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Verizon Will Fix Broadband Networks, Landlines To Resolve Investigation (vice.com) 74

Joel Hruska reports via ExtremeTech: Verizon has reached an agreement with the Communications Workers of America and the New York State Public Service Commission to begin repairing infrastructure and restoring service across New York State. The agreement requires Verizon to extend broadband service to tens of thousands of New York State households and to begin repairing facilities it has previously neglected. As in Pennsylvania, Verizon has been neglecting its fixed wired infrastructure in its bid to first sabotage copper service, then force customers to adopt alternative solutions. It's also been mired in an ongoing lawsuit with the state of New York over its breach of a 2008 contract requiring it to provide fiber service within New York City.

This new agreement appears to settle these issues, provided it's followed. Under its terms, Verizon will extend fiber to 10,000 to 12,000 households not currently served by it in Long Island and Verizon's "Upstate Reporting Region" (these are Verizon-specific regions, not geographical areas, so "Long Island" may mean more than just the island). It will begin immediately replacing copper lines in certain specific NYC buildings with high failure rates and transitioning them to fiber optic cable, repairing operations within 50 upstate wireless centers with high failure rates, allow plant technicians to report plant failures and maintenance needs more accurately, and begin inspecting and replacing the batteries that provide critical connectivity in the event of a power outage when said batteries are deployed for specific customers (hospitals, police stations, and other emergency facilities). It will also begin removing so-called "double poles." A double pole is when an old telephone pole is stapled (metaphorically speaking) to a newer one. Some examples of a double pole from PA are shown below; Verizon has been hauled into court to force it to do its job in more than one state.

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Verizon Will Fix Broadband Networks, Landlines To Resolve Investigation

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  • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Thursday March 15, 2018 @09:23PM (#56267337)

    You know it's bad when "Company begrudgingly agrees to hold up it's end of the deal" becomes a "good" headline.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 15, 2018 @09:29PM (#56267353)

    As in Pennsylvania, Verizon has been neglecting its fixed wired infrastructure in its bid to first sabotage copper service, then force customers to adopt alternative solutions. It's also been mired in an ongoing lawsuit with the state of New York over its breach of a 2008 contract requiring it to provide fiber service within New York City.

    And this is why all of the people telling us the market will find a solution are utterly full of shit.

    The free-market is always going to be filled with players who will do anything to get an advantage. They'll outright lie to you or manipulate the game to their advantage.

    The only thing the "free market" optimizes for is greedy assholes.

    The market is completely incapable of solving or fixing this issue, because a bunch of selfish companies will never arrive at a solution which works.

    The reality is, we don't have competing water, sewage, and electricity. We don't have competing roads, fire hydrants, fire services, or police forces. This shit is infrastructure, and built to serve and benefit everyone.

    It's about fucking time we recognized that if telcos want to compete for our business (instead of telling us what we can have as a monopoly) that the cabling which comes to our homes must be common and universal.

    Then let's see what they fucking do.

    These greedy cocksuckers have already collected huge amounts of money which had been required to be earmarked to expand and maintain this infrastructure. The problem is they kept it for profits and failed to invest in their network so they could move on to the next thing they could oversell and under-deliver on.

    That they're trying to let it rot and go away to push us to more modern and profitable stuff is unsurprising. That they're starting to get backed into a corner by states and municipalities is a good sign.

    Free market my goddamned fucking ass ... let the fuckers compete starting from the curb, and then we'll begin to see if there can be such a thing as a free market.

    Of course, Ajit Pai the great puppet of the telcos will probably hand it masters relief from this, because he's such a paid shill it isn't funny.

    Welcome to your oligarchy, America. If you think you have, or ever will have, a free market, you're fucking delusional.

    Somehow I want to see killer clowns executing corporate executives after reading this article. That would be awesome.

    • by b0s0z0ku ( 752509 ) on Thursday March 15, 2018 @09:35PM (#56267373)

      Go to France...

      You have a choice of 4 ISPs in many parts of the country, not just cable/DSL. Fast >100MB service can be as cheap as $30/mo equivalent.

      Funny that a more socialist country has more competition than the "free market, Horatio Alger" USA.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Solandri ( 704621 )

      And this is why all of the people telling us the market will find a solution are utterly full of shit.

      What free market? Verizon has a government-granted monopoly in these areas.

      The free-market is always going to be filled with players who will do anything to get an advantage. They'll outright lie to you or manipulate the game to their advantage.

      Exactly right. Which is why in a free market, you have competition. You allow multiple players to offer products and services. If one regularly rips off custom

      • Yes, it is poor government regulation.

        However, the free market wouldn't have touched this kind of project. You have companies that have bought the baby Bells, who in turn inherited the infrastructure of the original Bell monopoly. Those companies have what is often the only existing telecommunications infrastructure in the area. For another company to compete, like Google tried with their fiber service, means trying to set up a competing infrastructure to something that has been in place for decades. Th

        • by jezwel ( 2451108 )
          In many cases it appears that government recognised that telcos would not rollout to their areas as it was non-profitable unless they had 100% captured market share to squeeze dry. Hence the government granted monopoly. The telco reneging on deals is the problem - currently under rectification here in some areas at least going by the summary. (Of course this is glossing over corruption on any level).
        • by nasch ( 598556 )

          However, the free market wouldn't have touched this kind of project.

          Some would say that is the ideal scenario for a government project...

    • by jezwel ( 2451108 )

      It's about fucking time we recognized that if telcos want to compete for our business (instead of telling us what we can have as a monopoly) that the cabling which comes to our homes must be common and universal.

      Free market my goddamned fucking ass ... let the fuckers compete starting from the curb, and then we'll begin to see if there can be such a thing as a free market.

      We tried that in Australia - fibre to the premise (FTTP) for everywhere financially viable (93% was the latest estimate), fixed wireless / satellite elsewhere. All centrally owned by a government backed entity, with eventually private investment. Was in rollout stage (slow, but on budget) and working OK until that government was voted out (for other reasons) and the new incoming government changed strategy to use the cheapest to connect technology (which typically excludes fibre) as the preferred connecti

  • by rsilvergun ( 571051 ) on Thursday March 15, 2018 @10:31PM (#56267561)
    and tax cuts for the fiber network they were paid to build and never did? Seriously, why the hell do we never call companies to task on this shit? You know, they couldn't get away with it if we'd stop voting people in who let them. Why do we keep doing that!?
  • As in Pennsylvania, Verizon has been neglecting its fixed wired infrastructure in its bid to first sabotage copper service, then force customers to adopt alternative solutions.

    I had Verizon for a home POTS (copper) landline until a few years ago - ('cause it works through all but an extended city-wide power outage). I started having problems with reliability and the tech said they wouldn't fix it and I'd have to "upgrade" to FiOS. Since I already had TV and Internet service with Cox, I just switched to them for phone too -- addition reason, there was no where to easily/nicely mount the new Verizon gear near the exiting hook-up and the TV/Internet hook-up is on the other side of

  • that NN ready paper insulated wireline.
  • Verizon will extend fiber to 10,000 to 12,000 households not currently served by it in Long Island and Verizon's "Upstate Reporting Region" (these are Verizon-specific regions, not geographical areas, so "Long Island" may mean more than just the island).

    The agreement says there will be about 7000 on Long Island itself. With a population of 7.8 million and assuming 3 per household that means Verizon will get round to at most 1 in 400 households. If that's worth celebrating what has their performance been l

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