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Windows 10 Upgrade Bug Disabled Cntrl-C In Bash (infoworld.com) 277

An anonymous reader quotes InfoWorld: A massive set of changes to the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) was rolled into Windows Insider build 15002... If this is any hint, Microsoft's goal is nothing short of making it a credible alternative to other Linux distributions... Some of the fixes also implement functionality that wasn't available before to Linux apps in WSL, such as support for kernel memory overcommit and previously omitted network stack options. Other changes enhance integration between WSL and the rest of Windows...

[O]ne major issue in build 15002 is that Ctrl-C in a Bash session no longer works. Microsoft provided an uncommon level of detail for how this bug crept in, saying it had to do with synchronization between the Windows and Bash development teams. The next Insider build should have a fix. But for people doing serious work with Linux command-line apps, not having Ctrl-C is a little like driving a car when only the front brakes work.

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Windows 10 Upgrade Bug Disabled Cntrl-C In Bash

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  • Ha-Ha! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 15, 2017 @10:56PM (#53674447)

    But for people doing serious work with Linux command-line apps

    ...we use a Linux operating system.

    • Re:Ha-Ha! (Score:5, Funny)

      by creimer ( 824291 ) on Sunday January 15, 2017 @11:15PM (#53674515) Homepage
      Or Cygwin.
    • Re:Ha-Ha! (Score:5, Interesting)

      by SirSlud ( 67381 ) on Sunday January 15, 2017 @11:44PM (#53674637) Homepage

      You know, some of us use windows since it's quite client facing. This might blow your mind. Anything either side can do to bridge the gap of best of both worlds is a good thing.

      • Re:Ha-Ha! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Princeofcups ( 150855 ) <john@princeofcups.com> on Sunday January 15, 2017 @11:50PM (#53674661) Homepage

        You know, some of us use windows since it's quite client facing. This might blow your mind. Anything either side can do to bridge the gap of best of both worlds is a good thing.

        You somehow missed 30 years of embrace, extend, and extinguish.

        • You may have missed that MS is no longer run by an evil genius but rather someone who tries to build just enough value to run companies into the ground.

          I don't believe the current management collectively have the braincells to implement EEE. Hell Balmer failed that too and he was significantly more strategic than the current degenerates.

      • If Microsoft wanted to do something actually useful in that regard the, instead of WSL, we'd see them contributing major patches to WINE.

    • In 20 years, I've had exactly one occasion to run Linux stuff on Windows. I've had one other program I ran on Windows, that I can recall.

      We have a framework on Linux, written mostly in Perl, which runs hundreds of small tools. We wanted to add a specific Windows-only tool to our system. So the g framework is installed under Cygwin on a few machines to run that one Windows tool.

      • We have a framework on Linux, written mostly in Perl, which runs hundreds of small tools. We wanted to add a specific Windows-only tool to our system. So the g framework is installed under Cygwin on a few machines to run that one Windows tool.

        Why did you choose Cygwin instead of e.g. ActivePerl?

  • by pz ( 113803 ) on Sunday January 15, 2017 @10:56PM (#53674451) Journal

    Who spells it with an N?

  • by orin ( 113079 ) on Sunday January 15, 2017 @11:19PM (#53674523)
    Computers running OSX have substantial developer mindshare. Microsoft wants those developers using Windows PCs. Putting WSL/Bash on Windows so that it's a credible alternative to the 'nix tools available on OSX gives those developers one less reason to avoid using a Windows based OS.
    • by Shados ( 741919 )

      Bingo. We have a winner.

      Microsoft is pushing hard for Windows lap-tops to no longer be shitty (eg: trackpad), and they're pushing Linux on Windows (until these updates are released its not really useful: it's missing important stuff such as file watching, etc).

      Once this is all in, it's going to be in pretty good shape. Just missing a few things like an Alfred alternative that doesn't suck, but that's not as important.

      • Pretty good shape for what? I can download Ubuntu and throw it on a box for, well, the cost of the machine (and I've got several lying around). If I want to move data around I've got everything from Samba to ssh copying, and even NFS. What is it exactly that running Ubuntu under Windows grants me? As it stands, at the moment, I'd be pretty buggered with this update. Microsoft's QA on their own products has gone down the crapper, why would I want the same level of incompetence responsible for my BASH session

    • by Ambassador Kosh ( 18352 ) on Monday January 16, 2017 @03:25AM (#53675187)

      Microsoft has been working quite hard to make windows a good development platform for linux. Between WSL and the changes to Visual Studio it has gotten pretty easy to do writing, compiling and debugging of linux software from windows.

      For me this is really important since linux has never run well on this laptop. I have optimus which means I have a dedicated gpu + integrated gpu and with windows it seamlessly switches between them and everything works. Under linux there are commands to make one or the other run but it is not remotely seamless and it is really buggy. I have also run into problems with ubuntu and fedora where an update will sometimes break x entirely where the default output gets set to the device that is not activated and then having to deal with debugging that.

      I also write C++ simulation software and I have found no better IDE that VisualStudio so far. With eclipse under linux once I upgraded to an SSD I sometimes had issues to compile multiple times to compile without errors about files not being found. If I compiled from the command line that never happened. Debugging is MUCH worse in eclipse vs visual studio. The worse thing though is profiling. I have no idea what happened to it on linux since I have done linux development for almost 20 years now and we used to have some of the best profilers out there but no it seems most of them just do a horrible job. Trying to profile a program that uses shared libraries in linux mostly ends up with no, poor or inconsistent results even when the program behavior is highly consistent. I ended up trying the proprietary vtune from intel and that worked great on linux and windows.

      In the end it is easier to do development on windows where all the desktop type stuff works and get the software running completely correctly and debugged and then deploy it to linux servers, clusters, supercomputers etc for actual running. At this point I pretty much use windows for desktop work and linux for all the server work and the WSL system has made life much simpler.

    • Microsoft wants those developers using Windows PCs. Putting WSL/Bash on Windows so that it's a credible alternative to the 'nix tools available on OSX gives those developers one less reason to avoid using a Windows based OS.

      Except it isn't a credible alternative, because microsoft does stuff like breaking break. Why would you use that garbage over cygwin if what you're trying to get is development tools?

      • Breaking break is a known bug in a beta release. It's not in any production release.

        Lots of things don't run on Cygwin that do run on Ubuntu/WSL. And Ubuntu/WSL is more like Ubuntu than Cygwin is.

    • by TWX ( 665546 )
      Hell, I've driven a car whose brake master cylinder was leaking and I had to go 30 miles with only one or two good pumps of the pedal left.

      I also had a broken Windows 95 beta that required me to manually kill msgsrv32.exe as I logged-in otherwise the whole box would be inoperable in a few seconds.

      Neither experience was especially pleasurable or calming.
    • Really not a big deal. With weight transfer, the harder you brake, the larger share of the stopping is done by the front wheels anyway.

      I disabled the rear brake on my race bike. As did many other racers. Sure, the needs of street vehicles is different, but in most circumstances, front brakes only is adequate.
    • Actually, if you were forced to pick... you're better off if your front brakes are functional. Remember, rolling friction is greater than sliding friction.

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      Never done that, but driven plenty without front brakes at all.
      Can you hear the drums Fernando?
  • by Quarters ( 18322 ) on Sunday January 15, 2017 @11:25PM (#53674555)

    It isn't an "upgrade bug" as the upgrade isn't slated for release for months.The build in question has only been released to the fast ring for Insider testing. In other words, it's only been given to those on the extreme bleeding edgeof Windows testing.Is Slashdot going to start posting articles for every minor issue in Chrome canary releases also?

    • by TWX ( 665546 )
      Well, it is kind of funny to hear that they managed to break Break. Like, a fundamental aspect of computing that predates Microsoft itself and they screwed it up...
      • by dbIII ( 701233 )
        Well they are the people who managed to even fuck up "ping" (look up "ping of death" for how badly they did it) despite having the BSD source code given to them on a plate.
  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Sunday January 15, 2017 @11:25PM (#53674559)
    Really ... who on this planet is looking forward to running some manner of Linux emulation that is subject to the whims and bugs of Microsoft's current design and development process? Any of Microsoft's Windows Updates could cripple the very environment you would depend upon.

    .
    Yeah, that sounds like a success story.

    • by TWX ( 665546 )
      Hey, I knew people that, for reasons I never understood, got behind the .net reimplementation mono and really pushed to get everything working and to push for original development for it. Which of course made it easy to switch to a Windows platform when the new boss didn't understand Linux and demanded the change.
  • So MS wants no more Linux clients for administration, so Linux becomes solely a server/CLI environment, and to allow Linux tools to easily leverage Windows components and possibly come to depend on them?

    Sure shortsightedly it is more options to help people get work done, but I'm talking about long term here.

    • In the long term Microsoft is fearful that the whole computing world is shifting beneath their feet, and they need to try to stay relevant. I'm sure there some of the old the old Triple-E evilness here, but in reality they're watching the PC fading as a platform (no, it won't die quickly, but it is doomed), so trying to get more developers to use their platform, even if it means they're running a fucking BASH shell and developing with vi is better than them not using a Microsoft product at all.

      For myself, I

      • It's a value-add for those 'forced' to use Windows. Your options otherwise are maintain a Linux box (in a VM, dual booting or a dedicated machine) use ported applications which mightn't receive the love their Linux-native cousins do or use cygwin.

        What Windows lacks is a decent package manager (and I've tried Chocolatey). So the alternative is that every major vendor, from Google to Mozilla to Adobe runs there own crapware background updater service. Synaptic and apt-get would be a huge improvement, so if th

      • For myself, I can't see any reason to use this Ubuntu-on-Windows. I have Linux test systems and I have Windows test systems.

        Likewise, I run a Linux/Windows test system. It has a unified filesystem, under which files can be accessed transparently of the actual box on which they reside.

        The Windows boxes run BASH and Perl scripts, but under Cygwin. As far as I can tell, this Ubuntu on Windows is completely useless for me because (unlike Cygwin) the environment does not have access to the full filesystem of th

        • by t0y ( 700664 )

          As far as I can tell, this Ubuntu on Windows is completely useless for me because (unlike Cygwin) the environment does not have access to the full filesystem of the Windows boxes.

          It does although there are some gotchas with regards to permissions (same with cygwin). And the next version will let wsl interact with windows binaries.

      • by serviscope_minor ( 664417 ) on Monday January 16, 2017 @09:56AM (#53675921) Journal

        For myself, I can't see any reason to use this Ubuntu-on-Windows.

        It's for those who want the beginner friendliness of command-line Unix with the stability and security of Windows.

    • MS is worried about staying relevant to IT geeks and Android developers. I welcome the changes if MS can get this shit together as competition ends monopolistic companies according to economics 101. If you do not want to use WIndows then don't.

      VS 2015 includings Android emulators and SDK's that use IOS, Windows Phone, and Android for mobile developers. I like this as I do not want to buy a mac just to port an application to IOS.

  • How are these people thinking they are qualified to write an OS-like subsystem, let alone a full OS?

  • Dear Microsoft (Score:4, Interesting)

    by MrKaos ( 858439 ) on Monday January 16, 2017 @12:57AM (#53674853) Journal

    stty intr

    will remap the interrupt key to any thing you want. Try using DEL, as it was mapped on some Unix systems. It was only changed to ctrl-C to make it easier for DOS users moving to Linux.

  • by paulpach ( 798828 ) on Monday January 16, 2017 @01:19AM (#53674927)

    WSL is better than cygwin. It is a lot faster and it has apt-get instead of that dreadful install wizard that cygwin has.

    However, the console in windows is stuck in the 80's. It is the same DOS command prompt that we saw in windows 3.1. The terminal emulators in linux or macOS support multiple tabs, text selection that reaches the end of the line instead of a rectangular shape, split panes, your default directory is your home directory.

    Now someone will raise their hand and say "PowerShell ISE". It looks promising, but at this point it is unusable because console programs cannot read input in PowerShell ISE

    Until they have a console from this century, WSL is worth using only when you don't have linux or macOS available.

    • If you install an x server - there are quite a few of them - then you can run pretty much any Linux-based terminal. It works fine - it was the first thing I tried.

    • Install an X server and run your konsole of choice.

      You'd still need an xserver for raw clients like rxvt. But my idea would be that they can work on integration with the popular cross-platform toolkits such as Qt/GTK+ etc so that a dynamically linked Linux GUI binary would render using Win32 native widgets, without need for an X11/Wayland server. (A .so acting as a shim for a windows .dll)

  • What, doesn't ctrl-z; kill %1 work? What's the point?

  • It's been a while since I've been able to break out the old motto.

    Next step: Extend!

  • I'll fix it: "But for people doing serious work with Linux command-line apps, not having Ctrl-C is a little like driving a car when only the front brakes work...and you have to type out the entire car stop command by hand on a keyboard one key at a time."
    • by eWarz ( 610883 )
      Only because that they live in a world where the only way to stop a car is by dragging your feet Flintstone style. YABBA DABBO DOO!

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