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Air, Land, Sea, Cyber: NATO Adds Cyberspace To Operation Areas (phys.org) 33

An anonymous reader writes from a report via Phys.Org: On Tuesday, NATO decided to make cyber operations part of its war domain, along with air, sea, and land operations. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the decision is not aimed at any one particular country, just that allies need to be able to better defend themselves and respond to computer network attacks. Phys.Org reports: "The decision has been long in coming, particularly amid rising tensions with Russia, which has proven its willingness to launch computer-based attacks against other nations. About a year ago, U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter told NATO that it must improve its ability to protect itself before it builds its cyberwar capabilities. And he pledged that the U.S. would used its expertise to help allies assess their vulnerabilities and reduce the risk to their critical infrastructure. In 2014, after years of debate, NATO finally agreed that a cyberattack could rise to the level of a military assault and could trigger the Article 5 protections, which allow the alliance to go to the collective defense of another member that has been attacked. New research from the Pew Research Center shows that cyberattacks are the second most-feared entity among Americans after ISIS.
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Air, Land, Sea, Cyber: NATO Adds Cyberspace To Operation Areas

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  • Spies have been around since before "air" and did much the same thing: information warfare. If IW wasn't a domain before computers there's no reason for it to be a domain now. the only new situation is programs that make decisions without human intervention and for the moment that's a very few drone, missile, and Close In Weapons Systems.When robot armies march o'er the land and are making tactical decisions this will make sense, but not before. This meaningless posturing is going to cost billions.
    • Yes, spies have been around forever. What's new is today most organizations can't function without their computer networks. In WWII, the combatants bombed each other's railroad networks, because with the railroad shut down the enemy couldn't move men and materials, production would largely shut down in the affected areas, etc. Today we're even more reliant on computer networks than we ever were on railroad networks.

      If an enemy were to do substantial damage to our computer and network infrastructure, that wo

      • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
        Most smart nations govs and mils can function just fine without consumer grade computer networks tracked by NATO.
        Many have finally understood the NSA and GCHQ interest in all their local networks and communications systems going back to the 1960's.
        Why not give the West something creative to find, worry about and read on local servers and watch for the reaction and leaks to the press about exotic projects countered by contractors and the mil?
        The ability to keep data on a base or area for select trusted st
  • Defence against 'computer network attacks', that would be like trying to stop their Microsoft Windows computers being hacked. No one in their right minds would put Microsoft Windows anywhere near a war domain. Have they that short a memory:

    Software glitches leave Navy Smart Ship dead in the water [gcn.com]

    Technical Analysis of the August 14, 2003, Blackout: [nerc.com]

    Slammer worm crashed Ohio nuke plant network [securityfocus.com]
    • So I actually read all that and it turns out unless you have insider information you're not giving the initial fail was due to a bug. But even if it were due to a virus (that you know about but the report doesn't mention) the cascading failures were due to first: inadequately robust software design turning a processor stall into a buffer overflow. (this wouldn't have been the virus) Second: inadequately robust system design turning the overflow into a missed alarm. Third: inadequately robust system design n
  • >> New research from the Pew Research Center shows that cyberattacks are the second most-feared entity among Americans after ISIS.

    #3 on the most feared list, slighly above manbearpig, is dihydrogen oxide. We MUST ban this dangerous compound now. Think of the children!
    http://www.dhmo.org/
  • Hi, I'm a modern day Cassandra... I've been shouting for years about a solution that can actually fix computer security, and render all this "cyberwar" crap obsolete...

    Even the Wikipedia page is a mess, but you'll find the solution buried in it... it's called the Principle of least Privilege [wikipedia.org], and I figure it's 10 more years of hell before people catch on and actually start to fix things.

    It is entirely possible to give users a modern GUI interface which transparently and intuitively allows them to decide whi

    • > allows them to decide which resources a program should be allowed to access ...
      > an OS that doesn't trust everything. (Good luck finding one!)

      We've had that for 15 years. That's called SELinux (Security-enhanced Linux). Other alternatives are gresecurity and AppArmor.

      > a modern GUI interface which transparently and intuitively

      That's what is missing.
      Right now, the easiest tools to use include a default set of rules, then show violations and let you add rules to allow it next time.

  • I am the very model of a modern Cyber General
    I've information secretive and knowledge technological
    I know my way around the tubes and quote the cryptological
    From Adi, Bruce and Len to Ron in order alphabetical!


    While I wish I could have claimed it as my original that belongs to Arancaytar with this post [slashdot.org].
  • U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter told NATO that it must improve its ability to protect itself before it builds its cyberwar capabilities

    talk about the pot calling the kettle black!

You mean you didn't *know* she was off making lots of little phone companies?

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