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Ubuntu Operating Systems Security Software

Ubuntu 16.10 Reaches End of Life (softpedia.com) 164

prisoninmate shares a report from Softpedia: Today, July 20, 2017, is the last day when the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) was supported by Canonical as the operating system now reached end of life, and it will no longer receive security and software updates. Dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as the Yakkety Yak, Ubuntu 16.10 was launched on October 13, 2016, and it was a short-lived release that only received nine (9) months of support through kernel updates, bug fixes, and security patches for various components. Starting today, you should no longer use Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) on your personal computer, even if it's up-to-date. Why? Because, in time, it will become vulnerable to all sort of attacks as Canonical won't provide security and kernel updates for this release. Therefore, all users are urged to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) immediately using the instructions here.
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Ubuntu 16.10 Reaches End of Life

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  • by KiloByte ( 825081 ) on Thursday July 20, 2017 @09:56PM (#54850359)

    Not sure why we would care -- it's just an old already-replaced short lived release. The release Ubuntu users should care about is 14.04 (supported until 2019-04) as it's the last one with a sane init.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 20, 2017 @10:56PM (#54850547)

      I have been trying not to care about this init stuff. Through a series of upgrades I've ended up with one machine still stuck with upstart and another on systemd, and I didn't want to get involved in this discussion. I figured I'd just adapt to whatever.

      Let's just say I have reached the point of caring. :-/

      One small thing to start: how the fuck is it not the default behaviour of journalctl to linewrap so you can actually see all the errors?

      I am no sysadmin. I've been using Linux for about 24 years, day-in, day-out, in one capacity or another (back from the 0.99pl12 days, stack of floppy disks, 486 with 8 megs of RAM and a tiny hard disk) and I'm still confident and happy saying I am no sysadmin. I accept my limits; I know I am a developer just *using* it with admittedly pretty significant day-to-day acquired knowledge, I'm not operating it as a sysadmin with studied expertise. I look like an expert to others; I don't feel like an expert.

      So I expected some relearning and some frustration, but fuck me I didn't expect to feel patronised.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        how the fuck is it not the default behaviour of journalctl to linewrap so you can actually see all the errors?

        Why the fuck do you expect anything shat out by Lennart Poettering to be user friendly?

      • by Anonymous Coward

        One small thing to start: how the fuck is it not the default behaviour of journalctl to linewrap so you can actually see all the errors?

        Lennart Poettering should be hit on the head with an actual log until he recognises the importance of logging (real, or traditional).

        • Can't we just etch a log into the sides of a steel bar and hit him upside the head with that instead? Maybe pass it on and play our own little version of pinatad?

          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by dbIII ( 701233 )
            Careful - that's far more explicit than what Lennart screamed was a "death threat" a few years back.
            He takes comments like yours seriously. It's apparently OK for him to describe a fantasy about people like you collecting bitcoins to pay a hitman to go after him (and for him to say it "really happened" - yeah right) but he's got too thin a skin to allow you a fantasy.

            What I'm trying to say is "jokes" like that just reinforce his "us and them" attitude, where everyone who isn't his fanboy is apparently not
            • Awww... so you're saying I might make poor 'lil Poettering (however the hell you spell his name) cry. Awww, such a shame. Waaaaahhh....

              If he can't take a joke, that's his problem. If he, as a supposedly respected software developer, has nothing to do but scour Slashdot topics and find discussions that include him and whine because people make fun of him... then, well, that's actually pretty pathetic. He can cry all he wants.

      • One small thing to start: how the fuck is it not the default behaviour of journalctl to linewrap so you can actually see all the errors?

        It is definetely not journalctl's job to linewrap anything - your terminal should do that.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 21, 2017 @12:04AM (#54850765)

          And it isn't journalctl's job to truncate log lines to the width of the terminal. Yet it does.

        • by thegarbz ( 1787294 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @03:01AM (#54851113)

          Journalctrl is not a grep of a dumb text file. It's job is to do whatever it was designed to do by the author.

          Fortunately the author made it quite configurable. Just export SYSTEMD_PAGER=less, and journalctl will look 100% identical to your previous ways of working. Or just ignore journalctl and set it to output to syslog and it will actually be 100% identical to your previous way of working (with the addition of boot messages in the syslog).

          Complaining about something more configurable that offers a complete compatibility with your own way of working looks childish.

          • by ( 4475953 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @06:46AM (#54851513)

            Maybe they should use sane defaults?

      • by Zero__Kelvin ( 151819 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @12:50AM (#54850867) Homepage
        The output is paged through less by default, and long lines are "truncated" to screen width. The hidden part can be viewed by using the left-arrow and right-arrow keys. [freedesktop.org]. You could also use 'alias' to change the default behavior, or use other methods. As usual when people hate on systemd, you are complaining about systemd because you don't understand it and couldn't be bothered to learn what you could have learned with 2 minutes of googling. It literally would have taken less time to learn about it than complain about it.
        • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 21, 2017 @02:27AM (#54851029)

          Considering that the default behaviour for the past forty years, for all Unix systems, has been to print out lines unaltered, wrapping them when necessary, why the hell do users have to adjust to new behaviour? This is altering the system's behaviour, contrary to end user expectations, for no good reason that I am able to discern.

          Two minutes of googling? Multiply that by however many thousands of sysadmins are out there and having to deal with this bullshit. Multiply that by however many times a sysadmin gets tripped up before baking it into a system image as a default, plus the number of times they get caught with a new release.

          Arguing "you can change the behaviour back, quit whining" simply doesn't cut it in the context of systems that are managed by the thousands.

          • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

            by thegarbz ( 1787294 )

            Considering that the default behaviour for the past forty years

            Oh dear, someone moved your cheese.

            • Shittest book on anything ever.

              But I must take my hat off to you for your time management skills. Most people would find shilling for the 1% or Lennart Poettering a full time job on its own (no apostrophe - is it that hard?) but you manage to combine both.

              • shill

                verb
                verb: shilling; plural noun: shillings
                1.
                A term used on Slashdot to describe anyone who disagrees with you or has a differing opinion.

            • by dbIII ( 701233 )
              More that Lennert never knew where the cheese was before - but yes you have a point.
              The annoying thing is the number of changes and the ones (like killing all user processes on logout!!!!!!) that show he just didn't ask anyone before making the changes. Things like his comment "what tool was used to create a username with a number?" show he's not getting good advice about the environment he's working in - on top of things like the newbie mistake of not checking for valid inputs. That's pretty fucking chee
              • More that Lennert never knew where the cheese was before - but yes you have a point.

                That's the principle behind it. Someone moved my cheese is about your reaction to things that others do to you.

                Things like his comment "what tool was used to create a username with a number?

                Yeah he's a dick to users. Yeah his software has bugs. All of which has nothing to do with the fact that many of the complaints are people's inability to RTFM or to blame him for defaults which are in the domain of the distribution provider and nothing to do with him. I mean do you go and complain to GNU because the latest version of Raspberian ships by default without ls aliased to "ls --color"?

                Ma

                • by dbIII ( 701233 )

                  That's the principle behind it. Someone moved my cheese is about your reaction to things that others do to you.

                  I am very aware of the phrase as should be clear from me taking it one step more above. It's not just that "the cheese was moved" as in different behaviour, it's that Lennart is not taking the prior behaviour into account at all - he doesn't know where the "cheese" was in the first place and is not going to listen to anyone who does. It's not about improvements just different. It's a quick choic

          • This is altering the system's behaviour, contrary to end user expectations, for no good reason

            which should be considered a crime against humanity (well, against Unix philosophy, anyway), and punished by people using another distribution (but nuking from high orbit is fine in my books).

            Personally, I like the *BSDs.

          • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

            You're right. Instead of taking two minutes to solve your problem, you could take the same two minutes to put a bullet in your brain. Then you've solved everyone else's problem, too.

        • This! Not only can you change it through aliases but there are also specific environmental variables that can be set so journalctl adjusts its behaviour on a per use basis. The option the people who don't RTFM are looking for is "export SYSTEMD_PAGER=less"

        • by Anonymous Coward

          And people wonder why real sysadmins hate systemd. (hint... douchebags like yourself.)

        • by drinkypoo ( 153816 ) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Friday July 21, 2017 @08:19AM (#54851737) Homepage Journal

          It literally would have taken less time to learn about it than complain about it.

          The default in basically everything is to show full lines. But systemd wants to be different. Why? Because Poettering thinks Unix was done all wrong, and he's smarter than everyone else, and changing default behaviors on the console to be more like a GUI is a great idea. That's because he's a fucking child. His development stopped at maybe age twelve. It's all what he wants and what he thinks, and everyone else is dumber than him, right? Except a review of his code proves that's false. He's actually a shit coder with shit ideas and you're defending them because you're a shit person.

          • The default is what your distribution says it is, and your jealousy is telling. You aren't a mind reader, psychologist, or qualified / competent software engineer, so your ramblings about why it is that way are just that .. ignorant ramblings.
            • The default is what your distribution says it is,

              Yes, and that's a problem, because the default should be to provide expected behavior. Sun's former use of csh instead of sh was a problem, too. Just do the classic Unixy thing and leave it the hell alone. I for one do not comprehend why anyone would write even a bash-specific script for something like an init script.

              and your jealousy is telling.

              If I have to be him to have what he has, I don't want it.

              You aren't a mind reader, psychologist, or qualified / competent software engineer, so your ramblings about why it is that way are just that .. ignorant ramblings.

              And you aren't a functioning human being, but you're still permitted to post to Slashdot.

      • One small thing to start: how the fuck is it not the default behaviour of journalctl to linewrap so you can actually see all the errors?

        If you pipe journal control through anything like you would have done previously it defaults to linewrap.
        Given how much more it actually displays per line the no linewrapping is a bonus. It makes it much easier to read.

        Why do some distributions default to coloring ls and others not?
        Why do some distributions provide a short hand for ls -l --color and others not?
        Why is it that people get so upset about something when the new option is more configurable than the previous options. Add "export SYSTEMD_PAGER=less

        • by Anonymous Coward

          Nice strawmen there. Nobody is upset about distro differences or more flexible configuration. People are upset about the default changing. Existing infrastructure breaks, with very little justification. The correct approach is to use the new and flexible configuration options to default to a configuration that acts identical to what is already there. People that want the new shiny can change the config, people that want to get things done do not need to stop and wipe up the mess someone else made.

        • Why is it that people get so upset about something when the new option is more configurable than the previous options.

          NO, You just don't get it at all why should adding more configurability fuck with the well established defaults which zillions of lines of code and millions of dumb users totally depend on to get things done?

          This is something that is in the same league as casually kicking people in the shins for no reason, or spilling other people's drinks in a public bar, and you can't be surprised if i

          • Tell that to your distribution because it's them that changed your default. Yes the journald default is this but since it's configurable the distribution choose to not change it to match their old behaviour.
            • So instead of users working around Lennart's shitty designs the distro maintainers should do it?

              While I agree that's an inconvenience to fewer people and is therefore a slight improvement I can think of another step that would be even better. Can you?

              • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

                You seem to have a serious problem with changes that don't affect you. Use your power cable as a noose and hang yourself. You'll never be bothered by systemd again, you whiny shit-bag.

                • I love a well-reasoned argument. Could you point me to someone who could provide one, you smelly fat kiddy-diddler?

              • This is no different from all the thousands of other project where distributions change the default by supplying their own configurations or patching the project in question. Since the maintainers on Ubuntu have decided to not change the default behaviour of journalctl then they have decided that this way is not shitty but better. You obviously does not agree, but then no one is forcing you to either. Myself I have yet to form an opinion on the matter, sometimes I think that it's better and sometimes I thin
          • NO, You just don't get it at all why should adding more configurability fuck with the well established defaults

            Implying your retarded* well established defaults are the best way.

            which zillions of lines of code

            That was automatically handled via the backwards compatibility. If this change broke anything then the person shouldn't be coding let alone coding millions of lines.

            and millions of dumb users totally depend

            And "dumb" users are the reason we make changes and improve things rather than staying locked in some course because of ... reasons.

            This is something that is in the same league as casually kicking people in the shins for no reason, or spilling other people's drinks in a public bar, and you can't be surprised if it leads to a bar brawl - it is the conventional way to start one.

            If that's what you think then you should seek psychiatric help. Just because someone moved your cheese doesn't mean the world is ending, and unlike

            • by Hognoxious ( 631665 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @08:39AM (#54851805) Homepage Journal

              Implying your retarded* well established defaults are the best way.

              It implies nothing of the sort. However breaking expectations is rarely a good idea.

              Is brake on the left & gas on the right intrinsically better than the other way round? No idea. But it's what people expect, and if you're going to change it then your awesome solution doesn't just need to be better - it needs to be vastly better.

              See also: qwerty.

              • Is brake on the left & gas on the right intrinsically better than the other way round?

                Funny you mention that. No problem with moving indicators and wipers, or gear sticks from the left to right. People adjust to that within a few minutes. People also didn't have a problem back when Ford had the accelerator on the steering wheel. But then only until very recently you could find motorbikes with the throttle on the left instead of the right. And the standards for bicycles require the front / back brake to be different on left hand drive vs right hand drive countries so you can indicate your tur

          • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

            Has the default behavior of journalctl changed? No? Then take your computer and use it to bludgeon yourself to death, you ultra-conservative whiny shit-face.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          > Add "export SYSTEMD_PAGER=less" to your environments

          Why doesn't it respect the PAGER environment variable? Why do we have to use a NEW variable in the SYSTEMD namespace?

          I mean... seriously? That's been the way you specify your desired pager for _decades_.

          > ...your incredible problems of personal preference will be a thing of the past.

          Heh. Maybe PAGER is a thing of the past. We all know that Poettering and the Systemd Cabal say that everything from the past must be swallowed into the systemd project

          • Why doesn't it respect the PAGER environment variable? Why do we have to use a NEW variable in the SYSTEMD namespace?

            Because log file outputs especially with the additional information added by systemd are now wider than before so it makes sense not wordwrap, the same can not be said for many other uses of less.

            Also because journalctl is a different program to less so why shouldn't it have its own config?

            I mean... seriously? That's been the way you specify your desired pager for _decades_.

            Nope. It's been the way you specify your desired pager settings under "less" for decades. Maybe journalctl isn't for you. Just set it up to dump to syslog and use less like you used to and let everyone else who is comfort

    • I suppose the 15.10 that I'm typing this on is even worse off, then?

      Funny that it's in better shape than the 14.04 LTS running on another machine in my house - that 14.04 has patched itself into all kinds of system-error complaints, and seems to be more crash prone - maybe because it runs Kodi all the time, but I like to think most of the problems are in the updates. The last update to Kodi that changed the whole user interface was particularly annoying.

  • Also, today (Score:5, Funny)

    by I'm New Around Here ( 1154723 ) on Thursday July 20, 2017 @09:57PM (#54850361)

    You should replace the batteries in your smoke alarm.

  • Nine Whole Months (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 20, 2017 @10:12PM (#54850411)

    But sixteen years is not enough for Windows XP?

    Bring on the excuses...

  • Misleading (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Why? Because, in time, it will become vulnerable to all sort of attacks

    This is misleading. The software is already vulnerable to all possible attacks. Over time, existing vulnerabilities might be exploited. Software does not become vulnerable because it is not 'supported'. That's not to say there is a risk, but the risk is not directly that the software is not supported.

    • Why? Because, in time, it will become vulnerable to all sort of attacks

      This is misleading. The software is already vulnerable to all possible attacks. Over time, existing vulnerabilities might be exploited. Software does not become vulnerable because it is not 'supported'. That's not to say there is a risk, but the risk is not directly that the software is not supported.

      You seem to have overlooked the phrase "in time". No one is saying that software magically becomes vulnerable the second support stops.

  • Rolling Release (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Philotomy ( 1635267 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @12:37AM (#54850827)
    This kind of thing is one reason I switched to a rolling release distro (Arch, in my case). I won't be going back.
    • Re:Rolling Release (Score:5, Insightful)

      by somenickname ( 1270442 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @01:18AM (#54850919)

      Meanwhile the people who use their computers to get work done use the LTS releases, Debian stable, CentOS, etc.

      • by arth1 ( 260657 )

        Meanwhile the people who use their computers to get work done use the LTS releases, Debian stable, CentOS, etc.

        Very different definitions of Long Term for those.
        Debian: 5 years
        CentOS: 10 years upstream support
        Red Hat: 10 years plus 4+ years of extended lifecycle support at extra cost.

        In many fields, 5 year isn't enough. The cost and complexity of replacing legacy software and hardware can be a showstopper. If you work in manufacturing, you have to be able to support customer installations that's more than 10 years old. Including being able to run development environments that actually work with the hardware in

      • I know what you're saying (I run CentOS servers, too), but for my workstation (yes, for professional use) and for personal (non-work) computers, I much prefer rolling release.
    • Re:Rolling Release (Score:5, Insightful)

      by thegarbz ( 1787294 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @03:06AM (#54851129)

      Because the ever moving target of rolling releases which could change at any moment are so much better than running the command "do-release-upgrade" every 6 or so months?

      • I've run both rolling and non-rolling distros over the years. All I can tell you is that, yes, I prefer a rolling release distro for my workstation. I've been running the same install of Arch for several years, now, and there have only been a couple times that applying updates caused me any issues. I run updates once or twice a week, and before running them I check the Arch news for any gotchas or pre-update tweaks I might need to perform (uncommon). Personally, I wouldn't run Arch on a production server,
      • by ottdmk ( 1376807 )
        The "ever moving target" can definitely be an issue. I'm not a Linux guy primarily (although I do run OpenSuSE and Steam-OS at home.) I'm mostly a FreeBSD guy (currently 11.0-RELEASE). I like the balance FreeBSD has struck. The base system is quite stable and is supported for long stretches of time. The ports system, on the other hand, is continually updated with the latest & greatest. Works for me.
    • I also switched to rolling release. It's called Windows 10.

    • things that roll hit bumps; rolling releases always break a given configuration and need fixing

      • That's possible (although I'd also say it's possible for non-rolling releases), but it hasn't been my experience with Arch. YMMV, of course. Some of it may be hardware and driver dependent.
  • This might be a bit of a novice or silly question, but is there a reason why this specific release of this specific GNU/Linux distro has a dedicated posting here on Slashdot?

    This isn't flame-bait and I'm not trolling... I'm actually trying to understand the process of selecting news-worthy submissions for posting. I can't recall seeing similar articles like this [either for earlier ubuntu distributions, or others] and I didn't see anything in the article that highlights this as special other than the unu
    • Probably because it's the last release of the 16 series?
      • by hackel ( 10452 )

        lol, what? "16 series?" There are two releases every year, and it's been that way since the beginning. It's not a "series". They aren't connected. If anything, it was the *second* release in the 16.04 LTS series if you consider 18.04 to be the start of a new LTS series. Still not remotely newsworthy.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      >the unusually short lifespan of this particular release

      It's not unusual. Ubuntu has been following a 6 month regular release schedule for years.

      >Is that the reason for the posting, or could it be something else?

      Judging from the submitter's posting history, he posts stories that appear on softpedia.com. He probably works for them and perhaps is the author of those articles.

      Once a upon a time, Slashdotters frowned on submissions by shills.

  • by Chris Mattern ( 191822 ) on Friday July 21, 2017 @09:07AM (#54851913)

    the developer said, "Don't talk back."

  • Constant churn is only good for development or hobby systems, otherwise use an LTS release supported for 5 years.

  • Yes, every incremental Ubuntu release only gets 6 months of extended support. It's been this way for many years. This is not a news story. Shame on you for reporting it, BeauHD. What has happened to the editorial standards on Slashdot?

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