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O'Reilly Discounts Every eBook By 50% (oreilly.com) 47

On Friday, O'Reilly Media announced "Our Cyber Monday sale starts now." An anonymous reader writes: They're offering a 50% discount on every ebook they publish -- over 14,000 titles from O'Reilly, No Starch Press, Pearson, A Book Apart, Make, Packt, and 25 other book publishers. (And they're offering a 60 percent discount on orders over $100.) Just use the code CYBER16 when checking out to claim the discount. The sale continues through Tuesday morning at 5 a.m. PST.

These are all DRM-free ebooks (in multiple formats), and there's even some "early release" editions -- advance copies distributed before their official publication. The discount also applies to new titles like "Head First Python" as well as old-school classics like "Learning Perl". Right now their best-sellers are "Wicked Cool Shell Scripts", "Modern Linux Administration", and "You Don't Know JS: Up and Going" -- but again, the discount applies to any ebook that they sell, and they also still have their selection of free programming texts.

Tim O'Reilly was one of the first people interviewed by Slashdot -- more than 17 years ago.
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O'Reilly Discounts Every eBook By 50%

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  • by TechFurryFox ( 4327457 ) on Saturday November 26, 2016 @12:38PM (#53365535)
    Ebook piracy is rampant, does anyone buy ebooks anymore?
    • I don't know where to find all of them and if they are fairly priced I may buy them.

      Anyway what I really wanted to point out is the current book bundle over at https://www.humblebundle.com/b... [humblebundle.com]
      It beats 50% off.

      UNIX presented by O'reilly:

      For free:
      * Ten Steps to Linux Survival Excerpt

      $1:
      * Unix in a Nutshell, 4th edition.
      * sed & awk, 2nd edition.
      * lex and yacc, 2nd edition.
      * Learning the Bash shell, 3rd edition.
      * Linux pocket guide, 3rd edition.

      Pay $8 and you'll also get:
      * Bash cookbook.
      * Classic shell Scr

      • Just picked up the $15 pack. Don't know when I'll be using yacc again, but that's such a steal, what do I care. Besides the guy that's taking over my job in IT really is kind of deficient on the Unix front, not to mention not being too great at DNS, so those will be of some use.

        • Why are you even thinking about the person replacing you? Anyone replacing me will find comment free code with no history in version control. If they're lucky.

          • I'm his manager now

          • Great idea, you can never be promoted and will get a bad reference. Genius.

            • No such thing as a bad reference, at least in the UK. You'd just sue them for lying, resulting in an expensive court case which would highlight publicly other failings in the company.

              • by ranton ( 36917 )

                No such thing as a bad reference, at least in the UK. You'd just sue them for lying, resulting in an expensive court case which would highlight publicly other failings in the company.

                The lack of a glowing reference is the equivalent of a bad reference. If someone gives the standard title / date of hire / etc answers, a reference checker just has to ask if giving that answer is a company policy across the board. Since the answer to that is usually no, they will know the lack of information is equivalent to a very bad reference. And completely legal even in the UK.

                • by Threni ( 635302 )

                  I'm just saying that in the UK you practically never get any sort of reference except one which states your state and end date, position, and sometimes the number of sick days. That's it; it's totally normal and because of this no-one reads anything into it; you'd look naive even asking the company if this were normal.

      • by johanw ( 1001493 )

        > I don't know where to find all of them

        Try forum.mobilism.org (register to use the search function). Popular SF is there faster than Amazon can ship it. I downloaded Navigators of Dune the day it came available.
        Try Google the title + epub or pdf
        Try the pirate bay

        I wish I had those resourcs when I was a graduate student, carrying all those heavy books would be replaced by just loading them on a tablet.

        • by aliquis ( 678370 )

          Google + pdf most often end up to links to YouTube videos or Google docs or something which looks like a blurred PDF reader which suggest you register for a free (for some time?) account by giving them your credit card data or some usenet page. None of it really gives you the book.

          Sometimes you actually can find the book though.

          Pirate bay doesn't have all the books and comics which are on HB they may have some. The prices are very fair on HB anyway.

          Mobilism I have no idea about. Maybe I should check it out.

        • I use this bookmarklet as a way of quickly searching for ebooks online when i see something I like. Bookmark this in Chrome and thank me later.

          javascript:(function(){window.open("https://www.google.com/?q=filetype:pdf+OR+filetype:epub+OR+filetype:mobi+"+encodeURIComponent(prompt('Enter the book title/author/ISBN','Start typing now')))})();

      • Fantastic deal. Mind you, you don't get free updates as you would from directly purchasing from O'Reilly. I think you can upgrade for $4.99 per title, so pick the ones you want (or are likely to need upgrades) and do that. Still save a lot.

        Would have been nice to have Apache (or nginx) and Samba books though.

    • by RandomSurfer314 ( 4412795 ) on Saturday November 26, 2016 @01:54PM (#53365927)
      I suppose honest people do.
    • I support companies that treat their customers good and offer good services and are ethical/progressive, the ones that have showed the be unethical I rape by finding their IP on the internet and using it for free,

    • I actually do buy ebooks every now and then. Perhaps it's silly, but there are plenty of books out there that do seem worth shelling some money over in the hopes of encouraging more work on them, like e.g. Mastering STM32 on Leanpub ( https://leanpub.com/mastering-... [leanpub.com] ). I don't feel like I threw my money down the drain when I bought it.

    • I do, but the timing of Black Friday / Cyber Monday tends to suck every year -> I get (like many people on salary) paid monthly, and at the end of the month (last day). Some places it's the first of the month, other places it's the second week of the month, etc. Anyway, these *deals* will expire two days before I'd have the cash to really take advantage of them, leaving me to either wait until after Christmas / New Years, or try to get something during a panic sale right before Christmas Eve.

  • by BenBoy ( 615230 ) on Saturday November 26, 2016 @12:44PM (#53365565)
    APress [apress.com] does discounts annually for cyber-Monday as well ... 10 bucks per e-book, 12.50 for paper. Makes a fellow all gluttonous ...
  • For those of you who like books, I recommend these books on JavaScript:

    1) "The Principles of Object-Oriented JavaScript", by Nicholas C. Zakas. That book is great. And if anyone can tell me what the picture [oreilly.com] is on the front of the book, I'd appreciate it! (Is it a factory?)

    2) The series [oreilly.com] of books "You Don't Know JS", by Kyle Simpson.

  • I often pirate their books and read the first few chapters. If I like the book I buy the dead tree version. I find I learn from a physical book much better than from reading off a monitor. I would say 75% of my reference books are now O'Reily.

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