)

    Hi folks,

    Disclaimer: I'm a FreeBSD committer.

    MS has been committing various Hyper-V drivers for months. Just like VMWare does for its hypervisor.

    This is less

    OMG a new fork! Embrace, Extend, Extinguish!!!

    and more

    Here's a pre-built VM image with 10.3 + a few Hyper-V drivers that weren't backported in time for the 10.3 freeze + a few scripts to automate configuration in the Azure environment

    You know, like every other cloud vendor's VM images. Nothing to see here, move along.

    So, stop Hyper-Ventilating! ;-)

    • Thanks, I was about to say the same thing.

      MS just did what every other cloud vendor can and should do.

    • Re:Hyperbole (Score:4, Insightful)

      by nine-times ( 778537 ) <nine.times@gmail.com> on Thursday June 09, 2016 @04:52PM (#52284339) Homepage
      I agree with you up until the "nothing to see here" part. You're right in pointing out that this is a relatively normal thing to do given that Microsoft develops one of the most widely used hypervisors, but it's still noteworthy because Microsoft has spent decades refusing to do these kinds of "normal things".
  • If you don't know what Microsoft Xenix is get off my lawn.

    • Netcraft confirms, FreeBSD is dyng... oh, wait...

      Netcraft confirms, Microsoft is dying... um...

      Ah! Netcraft confirms, Xenix is dying!

  • pigs with wings? devils in uggs?

  • In fact, screw the FreeBSD.

  • I've joked about "MS Linux" for years, and now it looks like my worst fears have come true.

  • Blue Screen of Death?

Bringing computers into the home won't change either one, but may revitalize the corner saloon.

Working...