Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Businesses The Almighty Buck

Amazon's New Refunds Policy Will 'Crush' Small Businesses, Outraged Sellers Say (cnbc.com) 335

Amazon sellers are up in arms over a new returns policy that will make it easier for consumers to send back items at the merchant's expense. From a report: Marketplace sellers who ship products from their home, garage or warehouse -- rather than using Amazon's facilities -- were told this week by email that starting Oct. 2, items they sell will be "automatically authorized" for return. That means a buyer will no longer need to contact the seller before sending an item back, and the merchant won't have the opportunity to communicate with the customer. If a consumer is returning an electronic device because it's difficult to use, for example, the seller won't be able to offer help before being forced to pay a refund. "Customers will be able to print a prepaid return shipping label via the Online Return Center instantly," the email said. Additionally, Amazon said that it's introducing "returnless refunds," a feature that the company said is "highly requested by sellers." The change enables sellers to offer a refund without taking back an item that may be expensive to ship and hard to resell.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Amazon's New Refunds Policy Will 'Crush' Small Businesses, Outraged Sellers Say

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:25PM (#54926813)

    Amazon isn't in the retail business. Amazon isn't in the cloud computing business. Amazon isn't in the logistics business. Amazon is in the business business. It is no longer The Everything Store; it is now the Everything Everything. It wants to be the platform around which all of the world's businesses depend.

    This is about as ambitious a mission as a company has ever launched, in my opinion -- and Amazon may be the first company with a justifiable claim to such ambition. Its only business constraints at this point are geopolitical, really. I believe it aims even higher in the long run: it is aiming to become the macroeconomic backbone of at least the Western world.

    When viewed in that context, traditional definitions of monopoly -- especially the most widely known definition of the state, which is based on market share within a specific industry -- almost feel antiquated. Jeff Bezos isn't JP Morgan; he's freaking Cohaagen from Total Recall.

    (To be very clear, I say all of this in admiration of Jeff Bezos, not in fear or criticism of him.)

    • Amazon isn't in the retail business. Amazon isn't in the cloud computing business. Amazon isn't in the logistics business. Amazon is in the business business. It is no longer The Everything Store; it is now the Everything Everything. It wants to be the platform around which all of the world's businesses depend.

      This is about as ambitious a mission as a company has ever launched, in my opinion -- and Amazon may be the first company with a justifiable claim to such ambition.

      Uh, a justifiable claim? Yeah right. There is no justification to annihilate the concept of competition by becoming the global proxy for "Everything". There isn't a justifiable need for it either.

      First rule of logistics; Don't become dependent on a single source provider.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        becoming the global proxy for "Everything".

        Do you realize that Amazon is the world's second biggest e-commerce company [alibaba.com]?

        It is silly to label them a monopoly when they aren't even the market leader.

        • by green1 ( 322787 )

          I think the claim is that Amazon is trying to get in to many more spaces that e-commerce. They are a major e-commerce player, but they are also trying to get in to many other areas as well.

        • Do you realize that Amazon is the world's second biggest e-commerce company?

          Different market. I don't want to have to deal with getting a quote or contacting a vendor to tell him what I want, I want to click on the "buy" button and buy it. Amazon does the latter. Alibaba, from every experience I've had with them, is the former.

          Yes, if I want to buy 10,000 widgets and need to find a Chinese manufacturer, Alibaba is where I'd go. If I want to buy one I'll go to Amazon. As soon as I see the "price" listed as "Get Quote", I know I'm spending too much time. And then there's the "price"

          • by sexconker ( 1179573 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @04:06PM (#54928385)

            Do you realize that Amazon is the world's second biggest e-commerce company?

            Different market. I don't want to have to deal with getting a quote or contacting a vendor to tell him what I want, I want to click on the "buy" button and buy it. Amazon does the latter. Alibaba, from every experience I've had with them, is the former.

            www.aliexpress.com

            In fact, Amazon's new policy is a direct result of Alibaba. People buy a bunch of shit wholesale from Alibaba and relist it on Amazon with huge markups. They "seller" on Amazon often never sees the product. They drop ship it straight to the customer who buys it off of Amazon.

            Amazon's new policy is a FUCK YOU to those "sellers". If Amazon doesn't touch the inventory then they assume it's drop shipped, and will let customers get instant refunds, no questions asked. This will quickly be abused.

        • by geekmux ( 1040042 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:51PM (#54927715)

          becoming the global proxy for "Everything".

          Do you realize that Amazon is the world's second biggest e-commerce company [alibaba.com]?

          It is silly to label them a monopoly when they aren't even the market leader.

          FFS, first or second place hardly matters when there are only two fucking players left. This isn't about "leaders". This is about destroying the market altogether. You can't point at the other monopoly to dismiss or justify the existence of the arrogant and soul-crushing behavior of market domination. It's become a pathetic joke to even have anti-monopoly laws on the books anymore. At this rate, the world will be reduced to a dozen mega-corps within the next decade or two, with Amazon being the "Everything Everything" proxy. The middle class will dissolve away just as the concept of competition will. In the end, there will only be the 0.0001%, and the rest of the enslaved planet.

          There are many dangerous addictions, but Greed is the one that will ultimately lead to our demise.

      • by green1 ( 322787 )

        Justifiable in this context doesn't speak to the morality of the ambition, only that the ambition is believable. It may be a bad idea, but Amazon can justifiably be claimed to be trying to do it.

        • Justifiable in this context doesn't speak to the morality of the ambition, only that the ambition is believable. It may be a bad idea, but Amazon can justifiably be claimed to be trying to do it.

          I think I'm rather justified in saying that corporate training related to morals and ethics shouldn't be mandated anymore when it clearly has fuck-all to do with business anymore.

    • by Ksevio ( 865461 )
      I would say Amazon is in all those businesses.
    • I am bob. The greatest and biggliest
    • > (To be very clear, I say all of this in admiration of Jeff Bezos, not in fear or criticism of him.)

      His goons are standing right behind you with a knife, aren't they?

  • After my return experience with NewEgg where I bought a defective gaming motherboard and took three days of back and forth emails with tech support before finally having to pay for my own return shipping I switched to Amazon. Yes, I'll pay $5 more for that motherboard, but it takes 30 seconds to return it and the replacement will arrive in 24 hours.

    • by mishehu ( 712452 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:54PM (#54927167)
      When it comes to computer equipment, I find it much easier to use Newegg to search. And also Newegg gets points from me for taking on patent trolls, while Amazon itself is a patent troll.
      • by Zenin ( 266666 )

        Much agreed, I too go to NewEgg's search first and salute their anti patent troll actions.

        And then after I find what I want to go buy it on Amazon.com.

        Sure, some see that as a dick move. But I look at places like BestBuy who have not only acknowledged that people do that, but embraced it: BestBuy is now more of a "show room" where they make a large chunk of their money simply renting the demo space to products, knowing full well most folks will actually buy online. They don't care, they don't need to, the

    • i havent gotten anything from them in a while but its always been painless for me. I call them up tell them something is defective (mother board) it shows up in 48 hours with a return label for the original for me to ship back. I admit its been a few years however
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by nospam007 ( 722110 ) *

        "i havent gotten anything from them in a while but its always been painless for me. "

        For me too. I'm living in the EU and we can return _anything_ for any reason or no reason at all, if bought online.
        It's the law.
        The return label is included and I can put it in any delivery box nearest to me and the post-office will pick it up there.

    • I agree that mail-order returns are difficult, which is why I dont buy anything mail-order if I can get it locally.

      Things like monitors, headphones, webcams, mice, keyboards, hard and thumb drives, .... all of them can be sourced locally from multiple locations, and all of those locations have even friendlier return policies than this change gives Amazon.

      On top of that, it is a fact that some retailers make sure higher quality items are on the shelves precisely because of their return policy. A busines
      • by green1 ( 322787 )

        Your local stores may have good return policies, but I'd argue that they are "friendlier" than this Amazon policy. You quite literally don't have to talk to anyone to do the return, depending on the postal situation in your neighbourhood you might not even have to put on pants.

        I'm not saying your local stores aren't doing things well, but I don't think you can claim that they are necessarily superior to this

        • What I like about buying from our local computer store is that my purchase is DOA or doesn't meet expecation, I can get a replacement right away. The only downside is that I do have to put on pants when I go there, but that's a small price to pay.
          • by green1 ( 322787 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @03:41PM (#54928171)

            You also have to go there, shop during their specified business hours, deal with their significantly smaller selection, wait in lines, transport your purchase home afterwards, etc. All told, what took 5 minutes of your time to do online, takes over an hour of your time to do at a physical store.
            Online shopping is far more convenient than brick and mortar, offers a larger selection, and generally at lower prices.

            Of course, if you're an "instant gratification" type who can't wait 2 days for shipping, then I guess you can keep shopping at the local mall until it finally goes out of business, but keep in mind that the fewer people like you who are willing to do it, the higher their prices are going to have to rise to compensate for it.

    • That is why I am thankful that I have a Micro Center near by. They may be marginally more expensive (I think I paid like $5 to $10 more the last time I built a computer) than amazon or new egg but the fact that if something is DOA I can bring it back and get a new one without any hassle is worth it. It doesn't seem to happen often but when it does stopping by on my way home from work is super easy (the back entrance is right at the top of the ramp to get on/off the freeway), or I can drive there if I need i
      • by DogDude ( 805747 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:57PM (#54927771)
        You should also be happy that you're supporting your neighbors and your community.
        • You should also be happy that you're supporting your neighbors and your community.

          Why shouldn't you be happy that you're supporting the community of wherever the Amazon shipping warehouse is? What is it about the place you live that makes it more deserving of support than somewhere else?

          The obvious answer is "because I live there", but, is that really an answer? Is this just the modern form of tribalism, or is there really some actual value in supporting people who live near you rather than people who live far away.

    • Yes, I'll pay $5 more for that motherboard

      So basically you're ok with paying $5 more per item for hassle-free returns.

      Newegg Premier [newegg.com] is just $50/yr. It gives you expedited shipping, free returns for any reason (Amazon charges you return shipping if there's nothing wrong with the item), no restocking fee, and your friends and family can use your membership as well. By your metric, if you and your friends/family could potentially buy more than 10 items per year from Newegg, this is a better deal than Am

  • GTFO (Score:2, Informative)

    by qbast ( 1265706 )
    'Outraged sellers' are welcome to get the hell out of Amazon and sell somewhere else, on their own terms.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Tablizer ( 95088 )

      Go where? Amazon nuked the competition. It's the same reason most orgs still have Microsoft desktops despite MS sucking rotting eggs forward and backward. Your poop has to be crevice-for-crevice compatible with the shape of everyone else's MS-Anus if you want to pass goods and services instead of be constipated.

      Competition is good, now lets get some.

      • ebay is still a big place to sell your products.
        • Re:GTFO (Score:4, Informative)

          by Oswald McWeany ( 2428506 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:02PM (#54927231)

          ebay is still a big place to sell your products.

          As a consumer, I, and many other people, won't touch e-bay with a 10ft pole. Jet on the otherhand, if it had better variety, like maybe even 1/3 of what Amazon has, would be an excellent place to shop.

          • Re:GTFO (Score:5, Informative)

            by green1 ( 322787 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:37PM (#54927609)

            yes, and you know why we, as consumers, won't touch e-bay? precisely because it's a haven for these exact sellers who don't care about their customers.

            If you won't stand behind your product, e-bay is the perfect place to sell, as the buyers there expect that level (or lack of) support.

            If you DO stand behind your product, than continue to sell on Amazon, this change won't affect you.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              I don't know where you guys get this shit from.

              As someone who operated a small ebay business and still sells on ebay, I can assure you that the game is always configured in the buyer's favor. It is beyond easy for buyers to get away with all sorts of return scams and arbitrary complaining.

              I have never and will never have an experience in my life where I receive something from eBay or Amazon that wasn't as expected and I am not able to reconcile it. On the contrary, my biggest fear as a seller is that a bu

              • by Khyber ( 864651 )

                "There are far more places to buy things than to sell things."

                Your logic is rather broken. The only places to buy things are the places selling things in the first place!

          • by slew ( 2918 )

            ebay is still a big place to sell your products.

            As a consumer, I, and many other people, won't touch e-bay with a 10ft pole. Jet on the otherhand, if it had better variety, like maybe even 1/3 of what Amazon has, would be an excellent place to shop.

            Don't "worry", pretty soon Jet will be just like Walmart (since they bought Jet)... They are phasing out Kirkland brands for Sam's products and are adding some Walmart to boost their variety, but I suspect the end goal is to close Jet (kind of like Amazon killed Quidsi).

          • Why the hell would I need variety? Amazon doesn't really need to be a one stop shop (and over here it certainly isn't: Amazon.nl only offers books, though they finally did get around to add Dutch language to the German Amazon store). If I need a rubber washer for the pump in my heater, I can go to rubberwashersforheaters.nl and find what I need. In fact a lot of the big online retailers have different filtered views on their stores, giving the impression that there are many stores, each selling only one t
          • As a consumer, ebay is great though? The sellers are scared shitless of getting anything other than 5-star reviews and will bend over backwards to secure a good rating.

        • Lots of people still sell things from their own website. Depending on what you're looking for, it's often better to search for sites specifically about that product, as you'll have more access to information for comparison.
      • Go where? Amazon nuked the competition.

        Nonsense. Besides eBay, anyone is free to spin up their own storefront, and handle their own advertising. If their business is small enough to where advertising is arduous they'd probably be better off working niche markets anyway.

      • Re:GTFO (Score:5, Insightful)

        by JenovaSynthesis ( 528503 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:57PM (#54927191)

        Amazon's competition nuked themselves with their inadequacy. All Amazon did was spot the weaknesses (which were pretty obvious) and exploit them.

        • Re:GTFO (Score:5, Interesting)

          by mrfaithful ( 1212510 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:12PM (#54927373)

          Amazon's competition nuked themselves with their inadequacy. All Amazon did was spot the weaknesses (which were pretty obvious) and exploit them.

          No, what Amazon did was figure out that they didn't need to make profit so long as they kept investing in new technology that they could maybe sell eventually. They now make so much money on cloud computing and related services that they don't give a crap about profit in their retail side. They are walmarting the entire retail business model safe in the knowledge that everyone else is going to go broke long before they do trying to compete.

          People who have never worked in a small retail business don't understand the business model. You don't "compete" with lower prices, that's just a race to the bottom with everyone dying a slow death. Including the manufacturers who now have a thoroughly devalued product that they can't wholesale.

      • Go where?

        Are you serious? There are a zillion alternatives. That most of them are crap isn't Amazon's fault. For starters, there is eBay. There is also plenty of niche vendors for particular products. You can also set up your own website.

        So why is it hard to sell through these other sites? Because they have a reputation for slow shipping and crappy return policies ... so it is hypocritical to want to use Amazon's reputation while complaining about their easy returns.

      • by EvilSS ( 557649 )

        Go where? Amazon nuked the competition. It's the same reason most orgs still have Microsoft desktops despite MS sucking rotting eggs forward and backward. Your poop has to be crevice-for-crevice compatible with the shape of everyone else's MS-Anus if you want to pass goods and services instead of be constipated.

        Competition is good, now lets get some.

        Walmart or eBay for starters. Yes, Walmart also has 3rd party sellers. Or Sears (also has 3rd party sellers).

    • Yes, ideally these businesses could just go elsewhere and thrive... but if we're pragmatic this is a very difficult thing to succeed at. This will decimate the amount of competition because many of them will fail on their own.

      The problem is that Amazon has more or less locked in a large market of people who don't shop around, enjoy their Prime shipping, and are afraid of putting their credit card into a random business's site.

      The idealist in me agrees with you, but I don't feel idealism is the correct appro

      • by green1 ( 322787 )

        Ideally these businesses would not "thrive" elsewhere, ideally they'd go out of business altogether.
        Keep in mind that the businesses are complaining because Amazon is mandating that they stand behind their product. If you aren't willing to stand behind what you sell, and Amazon won't do business with you because of that, I have no sympathy.

        • Re:GTFO (Score:5, Insightful)

          by DogDude ( 805747 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:54PM (#54927735)
          "Standing behind your product" is not anything like "accepting all returns for no reason". There are a large percentage of people who will return something out of stupidity, ignorance, malevolence, spite, or even just for shits and giggles.
          • by green1 ( 322787 )

            And in physical stores this has been the case for eons. They just deal with it. Sure, it sucks, but the alternative is blocking legitimate refunds and not standing behind your product. I'm happy Amazon is standing up for their customers here.

        • There are clothing stores where people returned dresses or suits after wearing them. How do you as a store owner deal with that? On the retail level it's you buy it - it's yours.

          When people try to return it you examine it. Some don't even have the decency to dry clean the clothes which smell like perfume, smoke and body odor; others don't empty their pockets (condoms, receipts). And then some of these guys start screaming that the clothes aren't returnable. Police are called. They look at the clothes an
          • by green1 ( 322787 )

            Meanwhile, ALL the major stores that are left just accept everything back. Sure it sucks, but the alternative is blocking legitimate returns. I'm glad Amazon is standing up for their customers here.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Oh, believe me, we are. Amazon is a shit show all around for 3rd party sellers. It just takes awhile to sink in.

      Upfront, you see them steal 15%-20% of every sale.

      Then your first order comes in. They've reset the weight of everything you sell. Feathers or bowling balls, doesn't matter, catalog says 1lb. Shipping is a flat $4.49 so they helpfully select a customer in the state farthest from you. As if that's not enough, then they dip their snouts into that too so you only get $4.

      Then, if you signed up f

    • Have you ever sold items online? Most customers are fine but there is small percentage that are idiots, scammers, assholes or all three rolled into one. None of these proposed changes are going to make selling items online any easier or more profitable. No, they'll just make sure some sellers decide that the scales have now tipped to the point where it's not worth the bullshit with Amazon reaching into their pockets on behalf of that small subset and making the whole enterprise unprofitable.

      And their "re

  • by JoeyRox ( 2711699 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:29PM (#54926861)
    Live by the sword, die by the sword.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Like in the Netherlands where sellers are required to take anything sold online back in 14 days no questions asked and refunds include shipping cost (to get the product to there customer, not back to the seller)

    • by bsolar ( 1176767 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:44PM (#54927025)
      The 14 days cancel and return of online purchases no question asked is mandatory in the EU.
    • Oregon, and many other US States, have the same 14 day refund period for most items. There are exclusions.

      The thing is, I'm not buying any of it in Oregon. I don't know if when you buy from Amazon, where you legally make the purchase. But when I buy, I'm buying stuff from Washington State, where Amazon is.

      Generally, to get local protections you have to buy it from a local retailer. When people talk about Amazon being bad for local retailers, now you know one of the reasons why that matters to some people.

      • IANAL, but it seems to me that if they have a presence in your state, then it ought to be treated as a local purchase. That's how collecting sales taxes works.

        • Right, but the actual word is "nexus," and "presence" is just how the media describes it. It means having stores or major offices in most cases.

          Also, the rules isn't that you have to collect taxes for sales in a State if you have a nexus there. It is actually at the other end; the State is not allowed to demand that you collect the tax unless you have a nexus there. If there is a requirement, it is up to local State law to say so. Not all States bother, and they don't have the same rules for what is a "nexu

  • by Balial ( 39889 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:38PM (#54926981) Homepage

    Imagine the tragedy of a world where a seller is liable for making the products they sell actually useful out of the box rather than forcing customers to go down a "support" rabbit hole before they give up.

    • by DogDude ( 805747 )
      "Making a seller liable" is not anything like "Making the seller accept any and all returns".
    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      Imagine the tragedy of a world where a seller is liable for making the products they sell actually useful out of the box rather than forcing customers to go down a "support" rabbit hole before they give up.

      The seller is a middle-man. Generally they are neither the manufacturer, nor trained in how to support the products they sell. They also do not necessarily have the expertise to evaluate every product before deciding to sell it to see if it is going to be "easy enough" for the customer to make them happy. The ones that do will have to recoup that cost in some way, normally through a after-sale paid support service or higher initial prices.

      People need to stop being babies and make up their minds what they wa

    • by Pascoea ( 968200 )

      making the products they sell actually useful out of the box

      Have you ever actually worked with the public before? People are idiots. I've worked in a retail environment for a number of years, and a consumer electronics repair shop for a couple years. The level of stupidity achieved by the general population would make your head spin. When I sold and serviced remote car starters it would be at least a weekly experience explaining to a customer that there was a battery in the remote that needed to be replaced. Not to mention the call where we had to instruct the c

  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:44PM (#54927033)
    ... now that Amazon is huge, the small merchants are no longer needed.
  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna ( 970587 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:46PM (#54927049) Journal

    It's no secret that Jeff Bezos' first, second and third objectives are to please Amazon customers, giving them more stuff at the lowest prices and at faster speeds. But increasingly, those upgrades come at the expense of sellers, who often build their businesses on Amazon and have few other places to generate revenue.

    The sellers put all their eggs in one basket. Now they are paying the price. Amazon customers too must remember this. Once the brick and mortar competition is driven to bankruptcy it will be their turn to pay the piper.

  • If returns are at the seller's expense, then I would expect the seller to charge more for any products that they determine is more likely to be returned so that the extra profit on the unreturned products can subsidized the expense the seller must bear for returned products. This might make it less likely that they move the product in the first place, but there's a fine line that the seller is going to have to try and balance, and if they cannot sell an item profitably because of the number of returns, then they are reasonably left with no choice but to discontinue that product (which is actually in the best interests of the customer as well, since it does not waste the customer's time with products they are going to have to return)
  • by DeplorableCodeMonkey ( 4828467 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:53PM (#54927151)

    eBay, Amazon Marketplace, etc. have more in common with a flea market than a big box retailer. This shows a wildly idiotic misunderstanding of what they really are:

    If a consumer is returning an electronic device because it's difficult to use

    I am with the sellers here. Totally inappropriate to go the marketplace route (which is often cheaper) and expect the benefits of paying more from Amazon.

    • I doubt your average shopper knows who they are buying from. Unless you pay attention to the "ships from and sold by" text, it can often look like just another purchase - you don't need to be clicking on the "other sellers" text to be buying from the marketplace.

      Indeed Amazon will even target customers with email ads for products that are exclusively sold by third party merchants. So you get an email from Amazon advertising a product, you click the link in the email and make a purchase on Amazon.com - it's

    • Exactly.

      A hard drive manufacturer notices that the last 50000 drives coming off the line are having issues... either via their QC or from feedback from merchants... well then now thats a batch headed exclusively to the retailers that negotiated the lowest wholesale prices.

      A retailer like Walmart doesnt care that the item is of lower quality than is typical because people returning items is part of their business model of getting people back into the store to buy more stuff. Think about it... if you are
    • by Junta ( 36770 )

      Of course, if you explicitly make the effort to look, you notice it's marketplace. People who aren't paying close attention end up not seeing the difference (well, until shipping comes up).

  • by phorm ( 591458 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:56PM (#54927179) Journal

    This seems to be a big issue with overseas sellers - I point to China because they're the most common - and shipping. My $5-20 item may come with free shipping, but when it arrives and is broken or turns out to be a fake piece of crap, the return cost may end up being more than the value of the item (especially if I want it tracked and within a reasonable time period).

    • by Kjella ( 173770 )

      This seems to be a big issue with overseas sellers - I point to China because they're the most common - and shipping. My $5-20 item may come with free shipping, but when it arrives and is broken or turns out to be a fake piece of crap, the return cost may end up being more than the value of the item (especially if I want it tracked and within a reasonable time period).

      If it's bought and shipped across the world for $5 my expectations are very low, like a cheap piece of plastic knock-off and not a solid or brand anything. Either the seller will send me another if it's clearly defective or I'll give a bad review and write it off. I only buy from sellers with high 99.x% rating so they care about that, the reminder I expect is mainly the factory/shipping fail rate. For the savings I just figure a few bum deals are worth it and the ratings seem to get crap products off the ma

    • by sl149q ( 1537343 )

      I ordered a $3 vga cable. It simply didn't work as advertised. Asked for refund and they wanted it shipped back with tracking number at my expense. Which would have been (from Canada) about six times the expected refund.

      My review of the product went into great detail on why I was giving it one star.

  • It will crush them (Score:5, Informative)

    by DogDude ( 805747 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:01PM (#54927221)
    Amazon is already taking 30% of the sales price PLUS 30% OF SHIPPING. There are very few things that can be sold for enough of a margin to make a profit with costs like that. Unlimited returns will remove any remaining profit from most merchants selling through Amazon.

    But hey, who needs profit, right? Just keep selling things below cost, and eventually, you'll make a profit, right?
    • by dabadab ( 126782 )

      Amazon is already taking 30% of the sales price PLUS 30% OF SHIPPING.

      Taking the same percentage of the shipping is standard business practice, eBay also does it and import duty works the same way too - else everybody would sell everything for $1 and charge the rest as "shipping fee".

  • by shambalagoon ( 714768 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @02:49PM (#54927695) Homepage

    This sounds great to me as a buyer. But consider:

    1) Company A buys tons of products from a competitor
    2) Company A returns them all at competitor's expense
    3) Bye-bye competitor

  • Could somebody please explain to me how this is not equivalent to Amazon enabling theft?
  • They should have to reach out for customer support first before allowing a blind refund. Customers are stupid and don't read directions, which shouldn't be the fault of the seller, it should be the fault of the customer. This is a major negative score.
  • That is Amazon Approved! Just buy all your competitors products, and then return them all... Should Zero out all their operating capitol, no problem! Not to mention, this behavior is now SANCTIONED by Amazon! But no, this won't be abused by anyone... LoL

Little known fact about Middle Earth: The Hobbits had a very sophisticated computer network! It was a Tolkien Ring...

Working...