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United States Businesses Software The Almighty Buck

India's Infosys To Hire 10,000 American Workers After Trump Criticism (bloomberg.com) 216

India's Infosys said it plans to hire 10,000 Americans in the next two years, following criticism from the Trump administration that the company and other outsourcing firms are unfairly taking jobs away from U.S. workers. From a report on Bloomberg: Infosys, which employs about 200,000 people around the world, will expand its local hiring in the U.S. while adding four hubs to research technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning. The first location will open in Indiana in August 2017 and is expected to create 2,000 jobs for American workers by 2021, the company said.
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India's Infosys To Hire 10,000 American Workers After Trump Criticism

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  • Yes! (Score:2, Redundant)

    Infosys making America great again!
  • by byteherder ( 722785 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @10:43AM (#54340697)
    I didn't think you could hire 10,000 new IT workers for minimum wage?
    • by SniffTheGlove ( 1261240 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:39AM (#54341105)

      And i pity these workers all being employed to ring people up pretending to be Microsoft claiming their Windows PC are sending reports that it broken and needs fixing!!!

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      I didn't think you could hire 10,000 new IT workers for minimum wage?

      Why not? Except don't start with IT worker. Start with people who barely have a high-school education, then educate/train them in IT. That's all you have to do - as long as they can punch a few keys in a keyboard, that's all you need.

      That's about the quality of the people you get from these companies anyways. Add in a few of those signs that say "Work From Home! Earn $$$" and there you go.

      • Start with people who barely have a high-school education, then educate/train them in IT.

        I don't have a high school diploma. But I do have two associate degrees and a handful of certifications. I'm 20+ years into my technical career.

        That's all you have to do - as long as they can punch a few keys in a keyboard, that's all you need.

        That's fine for level-entry help desk positions. As people gain more experience, they can move into other areas like desktop support, PC deployments and data center operations. I'm currently doing InfoSec remediation.

        That's about the quality of the people you get from these companies anyways.

        From my experience with interviewing at a few Indian contracting agencies, they're looking for Americans to "diversify" their ranks and still do the

    • by mwvdlee ( 775178 )

      "Planning" to hire 10.000 employees.

      Just like I'm "Planning" to be a billionaire by the end of the year.

    • For $10 per hour in Silicon Valley? Absolutely. A few years ago a small company lured me in to interview for a $25 per hour position and tried to browbeat me into accepting at $10 per hour. I told them to bugger off.
  • by ohnocitizen ( 1951674 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @10:43AM (#54340705)
    It's still a race to the bottom, now it's just going to be done in a way that's harder to criticize. I wonder how this will impact salaries and the job market.
    • Anybody here who would work for Infosys?

      They'll be lucky to get C student, recent college graduates, useless air thieves to apply. Apparently, just like in India.

      • by byteherder ( 722785 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:01AM (#54340831)

        Anybody here who would work for Infosys?

        I used to work for Infosys a long time ago. I have to say that they are as dishonest as their reputation.

      • by ranton ( 36917 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:02AM (#54340839)

        Anybody here who would work for Infosys?

        They'll be lucky to get C student, recent college graduates, useless air thieves to apply. Apparently, just like in India.

        I don't even work for companies that use Infosys, let alone work for Infosys directly. I'm not opposed to using consultants, but Infosys, Tata, and WiPro are blacklisted for me. I find it hard to believe I would have executive level buy in to create quality enterprise software systems if they are already willing to use these companies. For a while I just used this as a red flag to investigate the company further, but after consistently being disappointed with what I found I just treat the usage of these outsourcing shops as a complete deal breaker.

        I am a big fan of the idea of the H1B program and believe immigrants are the primary thing which has made and continues to make our country great, but companies like Infosys are a blight on our society with no redeeming value I can see.

        • A very smart stance I would say. I also like your last bit since not everybody is aware enough to realize immigrants that are coming in to stay here forever and to help the US become better are great people. I will quote:

          I am a big fan of the idea of the H1B program and believe immigrants are the primary thing which has made and continues to make our country great, but companies like Infosys are a blight on our society with no redeeming value I can see.

          • Most visa workers are not immigrants. Some may become immigrants, sure, but they are two different things.

            • by ranton ( 36917 )

              Most visa workers are not immigrants. Some may become immigrants, sure, but they are two different things.

              In January 2010 there were 12.6 million permanent visa (green card) holders in the US. (source [migrationpolicy.org]) In 2013 there were about 1.4 million temporary visa holders working in the US. (source [epi.org])

              While not all green card holders are working, it is clear that most visa workers are immigrants. Probably around 80-90%. All temporary visa holders are not immigrants, by definition, but that is clearly not what you meant since you used the word "most". Then again I don't think you knew what you meant, or understand the actual

        • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:31AM (#54341043)

          I worked for a competitor - Keane, which was bought by an Indian Outsourcer but kept the keane name. They were bought by NTT as I was leaving.

          It was a medium sized insurance company. They didn't like paying their IT staff the salaries they earned, let alone the generous retirement package they gave to everyone. They fired the IT staff and Keane hired them back, cutting the fat in the process.

          They would hire graduates in India at 1/10th the salary, but then they would need to employ 10 of them to do the same amount of programming, and it was always poor, and I mean always.

          On the infrastructure side we might find one good candidate out of 20, and of course the minute that person could find a better job in India they were gone, and not that I blame them.

          The Business suffered, and the whole thing cost far more money than what they started with, but the line of CEOs, CFOs and CIOs that made the decision and stuck by it all left with very large salaries and golden parachutes, only to go off to the next financial services firm and do the same thing again. Its all a total shame. No one saves money on this stuff, it just sounds good.

          Meanwhile salaries at Keane were completely stagnant. They would implement some bonuses for the very high performers that were onshore, but there were zero salary increases. I and other high performers could get better jobs elsewhere, and we did, leaving the company with only people they didn't really want.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Tablizer ( 95088 )

            They would hire graduates in India at 1/10th the salary, but then they would need to employ 10 of them to do the same amount of programming, and it was always poor, and I mean always.

            Companies who are quality-ignorant software cheapskates will probably be cheapskates with citizen labor also and suck no matter what, and end up later throwing yet more labor into the pile to put out fires they created themselves. Eventually it may sink the company. But in the shorter term, PHB's will do PHB things.

          • by HornWumpus ( 783565 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @12:08PM (#54341343)

            Never work for insurance companies or any other business that _sells_ pure commodities. They are run by and for the benefit of marketers, as that is all that matters.

            When IT is just overhead, you get treated like pure overhead. Work somewhere that you job actually makes a difference.

        • You would be surprised at what companies hire Tata/Infosys/etc. I remember a recent interview I had last year with a small company where the VP told me that security had no ROI. When I asked him what he would do if/when a breach happened, he said he would just call Accenture, they come in with their battalion of consultants, get everything fixed, and business would continue.

          • Basically, he came right out and said: 'I don't have a clue about anything related to computers or consultancies...'

            That VP is going to get the rogering of a lifetime. If he ever calls Accenture for anything...he'll be bleeding from the asshole as well as several stab/bullet wounds used by consultants that prefer 'fresh holes' for fucking.

        • I am a big fan of the idea of the H1B program and believe immigrants are the primary thing which has made and continues to make our country great

          The H1B program is specifically designed to prevent the workers from staying any longer than the particular employer needs them. I'd be all for a program that allows skilled works to immigrate, but H1B is about making them indentured servants for a company with no negotiating leverage -- not making them citizens.

          • by slew ( 2918 )

            I am a big fan of the idea of the H1B program and believe immigrants are the primary thing which has made and continues to make our country great

            The H1B program is specifically designed to prevent the workers from staying any longer than the particular employer needs them. I'd be all for a program that allows skilled works to immigrate, but H1B is about making them indentured servants for a company with no negotiating leverage -- not making them citizens.

            Of course the US *already* has a program that allows skilled workers to immigrate w/o bein indentured servants. It's called a green card. Green cards even have different preferences for highly skilled employees (e.g., EB1, EB2), and even not-so skilled ones (EB-3).

            The "problem" is that green cards are geographically constrained. If you are from any country but China, India, and the Philippines, you don't even need to mess with an H1b, just apply for a green card immediately. The "problem" is only exper

      • by Cederic ( 9623 )

        Anybody here who would work for Infosys?

        Well, if I wanted the consultancy lifestyle and valued money over satisfaction then yes. I have skills they desperately need and they'd pay handsomely for them.

        I just don't hate myself that much yet. Maybe when I'm ready for a 3-4 year earnings burst ahead of retirement.

        • Consutancies...hire competent people and pay handsomely?

          Why would they do that when they could hire an incompetent recent college graduate and charge their clients the same rate. You'd bill fewer hours getting it done than the incompetent would bill not getting it done.

          • by Cederic ( 9623 )

            Well, you send the competent people in, they wow the decision makers, provide actual thought leadership, insight and competence, and win the business.

            Then you roll in the cheap nasty clowns and charge Cirque du Soleil prices for them.

      • That depends; what's it like to work at Infosys? My currently employer (in Texas) is barely paying above minimum wage, the working conditions suck, they don't provide health insurance, and they don't give the legally-required breaks. If the Infosys job fixed at least 2 of those issues, I'd move across the country to work there.
        • Your cheap, they might actually hire you. You're not competent are you? That would be a deal breaker for them.

      • C student used to mean you were average. These days I wonder though, because the way some of my friends act around their kids anything less than a 4.2 GPA is failure.

        Let's say C is below average grades for a student. Ok, so why act like below average wages isn't fair?

        Americans need good paying jobs, but perhaps not everyone is qualified to have the best job.

  • Typo (Score:5, Funny)

    by Baby Duck ( 176251 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @10:53AM (#54340781) Homepage
    They meant to hire 10,000 more in India and accidentally did it in Indiana, instead.
  • by linuxguy ( 98493 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @10:57AM (#54340811) Homepage

    It's like Trump saying that he will actually donate money he raised for veterans, to veterans. Did not happen until somebody found out that he was not doing it and shamed him into following through.

    These "commitments" from Infosys are about the same quality. If there is no law behind it, and they can bribe Trump by buying a condo in his tower at high price, then the matter is settled.

    Some of you are under the illusion that Trump is working for you. When it is clear that he is working for himself and couldn't give two hoots about you.

    • It's like Trump saying that he will actually donate money he raised for veterans, to veterans. Did not happen until somebody found out that he was not doing it and shamed him into following through.

      These "commitments" from Infosys are about the same quality. If there is no law behind it, and they can bribe Trump by buying a condo in his tower at high price, then the matter is settled.

      Some of you are under the illusion that Trump is working for you. When it is clear that he is working for himself and couldn't give two hoots about you.

      Or simply lay them off once the spotlight is no longer on them. Now, if the H1B laws were changed to limit the number any one company of nation can have then we might see some substantive sustainable changes.

      • by ghoul ( 157158 )

        And your racism leaks through. Limit on one company makes sense but limit on one country?

        • And your racism leaks through. Limit on one company makes sense but limit on one country?

          I said that because otherwise the company will simply create wholly owned entities to skirt the requirements. I see that in cases where a company grows to big to be considered a small business and simply creates a new sub to qualify for set asides; the limit would apply to all nations and not target any one and thus prevent companies from gaming the system, but thanks for playing the racism card.

    • Some of you are under the illusion that Trump is working for you. When it is clear that he is working for himself and couldn't give two hoots about you.

      Help me understand how that is any different than any president in the last 50 years. Damn the Democrats for rigging the primaries. Given the choice between two highly toxic candidates a protest vote is not unreasonable.

      • by linuxguy ( 98493 )

        > Given the choice between two highly toxic candidates a protest vote is not unreasonable.

        Regardless of how much anybody may like Hillary. Comparing her to Trump is unfair. If you think Trump and Hillary are "equally" bad for leading this country, then our thought process is different enough that a discussion on any topic would be a useless exercise.

  • by Shotgun ( 30919 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @10:58AM (#54340815)

    Infosys is one of those companies abusing H1B visas, aren't they?

    They're just trying to get the scrutiny off themselves?

  • I'm an American working for an Indian company - one of Infosys' competitors. You really can't blame the Indian companies as it's the onshore CIO who's outsourcing this stuff and the executive team who makes the decision to outsource to offshore. I've said it a buncha times - all we did was respond to an RFP. It's not Infosys' fault - since the standard of living is lower in India than it is here salaries are also lower. If you don't want Infosys, Wipro, Accenture and the like running your IT perhaps it'
    • by zerofoo ( 262795 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:13AM (#54340903)

      Are you certain all the employees of these outsourcing companies have valid credentials?

      Are you certain these workers were not displacing American workers at lower wages?

      Are you certain all these workers were either as qualified or better qualified than the workers they replaced?

      Are you certain all these workers were working in the locations specified on the visa?

      If not, then these companies were violating the law. It is the H-1B holder's responsibility to verify and validate these terms. Your defense of "we just responded to an RFP" will not defend you in a court of law.

      These companies hold the visas - it is their responsibility to ensure the hiring company is not using them to violate labor laws.

      "Just following orders" is not a good defense in court.

      • by ghoul ( 157158 )

        Well on the question of qualification, they are able to do the job which means the qualifications they have are enough for the job and they had overqualified folks doing mundane IT jobs. If a PhD works as a babysitter and is somehow able to convince the parents to pay 50 dollars an hour and then the parent replaces them with a 20 dollar an hour babysitter, the PhD really has no right to complain. The PhD would be better off doing something which is actually worth 50 dollars and which the teenager cant do.

        • The qualifications issue is one of false or unequal credentials. Diploma mills are a problem in many parts of the world:

          http://timesofindia.indiatimes... [indiatimes.com]

          There have been accusations by many that some outsourcing firms do not adequately vet the credentials of the candidates they bring over on an H-1B visa.

          I suspect a credentials audit of the visa holders would find that some do not possess the credentials they claim to have earned.

      • ..."Just following orders" is not a good defense in court.

        Agreed, and if Indian companies are violating US labor laws there should indeed be consequences but I thought for this discussion we were talking about legal hires. Illegal hires is a whole 'nother matter :)

        I can only speak to my own experience but we're seeing a fairly large departure of talent mainly because the company doesn't quite pay market and even the H1B holders are moving on to greener pastures. I've been here for five years and am paid slightly above market, but my company has decided that em

      • all the employees of these outsourcing companies have valid credentials?

        That's one place I always felt like I was at a disadvantage relative to H1B's - I did my undergrad at a relatively no-name college here in the US (it was cheap and close to home). Now, whenever somebody reads my resume and doesn't see MIT, Stanford, or Harvard on it, they figure, "never heard of it, probably a degree from a diploma mill". On the other hand, who the hell, in America, knows the difference between the University of Hyderabad and the University of Mumbai?

    • by Goldsmith ( 561202 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:21AM (#54340957)

      I think you can blame those guys. It's not "just" responding to an RFP. Because of my work title, I get marketing and sales calls from the business end of these companies all the time (they want to convince me I need to put out an RFP, and that they can help write it). Trying to game the sales/business process isn't new, and could be considered firmly American. Where they lose me are the arguments that engineering labor is a commodity and that my business culture is less important than labor cost.

      Now, keep in mind that I have never asked for anything from them. They come to me and my business partners making these arguments early and often to get us thinking about engineering a certain way. Enough effort like this can shift the standards in a field. They have made a concerted effort to set the standard for software to treat most programmers as commodities. Ultimately this is the problem. The standards they set for the field culturally and economically are not in the best interests of either the workers or the owners.

      Also, they make it harder for me to get my PhD scientists H1-Bs when they need them.

    • by shuz ( 706678 )

      Accenture is an Irish company [wikipedia.org]. It has about 33% of its workforce as Indian based labor, 12% United States, and 12.5% Filipino. Since the company is a global operation one could argue that they hire plenty of US Americans. Compared to Wipro and Infosys, both India based companies, Accenture operates under a different business model. Its heritage also stems from a US based company. IBM is a better example of a competitor and business model.

    • I'm an American working for an Indian company - one of Infosys' competitors. You really can't blame the Indian companies as it's the onshore CIO who's outsourcing this stuff and the executive team who makes the decision to outsource to offshore. I've said it a buncha times - all we did was respond to an RFP. It's not Infosys' fault - since the standard of living is lower in India than it is here salaries are also lower. If you don't want Infosys, Wipro, Accenture and the like running your IT perhaps it's the American companies that need to consider hiring American. The other thing is that if offshore resources arrive here on an H1B visa they're free to seek other employment. IME onshore salaries are generally competitive or you lose people.

      Great point. They could also actually create an in house IT org staffed with people who actual have a stake in the company's future. Anecdotally, I was talking to someone who was involved in an offshoring "train your replacement" effort. They trained the replacements on the exact procedures, which would work in 10% of the cases. They figured the offshore staff could learn on their own how to handle the other 90% once they were gone and let the company deal with the fallout. They were in compliance with the

    • by ranton ( 36917 )

      You really can't blame the Indian companies as it's the onshore CIO who's outsourcing this stuff and the executive team who makes the decision to outsource to offshore.

      No, I really can blame both. If someone pays a hit-man to kill his spouse, I want both of them to be punished. The hit-man certainly shouldn't be able to claim he was just responding to an RFP.

      In the case of Infosys, they are even more complicit since their marketing and sales claim they are providing a quality service when in fact they are preying on either inept management or ineffectual board / shareholder governance.

  • by zerofoo ( 262795 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:07AM (#54340871)

    If these companies broke US employment and immigration laws, then they need to be banned from operating in the US.

    These guys are attempting to save their businesses - nothing more.

    Tata, Infosys, Wipro, Cognizant and all the other body shops need to be taught a lesson - break the law and there will be real consequences to your businesses.

    • Re:No...hell no. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ghoul ( 157158 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:33AM (#54341063)

      Nope thats not how international business works. Union Carbide broke Indian safety laws and caused a gas leak which killed more people than Saddam ever did in his Chemical Weapons campaigns. Instead of standing trial the US embassy spirited out the Union Carbide execs in the middle of the night on a plane chartered for the embassy. Govts. support their multinationals even when they play hardball overseas. Indian govt has made it very clear they see the H1B as a trade issue and not an immigration issue and any restrictions on H1B and L1 will be retaliated on with tariffs on American goods being exported to India. e.g. India can do a China and ban Facebook, Google, Amazon from India. Local alternatives will grow (its not like Indians cant code. Most of the Facebbok,Google and Amazon code is written by Indians anyway). Facebook has more Indian users than the entire adult population of USA so its not a trivially small market.
      India does not because it has free trade agreements with US. USA will not hamper the export of software dev services by messing with H1B because the tech lobby in the US does not want to be shut out of exporting services to India.

      • Nope thats not how international business works. Union Carbide broke Indian safety laws and caused a gas leak which killed more people than Saddam ever did in his Chemical Weapons campaigns. Instead of standing trial the US embassy spirited out the Union Carbide execs in the middle of the night on a plane chartered for the embassy. Govts. support their multinationals even when they play hardball overseas.

        What you mean is that elites look out for their own. I doubt the average citizen would care if a high level executive responsible for criminal level neglect was punished. The elite on the other hand do care and will bend the rules to protect their own no matter what. The sooner we get past arguing about social issues of little consequence the sooner we can get to the things of huge consequence - like a declining middle class and almost unparalleled inequality. This is why I consider SJWs the useful idio

        • The sooner we get past arguing about social issues of little consequence

          I wouldn't necessarily say the social issues are of no consequence, but they're certainly of no consequence to the elite. The elite do not give a fuck if abortion is legal or not. They are smart enough to avoid unwanted pregnancies, and abortions are never unavailable if you have enough money.

          This is why I consider SJWs the useful idiots of the 1%.

          Undeniably. If I were an evil capitalist oppressor and I were worried poor people might actually threaten my cheddar with all this talk about "income inequality" and "the gap between CEO pay and worker pay" the way I'

  • Misdirection (Score:5, Interesting)

    by gatkinso ( 15975 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:15AM (#54340921)

    When they "discover" that they cannot hire/lure 2000 tech workers in/to Indiana, they will make the claim the indeed there is a tech labor shortage in the US.

    • When they "discover" that they cannot hire/lure 2000 tech workers in/to Indiana, they will make the claim the indeed there is a tech labor shortage in the US.

      Oh I thought they were just going to change the name of Bangalore to Indiana or something!

  • by ErichTheRed ( 39327 ) on Tuesday May 02, 2017 @11:20AM (#54340953)

    It seems like Infosys is trying to get ahead of any criticism regarding the way they use the H-1B program. I do systems integration work so we work with a wide range of these companies. I've worked with people and software from Infosys and TCS as well as the lower-tier guys like Mindtree and NIIT. The problem is that even if you bring the work to somewhere like Indiana, you can't change the fundamental business model and so you'll still get less than optimal service.

    All of these consulting firms, whether they're body shops like Infosys and TCS, or white-shoe management consulting firms, operate on a very familiar business model:
    - Rely on a gold-plated sales team and rockstar consulting team to sell the dream and come up with the initial proposal
    - Once the deal is signed, replace the rockstars with fresh grads or less-than-rockstar experienced consultants for the client-facing stuff, like collecting requirements or delivering PowerPoints.
    - In the case of an outsourcing, send in a group to collect all the information about the company's business processes. Body shops sending the work offshore typically use their H-1Bs for this task, while the fancy consulting firms fly in the graduating class of the Ivy League business schools; it's a very common first job for that crowd.
    - Send everything that actually involves work offshore or to other cheap "delivery centers" to maximize the profit on the deal

    The problem is that whether these cheap delivery centers are offshore or onshore, I think they'll have big problems staffing them with qualified people. Consulting firms squeeze every last dime out of outsourcing deals because they have to break even...and in many cases they have to support a huge raft of executive salaries with big expense accounts on top of that. Consulting firms think nothing of flying senior people in from wherever, for months at a time on full reimbursement, and their customers end up paying for that. When you get down to the people who would be working in Infosys's Indiana office, they're going to try to pay minimum wage or slightly above because the entire model is making the actual work cheap while putting a good face on for the customer.

    I don't think I'd like to work there, simply because they have a reputation among experienced IT people and developers. Just because you move the people here doesn't mean the model changes. It will still be a body shop mentality where you're cranking out random Java or .NET code for some corporate website or managing a company's IT systems poorly from remote. At the very least, however, it is domestic entry level work for newbies. Hopefully those newbies will endure a year or two in the middle of nowhere, then use the experience to move on.

    • by ghoul ( 157158 )

      If the work is critical it does not get outsourced. If it gets outsourced its not critical. Why would you use anything but fresh graduates for non critical work?

    • by Kagato ( 116051 )

      There's plenty of American consulting firms hiring. I can't see why they would choose Infosys. Maybe a college grad that didn't know any better. The minima they would pay an H1B is 60K. Which is similar to a college grad. I shudder to think of the bad habits they'll pick up and having Infosys on the resume may not be the best thing for the career.

  • I wonder if India is planing on draining the brightest minds from the USA in retaliation. Get a few of the best, and it's worth the other few thousand so-so minds they bring in.
  • Too little, too late. Good bye Infosys

  • I was very recently working for Infosys, the company is horrible, their intranet for everything is a nightmare. I would never work for them again. They are all very nice, but their internal management is clueless and most projects are staffed only by overseas workers because the management make sup ridiculous requirements project positions so they can claim they were unable to find a worker in the US for the job.
    • by nomad63 ( 686331 )
      And I bet you, none of those qualifications are actually needed for the position of service desk representative they placed the H-1B servant into
  • all will be of Indian descent.
  • But, what are they willing to pay for those 10K workers ? The same amount of poverty level wages they pay to their indentured servants or actual American standard wages. If it is the former, no one will show up and they will say, "we offered but no one took the jobs" and give themselves a public show of legitimacy; If they go with the latter approach, they will piss off their workforce on H-1B visa, as there will be a huge pay gap between two groups. Doesn't sound sincere to me.
  • Is this why email notifications from "The Hill" [thehill.com] are sponsored by InfoSys this morning?
  • I did time for one of those Indian companies. The work was training the offshore team to do the work of the America workers who had been RIFFed. The Americans had to assist with the training or lose their termination compensation. They (the Hyderabad-based IT company) wouldn't allow remote work so I had to move to NJ for a 6 mo contract. They wouldn't pay for travel or any relocation costs. Their people were flying to & from India pretty regularly. They wouldn't offer or cover cost of my Healthcare (COBRA at that time). Time spent filling out time cards and entering hours into their dogshit time tracking system were not billable. Pay rate was 1/3 lower than what HAD been my minimum. I was desperate for anything at the time. And they offered to hire me away from the company I was subbing for, which was forbidden by the contract.

    It was not a good experience.
  • It's one thing to just poach staff, but Infosys would have to do (better) for citizens what it did for H1-b's - train and place displaced individuals with employers.

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