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Firefox 57 Will Hide Search Bar and Use a Uni-Bar Approach, Like Chrome (bleepingcomputer.com) 315

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bleeping Computer: Mozilla will drop an iconic section of its UI -- the search bar -- and will use one singular input bar atop the browser, similar to the approach of most Chromium browsers. This change will go live in Firefox 57, scheduled for release on November 14, and will be part of Photon -- the codename used to describe Firefox's new user interface (UI) -- also scheduled for a public release in v57. Mozilla engineers aren't removing the search bar altogether, but Firefox will hide this UI element by default. Users can still re-enable it by going to "Preferences -> Search -> Search Bar" and choosing the second option. The current Firefox search bar is redundant since most of its features can be performed by the URL address bar.
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Firefox 57 Will Hide Search Bar and Use a Uni-Bar Approach, Like Chrome

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  • End of Firefox (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Unless Firefox 57 does something better than Chrome why use Firefox?

    • by Hognoxious ( 631665 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:10AM (#55164085) Homepage Journal

      It should be renamed. How about Firefaux, or maybe Chlone?

      • Still not as good as Le Edge.
      • Re:End of Firefox (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Blue Stone ( 582566 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @04:18PM (#55166153) Homepage Journal

        Transcript of the last brainstorming meeting at Firefox HQ:

        "Hey you guys, have you noticed how everyone's stopped using Firefox and started using Chrome?

        Maybe if we make our browser exactly the same as Chrome some people might use it?

        What's that? You think that would provide even less of an incentive to use Firefox?

        Ha! Good one! Carry on everyone!"

        Running Firefox into the ground. What a fucking shame.

        • "Hey, why don't we break all the popular FF add-ons in the process?" "Yeah, great idea."
        • Maybe if we make our browser exactly the same as Chrome some people might use it?

          Well I suppose we might get a few percent of existing Chrome users.

          More than we have now, then?

    • Re:End of Firefox (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:21AM (#55164117)

      What is it with Mozilla ?
      They keep pissing around with Firefox, removing and changing stuff people use and like about the browser, whilst continually wasting resources adding "features" nobody wants (Pocket, Hello etc).
      And all the time this is going on Firefox market share keeps falling, yet those in charge at Mozilla fail to see the correlation.

      It's almost as if Mozilla hold meetings where they ask "How can we alienate our userbase even more with the next release?"

      • Re:End of Firefox (Score:4, Insightful)

        by coastwalker ( 307620 ) <acoastwalker@h[ ]ail.com ['otm' in gap]> on Saturday September 09, 2017 @10:17AM (#55164373) Homepage

        If they think I am going to use a search field which might take me to a random website instead of searching for a URL or IP address they can Fcuk off. Morons. They can also give me back 8 add-ons that they are about to disable. Maybe I should give Chrome a whirl seeing as it is supposed to render so much faster and I won't have any special reason to use Firefox any longer? What is it with cretinous designers who introduce new stuff (good) whilst removing all the good stuff that I already use (bad)?

        • Re:End of Firefox (Score:4, Informative)

          by jenningsthecat ( 1525947 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @10:55AM (#55164549)

          Maybe I should give Chrome a whirl seeing as it is supposed to render so much faster and I won't have any special reason to use Firefox any longer?

          Maybe you should give Pale Moon a whirl, and re-live the experience of Firefox from the days when the UI was sensible and most of your add-ons still worked. It probably won't render as fast as Chrome, but hey, at least your FF add-ons will still work, and you won't be fully embracing the evil that is Google.

          • by Z00L00K ( 682162 )

            Pale Moon isn't Gecko-based, it uses Goanna, a different layout engine. Just read on the home page for Pale Moon: http://www.palemoon.org/ [palemoon.org]

          • I dropped Pale Moon recently after something like 2 years of use. The problem is stuff just stops working. Its often not even really browsers fault, but simply no website developers care about it at all. I have 2 sites that I visit semi regularly that straight blocked it (slack and my local electricity provider) and many sites have some minor (or even major if they use some more obscure functionalities) glitches. The straw that broke the camels back for me was user script that I needed and that simply refus

            • by Luckyo ( 1726890 )

              This plus the add-on extinction event they had when they decided to just randomly drop jetpack add-on support "because our new engine just doesn't support them any more".

        • by Joce640k ( 829181 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @11:05AM (#55164611) Homepage

          Yep, the autocomplete for searches should be completely separate from the autocomplete for URLs.

          Anybody who thinks differently is an idiot.

          • Not an idiot, just misguided. They folks have some sort of delusion of a unified web experience, but I don't quite get what they're driving at.
          • Agree. Somebody mod parent up. Speaking with me using the search field autocomplete for a tiny handy calculator
          • Yep, the autocomplete for searches should be completely separate from the autocomplete for URLs.

            Anybody who thinks differently is an idiot.

            I have actually *never* used the Search Bar and have disabled searching from the URL Bar (I refuse to call it the Awesome Bar, 'cause it's not). When I want to search, I navigate to the home page of the search engine I want to use and search there. I also have disabled search suggestions in Google as that creeps me out. Perhaps a bit old-fashion and/or Luddite of me, but it gives me more control rather than whatever *else* the Search Bar does under the covers.

        • There are also some additional technical issues with combining these. I normally just search for things in the URL bar, but occasionally have found that I get directed to a non-existent website when I actually wanted to search for a specific term.

          This is the problem with overloading your input field like this. You have to make a "best guess" as to your user's intention, and if you screw up, you force the user to go search from a website.

          Want to know how easy it is to fool the "Awesome Bar"? Type "string.

      • Re:End of Firefox (Score:4, Interesting)

        by greenfruitsalad ( 2008354 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @10:24AM (#55164399)

        if they really crave a UI change, they should integrate "Tree Style Tab" functionality into firefox.

        i only have 3 remaining reasons for using firefox:
        * tree style tab extension (not gonna work in new version; all replacements are a joke compared to this extension)
        * privacy (the amount of addons to help me with this and the mindset of mozilla foundation are unmatched elsewhere. mozilla have repeatedly demonstrated they care about privacy and openness of the interwebs. i simply don't trust chrome/chromium)
        * being able to disable search in the address bar (so that i can type git/plex/etc.. and go to a server on my LAN)

        ALL 3 of these reasons will have gone when current firefox ESR loses support next year. f**k them.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 09, 2017 @10:35AM (#55164453)

          * privacy (the amount of addons to help me with this and the mindset of mozilla foundation are unmatched elsewhere. mozilla have repeatedly demonstrated they care about privacy and openness of the interwebs. i simply don't trust chrome/chromium)

          Have you ever actually looked at Firefox's privacy policy?!

          Anybody who claims that Firefox protects their privacy probably hasn't actually looked at Firefox's privacy policy [mozilla.org].

          Below are some excerpts from the Firefox privacy policy that is dated July 31, 2017.

          Be sure to notice the type of information being collected and possibly even transmitted to third parties (including Google, some "Leanplum" company, a "mobile analytics vendor", and "certain developers"). We see terms like:

          • - "IP address"
          • - "browser version"
          • - "operating system"
          • - "locale"
          • - "language preference"
          • - "list of add-ons you have installed"
          • - "phone number"
          • - "email address"
          • - "URLs associated with the downloaded file"
          • - "hardware configuration"
          • - "commonly visited domains"
          • - "location"
          • - "the active URL"
          • - "Google advertising ID"
          • - "personal information"
          • - "key word searches"
          • - "Wi-Fi networks"
          • - "cell phone towers"

          Here are the excerpts:

          Once per day, Firefox sends the following info to Mozilla when it checks for browser updates: your Firefox version information, language preference, operating system, and version.

          Firefox contacts Mozilla once per day to check for add-on information to check for malicious add-ons. This includes, for example: browser version, OS and version, locale, total number of requests, time of last request, time of day, IP address, and the list of add-ons you have installed.

          About once per day, Firefox connects to Mozilla and provides you with new snippets, if available. Mozilla may collect how often snippets are clicked, snippet name, browser locale, and which version of Firefox you're using.

          Firefox sends Mozilla a monthly request to look up your location at a country level using your IP address.

          Some Mozilla sponsored snippets are interactive and allow you to optionally share your phone number or email address.

          This data includes, for example: device hardware, operating system, Firefox version, add-ons (count and type), timing of browser events, rendering, session restores, length of session, interaction with search access points and use of Firefox search partner codes, how old a profile is, basic information about errors and crashes, and count of pages.

          Firefox sends to this third-party information identifying the site's certificate.

          About twice per hour, Firefox downloads Google's SafeBrowsing lists to help block access to sites and downloads that are malicious or forged (Google's privacy policy is at https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/).

          Firefox may send metadata, including URLs associated with the downloaded file, to the SafeBrowsing service.

          Usage statistics or "Telemetry" is a feature in Firefox that sends Mozilla usage, performance, and responsiveness statistics about user interface features, memory, and hardware configuration. Your IP address is also collected as a part of a standard web log.

          Firefox sends to Mozilla data relating to the tiles such as number of clicks, impressions, your IP address, locale information, and tile specific data (e.g., position and size of grid).

          In Firefox Beta, certain short-term Telemetry experiments (see above) for Tiles may collect information about commonly visited domains.

          Firefox sends Mozilla a request once to look up your location at a country level using your IP address.

          Firefox may send the terms you type in the Awesome Bar or Search Bar to your Default Search Engine to retrieve suggestions, and is governed by the applicable Privacy Policy from your Default Search Engine.

          To help us understand and improve our marketing campaigns, Firefox sends certain information by default. This includes “Referral Data” such as the website domain or advertising campaign that referred you to download and install Firefox, as well as “Interaction Data” about what features you use in Firefox.

          On Android and iOS, Firefox sends Referral Data to our mobile analytics vendor, and also includes a Google advertising ID, IP address, timestamp, country, locale, operating system, and app version.

          On desktop, Firefox records and sends Referral Data to Mozilla as part of Firefox Health Report.

          On iOS, Firefox sends Interaction Data to Leanplum, our mobile marketing vendor, which has its own privacy policy.

          When you ask it to, Firefox also connects to Mozilla to provide you with features such as Sync, location services, crash reporting, and add-ons.

          Firefox may use several pieces of data to determine your location, including your operating systems geolocation features, Wi-Fi networks, cell phone towers, or IP address.

          Estimating your location involves sending some of this information to Google's geolocation service, which has its own privacy policy.

          This includes technical information such as why Firefox crashed, the active URL and the state of Firefox's memory usage at the time of the crash, which may include personal information.

          To display the personalized recommendations, Firefox sends information to Mozilla, including the list of add-ons you have installed, Firefox version information, and your IP address.

          Mozilla collects these key word searches, as well as your Firefox version information, locale, and OS to show you recommendations.

          Firefox sends information to Mozilla about what sites you have agreed to receive Push Notification from.

          Mozilla may share aggregated information with certain developers including the number of visitors to their site that have subscribed or unsubscribed to their Push Notifications.

          We receive data such as the average size and number of your uploaded screenshots, your Firefox browser version, device operating system, and errors. The IP address accessing the Firefox Screenshots website is temporarily collected as part of a standard server log.

          Some people will try to justify this nonsense by saying, "It's ok, they disclose what they're collecting and sharing!" or the even more idiotic, "It's ok, you can disable some of this data collection and sharing!".

          None of that matters!

          If you're using Firefox because you think it gives you "privacy", well, you really ought to reconsider why you're using it.

          As its very own privacy policy indicates, Firefox collects a lot of information and readily shares it with Mozilla and others.

        • tree style tab extension

          Tree Style Tab will work with Firefox 57 [github.com].

          privacy

          NoScript [mozilla.org], Ghostery [mozilla.org], uBlock Origin [mozilla.org], etc. work with Firefox 57. So don't worry, be happy [youtube.com].

          • Starting with firefox 56, "tree style tab" is so buggy it is almost unusable. There is no WebExtenions-based replacement that would even approach its functionality. The version 2.0 for firefox57+ will NOT have the features people are used to. e.g.: like in chrome with similar extensions, there will be 2 tab bars (the native horizontal one + crappy always-broken javascripty injected vertical one); no context menus on tabs, etc..

            • there will be 2 tab bars (the native horizontal one + crappy always-broken javascripty injected vertical one); no context menus on tabs

              Both hiding the native tab strip and context menus are being worked [github.com] on for Tree Style Tab. Your fears are unfounded.

      • I often ponder whether tthe end goal is to get to a point where they can drop in the Chromium engine so they could cut those development costs and that the decision was made a while ago as market-share was plummeting. Then this would all make sense...otherwise it makes no sense. Vivaldi has a search bar for crying out loud.
      • Maybe they should run for political office.

  • by fisted ( 2295862 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:06AM (#55164073)

    Chrome.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:10AM (#55164083)

    ... but we polished that sieve to a nice chrome finish.

    • If I mean to paste a URL into the URL bar but paste some text by mistake, that gets leaked to whatever my default search provider is. I've never been a fan of this approach.
      • What's annoying is that firefox had "quick bookmarks" over a decade ago, and that functionality is just fine for implementing searching from the URL bar. Just throw in some pre-setup keywords and everything is good.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:15AM (#55164103)

    Stop removing features and start fixing the bugs and improving performance, Mozilla. You might still have a chance against Google if you kicked out your UX team and just started doing some basic engineering. The browser is not meant to be any playground where UI elements are moved and changed around. Browser should be an application which stays off the way and just shows the web pages efficiently. But of course according to UX people, eg. the search bar is a distracting element which is way too hard for their stupid users to understand so it must be removed. Surprisingly the Pocket, reader mode and other useless buttons are there to stay just in case somebody clicks them by mistake.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      UX people are cancer. They are to engineers what interior decorators are to architects.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by thegarbz ( 1787294 )

      Stop removing features and start fixing the bugs and improving performance

      Funny that's exactly what they are doing. Part of the reason of switching to webextensions is to get a massive performance boost while at the same time limiting the damage that plugins cause such as lockups and memory leaks.

      Browser should be an application which stays off the way and just shows the web pages efficiently.

      Disagree. A browser should be a window manager, a download manager, a bookmark manager, a privacy manager and have a usable UI while achieving all of the above.

      • Stop removing features and start fixing the bugs and improving performance

        Funny that's exactly what they are doing. Part of the reason of switching to webextensions is to get a massive performance boost while at the same time limiting the damage that plugins cause such as lockups and memory leaks.

        True only if "webextension" keep enough functions of old firefox extensions capabilities. Remove features so that a program can be fast? Anyone who want a Chrome-like experience can use and have used Chrome. Firefox will always lose in long term the "performance game", as Google Chrome have more money and manpower behind.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Sigh. According to TFA, you can still have your search bar if you want it. There is an option to have a unified bar or two separate bars.

      But the bigger issue here is that maybe a unified bar is better. Most browsers have adopted this UI, and from a usability point of view it does seem to be better. URL detection is pretty reliable, it saves space, it makes it easier to find stuff because the search results include your browsing history and URL entry history without sending any of that information to a 3rd p

      • But the bigger issue here is that maybe a unified bar is better. Most browsers have adopted this UI, and from a usability point of view it does seem to be better. URL detection is pretty reliable, it saves space, it makes it easier to find stuff because the search results include your browsing history and URL entry history without sending any of that information to a 3rd party... It's what most people want.

        I'm not sure all of that is true. In my experience (alert, alert, anecdote ahead!), URL detection is hopelessly bad, by default sending LAN IP addresses and hostnames to your favourite search engine or even going to an Internet site with the same 2nd level domain name as an internal server unless you preface it with http:/// [http] first. In UI terms, the consolidation hardly saves space, since the URL bar just ends up taking the same space as the search box would have taken anyway; and if you think the browser is

      • Sigh. According to TFA, you can still have your search bar if you want it. There is an option to have a unified bar or two separate bars.

        This is what Mozilla always do! They take a feature and change it to 'off by default but optional', and then remove the option to enable it and later declare it the sole purview of mods. And then make the mods obsolete and non-functional.

        How many times now have they done this now?

      • by Luckyo ( 1726890 )

        The key reason for this is unification with phone browsers. "Everything should look the same across devices".

        Obvious problem being that this means that everyone gets the lowest common denominator across all devices and loses as a result.

        • "Everything should look the same across devices"

          Who the blaze wants that? My phone is a single small portrait screen. My PC has dual landscape mode monitors. If you try to make it look the same, one of them is going to have serious letterboxing.

      • by SEE ( 7681 )

        But the bigger issue here is that maybe a unified bar is better.

        Yeah, lots of people were saying that back when Firefox 1.0 was released, and the unified address/search input area that was in Mozilla 1.7 and all other major browsers of that era went away in favor of the separate boxes paradigm, too.

        Of course, back then, the Mozilla organization was telling the people that favored the unified approach that they were wrong, that two separate boxes was superior for usability. Now Mozilla is reversing itself.

    • by Solandri ( 704621 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @11:50AM (#55164853)

      The browser is not meant to be any playground where UI elements are moved and changed around.

      On the contrary, the only reason I still use Firefox part of the time is because way back around version 2 or 3 (back when it had the configurable drag and drop UI), I took some time to configure it to my liking. When I upgraded computers, I used Firefox's built-in backup utility to backup bookmarks but didn't uncheck any options. That's when I accidentally discovered that it also backed up my UI configuration as well.

      For about a decade now, I've been restoring this backup and it's been mostly successful at undoing many of the pointless UI changes Mozilla has been making to turn FF into a clone of Chrome. Being able to remove or change around UI elements is exactly what browsers need - so long as it's the user who is in control of these changes. Not some faceless designer who decides which changes to make and forces it onto all users.

  • that so fucking annoying and it's not like our PC monitors are getting smaller and screen real estate are at a premium.

    • by Misagon ( 1135 )

      Not everyone maximises their browser windows. The extended screen real estate can be put to better use.

      I am used to running two windows side by side on 1920 wide screens, and three windows on 34" 21:9, same PPI.
      One window per task, thus having tabs sorted by task and not in one clump.

  • by Cthefuture ( 665326 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:31AM (#55164149)

    Just give us a browser that doesn't spy on us and is stable. This was the Firefox mantra 14 years ago and before that they cared about user control.

    What the actual fuck has happened to software?! These last few decades have shown that they don't care about performance, privacy, or anything but the bottom line for their own profits. Fuck that! And fuck you too!

  • by bigal123 ( 709270 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:34AM (#55164157)

    I keep hearing about things Mozilla is doing that is upsetting much of is key Firefox User base (I was an early early adopter and back then a friend of the "tree"). At one point Mozilla was an open company that listened and talked to its key users. Now they can say they are open source all they want, but that does not mean they are open to other ideas. Not even sure they are even open to the ides that made them popular.

    As a long time Firefox user I want key Mozilla staff to come out and truly explain their logic and clearly answer some of the very logical and specific concerns that have been brought up. Mozilla staff (not marking) need to step up and listen and reconsider some steps. I know the search bard can be turned back on, but all in all just seems like will be getting a Chrome by Mozilla instead of Firefox by Knowledgeable Users.

    Some people won't ever go out of their way to use different web browser. They will use Internet Explorer, Edge, Safari, or whatever was on the desktop at the beginning. So the fight is really to get the people that actually make choices and have some knowledge about choices.

    • by jopsen ( 885607 )
      Take a look at some of the under the hood things that have been going on: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Quant... [mozilla.org]

      UI and extension changes are hard to make because they'll always upset someone, notice how long it's taken Mozilla to finally get rid of old extension APIs that was blocking development.
  • by Behrooz Amoozad ( 2831361 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:35AM (#55164161)
    This is it. With every shitty update I kept using firefox because 'FOSS'. Fuck 'FOSS' if it wants to be worse than internet explorer.
    I want functionality because I'm not a 90 year old grandma; I stayed with firefox because it used to respect my intelligence; it's not doing that any more.
    • by xvan ( 2935999 )
      Chromium is FOSS, the only ethical argument for Firefox it (still, kinda), maintains the market respecting standards.
  • by ChrisMaple ( 607946 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:38AM (#55164179)
    Firefox is heading toward a single gesture user interface
    A raised middle finger.
  • No, it isn't (Score:5, Insightful)

    by squiggleslash ( 241428 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @09:51AM (#55164229) Homepage Journal

    The current Firefox search bar is redundant since most of its features can be performed by the URL address bar.

    No, it's not redundant. The search bar/URL address bar split permits some level of privacy as what's entered on the URL bar isn't sent to a search engine, and what's placed in the search bar is, in real time.

    That's a significant difference, significant enough that it absolutely should be removed from the Slashdot summary, because the summary re-enforces the idea that getting rid of it is OK because "they're the same" when they're not.

    Mozilla just has to fuck up tabs now and I'll switch to Chrome. I cannot believe the level of contempt these idiots have for their own users - if you're trying to compete with another browser, you don't build a clone of it, especially when that means ditching every feature that makes your browser better, because the only time you can compete when building clones of rival products is on price, and Chrome is already free.

    In practice, making Firefox a clone of Chrome is giving users of Firefox the middle finger, not extending an invite to those who prefer Chrome already.

    • Re:No, it isn't (Score:4, Interesting)

      by SIGBUS ( 8236 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @10:01AM (#55164291) Homepage

      No, it's not redundant. The search bar/URL address bar split permits some level of privacy as what's entered on the URL bar isn't sent to a search engine, and what's placed in the search bar is, in real time.

      And that is precisely why I've stuck with Firefox and limited my use of Chrome to things specific to my Google account. When I type in a URL on my own LAN, I really *don't* to be feeding that URL into a search engine - doubly so if it's something I've made IPv6-accessible so I can bring it up on my cell phone. (Firefox on Android has a single bar for space reasons, but it at least doesn't do a search until you tell it to.)

      On the desktop, if they make it NOT do a search without asking, I'd be a lot less hostile to this, but there's so much "because fuck you, that's why" on the net these days that I'm not optimistic.

    • No, it's not redundant. The search bar/URL address bar split permits some level of privacy as what's entered on the URL bar isn't sent to a search engine, and what's placed in the search bar is, in real time.

      You can make it so (at least up to v55, not sure about v57). The way I've been using FF for years is: hide the search bar, disable search and suggestions in the URL bar, and then use keyword search to search from the URL bar (g for google, w for wikipedia, and so on).

      As a FF user since v0.3 Phoenix, I'm willing to give v57 a fair try, but Mozilla is treading on very thin ice lately...

    • The search bar/URL address bar split permits some level of privacy as what's entered on the URL bar isn't sent to a search engine, and what's placed in the search bar is, in real time.

      Unless you've looked at the code, you don't know that. They may both be entry fields to the same subroutine, just with different options.

  • I hope they will also fix search from that bar, then. Once upon a time, typing stuff into that bar did a search with your default search engine. Later, I believe sometime well after they implemented the separate search field, the address bar searches started to use the currently selected engine (in the search field) instead of your default. This is completely, absolutely, and in all other ways idiotic, and only a complete numbfuck could have thought it up. If I wanted to search with my currently selected se

  • If we wanted to use something like Chrome, we would use Chrome. This desire to copy Chrome is going to kill Firefox.
    • Yes, the marketshare bleed of the last decade has shown this over and over again. Make it Chrome and the dedicated user base - who is all that is left - will have no reason to stay. This really bums me out...been here since Netscape.

      Vivaldi has a search bar, works very well now and has designers that want to be different from Chrome: https://vivaldi.com/ [vivaldi.com]

      If we just want Chrome without the Google we can go here and get that: http://chromium.woolyss.com/ [woolyss.com]
  • My preference would be for FF devs to focus on increasing speed, stability and standards compliance instead of adding new features, unless the community indicates they really want a particular feature (or, possibly, if a given feature is trivially easy to implement).

    I mostly want my browser to not crash, to render pages and perform DOM-manipulation correctly, and to do everything as quickly as possible.
  • On its face this isn't much, but taken in context of the last decade it seems like another step into the grave. Seems astounding, but the guys at the top of Mozilla making the design direction / decisions just seem to want to duplicate Chrome. Yeah, good idea...Once you do that, why use Firefox (to the normal uninformed user)? And you keep driving off your user base (like has been happening the last decade?). Duplicating Chrome in structure and UI, is not a good path.

    I wish the guys in charge of Vi
  • Mozilla, you are losing ground so you decided to lure users by providing equal or less features than the competitors?
    • So true, they won't get new or keep users because of this.

      Look at the UI change on the linked page with those hard square tabs (and non metal frontage), it looks really awful and that was on a Mac....just like Vivaldi's (which I like otherwise) engine generated square UI, well except it won't have a separate search bar. (giving me more of a reason to use Vivaldi) That's even worse, loosing their look....could this just be a path to use the Chromium engine for costs?
  • At least the search in address bar is configurable. Personally I prefer Chrome's approach but I think that Firefox should make the old separate search bar be the default.

    If Firefox wants to position itself as an alternative to Chrome, it should try to be an alternative to Chrome and that means that it would have to be different, it has to be its own thing.
    Otherwise Chrome Users will just see it as a copy - an inferior copy - to Chrome and they will go back to the "real thing".

    Google chose to unify the searc

  • Something Something Bad

    Mozilla: do what you can to arrest your declining market share! Hint: it's not continued attempts at emulating Chrome.
  • I can kind of sympathize with the removal of the status bar and menu bar, but only for people stuck on rubbish 1280x720 and 1366x768 screens... Horizontal screen real estate is not what's at a premium here, seriously. Why not just sell it off to Google at this point, so they can gut it and finish butchering it?
  • by C0L0PH0N ( 613595 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @10:58AM (#55164571)
    Chrome will n-e-v-e-r support an in-browser FTP capability. So I am with Firefox forever, as long as it supports such features as FireFTP! I maintain websites, and it is such an incredibly easy tool to use, no extra steps, just two clicks and I'm connected via ftp to any of my websites. I use Chrome sometimes, but Firefox is my BFF because of FireFTP!
  • Good thing I gave up on both of them long ago.
  • I am a Firefox beta user who was selected to participate in the trial of the uni-bar and I actually like it. I did not expect to, though. I had always hated that about Chrome (one of the reasons I don't use Chrome), but it works pretty well. I like being able to search my URL history, my search history, etc, all right there from one spot. It puts the "autosuggest" completions from your default search engine in the "right" spot -- not too high and not too low.

    Overall, though I am usually a "get off my lawn"

  • not Firefox. Failing that, Chromium or even Chrome itself.

    Actually, I do have Ice Dragon installed. Mostly as a backup for the - hopefully nonexistent - day PaleMoon dies. I've found Firefox unusable for both technical and UI reasons for years.

    Thanks for the reminder to donate to PaleMoon!

  • by ShamblerBishop ( 4960723 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @12:19PM (#55165019)
    Going back months, I've made several attempts to get Firefox devs to put together some stats they gathered through telemetry, to tell me how many Firefox users out of the total, are running plugins that will become unusable once FF 57 is released. They will fob you off with every manageresque excuse possible, to avoid giving out this one single stat - in a way which displays clear contempt for the request, and for the general userbase of Firefox. The public need to directly engage through official Firefox communication channels, and make themselves heard, in large numbers - and demand (extremely loudly) proper public engagement and transparency - and for an actual primary voice/influence, on the future direction of Firefox (not just a secondary/tertiary "we'll consider what you say (but ignore you completely)" voice).
  • by RightwingNutjob ( 1302813 ) on Saturday September 09, 2017 @12:20PM (#55165023)
    The corporate LAN I have at work has an internal DNS where every internal site is a single word like 'hr' or 'training' or 'whatever.' The URL keywords feature has to be turned off so that when I type 'hr' to get to the HR page, it doesn't search for 'hr' on the open internet or try to go to 'www.hr.com.' Didn't think this one through, did they?
  • "...since most of its features can be performed by the URL address bar."

    Does that include the feature of being able to quickly go in and rip out Yahoo (default) and Bing as search providers? Otherwise they're just making this necessary first step an even bigger PITA than it already is.

    You know, maybe if Firefox wants to gain its users back it should stop alienating them by giving them a royal "fuck you" as it continues its downhill spiral to be as shitty as Chrome is. If I wanted to use something that loo

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