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Open Source Operating Systems Television

LG Releases Open-Sourced Version of webOS in Hopes To Push It Beyond TVs and Smart Refrigerators (theverge.com) 96

LG has released an open-sourced version of webOS that's freely available to anyone that wants to download and poke around the code. From a report: The release of webOS Open Source Edition is meant to act as a catalyst to drive further adoption of webOS beyond LG televisions, smart refrigerators, and the occasional never-to-be-released smartwatch. So, devices like webOS tablets and set-top boxes as pictured in the LG-supplied image above. This is the second time an open-source version of webOS has been released, the first coming under the failed tenure of HP back in 2011. LG's cross-town rival Samsung develops and uses the open-sourced Tizen operating system on a variety of devices including smartwatches, televisions, Blu-ray players, and robotic vacuums.
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LG Releases Open-Sourced Version of webOS in Hopes To Push It Beyond TVs and Smart Refrigerators

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  • I miss my palmOS phone

    • Maybe I'll be able to update mine. For whatever reason it's the only smartphone that I kept - box, manual, adapters, and all. I think I still have the water bottle too! And the wireless charging system was fantastic - I bought an extra one for the office. It really was a well designed system - I miss the central email/calendar subscription portal "one-app-to-rule-them-all" design.

      It was a great phone. Well, except the GPS never worked. And the keyboard kept writing repeating letters when pressed. An

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Since neither TFS nor even TFA bothered--the license is Apache 2.0.

    • Smart TVs... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by sycodon ( 149926 ) on Tuesday March 20, 2018 @12:31PM (#56291403)

      ...are stupid.

      The "smarts" drive up cost, increase complexity, and reduce your flexibility.

      Just give me a great screen with HDMI input and leave it at that. I will decide what smart thing will be hooked up to it.

      • Smart devices are for dumb people.

      • I will decide what smart thing will be hooked up to it.

        Why not both?

        Joking aside, the cost and complexity is an insignificant part of the equation given the electronics needed to process and display a modern signal these days. I'm far more worried about security.

  • by jellomizer ( 103300 ) on Tuesday March 20, 2018 @10:51AM (#56290815)

    It did work for Netscape. While the company died, its technology lives on in our Firefox browsers.
    However for the most part it is like putting your trash on a freighter and sending it over to a third would country to see if any of those people wants your trash.
    Now there was a lot of love towards WebOS and many and was ahead of its time in a lot of features. However the question for today is it worth it, with the competitors over the past decade had improved their products, and what was ahead of its time, is now behind the times.
    WebOS is akin to BeOS, Amiga, Apple Lisa, Osborn, Sega Dreamcast... Good ideas, just implemented at a time where was too ambitious and people didn't need such features on particular hardware.

    • The problem back then is still the same today - economics. BeOS and co was great, it just was too expensive at the time especially considering the switch in the ecosystem.

      It was cheaper to go to Linux if you wanted to switch ecosystems or stay on WinDOS 95 or 98 if you already have the applications than go with BeOS or OS/2 Merlin on PS/2 which not only did not have the ecosystem, the cost was twice or triple the price of a regular system even though the hardware was well beyond the x86 of the time. SGI had

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        A lot of that is "between the ears".

        MacOS doesn't have quite the "ecosystem" that windows has, and buying the hardware is more expensive to boot... but even IBM has figured out that the total cost over the economic life of the hardware, MacOS beats windows hands down. And what is it they do, really? Office work. You don't need a gazillion little "apps" to provide one button, or a handful of buttons, to make the thing "go" at every teeny little task. Yet that is what the windows "ecosystem" mostly comes down

      • Unfortunately, technology success and failures and if it is ahead of its time or not... Can only be judged in pass tense.
        BeOS and its price, just may had been a hit and considered a a great new product, if perhaps only a small number of elements were different. Lets say Adobe decided to ditch the dying company of Apple, and move over its flagship products to BeOS, or IBM still sour about OS/2 may had moved many of its properties (Lotus Suite) to BeOS as a way to snub Microsoft. Or DOSBox and/or DOSEmu got

    • It did work for Netscape. While the company died, its technology lives on in our Firefox browsers.

      I don't see that as a bad thing. Keep in mind all the niche iterations - Palemoon, Iceweasel, Seamonkey, and so on. None have critical mass, but all benefit from Netscape.

      However for the most part it is like putting your trash on a freighter and sending it over to a third would country to see if any of those people wants your trash.

      If the alternative is burning it or burying it, and we're dealing with industrial or consumer waste as opposed to food waste or other biohazards, then that's not necessarily a bad thing. I'd far rather some industrious third world people disassemble a curling iron to heat their water or whatever, rather than just assume it's all actual-jun

    • WebOS is akin to BeOS

      The last fast system in a world of incredibly slow turds? Where can I buy one? But actually I'm going to argue against your premise:

      However the question for today is it worth it, with the competitors over the past decade had improved their products, and what was ahead of its time, is now behind the times.

      Improved in what way? Samsung is now advertising TVs with quad core processors in order to get their smart interface to run smoothly. That doesn't sound improved, it sounds like it is so incredibly bloated and poorly written than the most basic of functionality needs some serious hardware thrown at it. If WebOS can be more like BeOS it could potentially dominate in this market

  • Stop giving me a half finished, half documented "open source" operating system that still puts me in your ecosystem.

    I just want uboot, fastboot and mainline support.

    My current 'HTPC' is a device that I SSH to and run mpv from. I don't want your GUI stack. Just let me write my own stack.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Stop crying like normal and go develop the full stack then. Itâ(TM)s not rocket science. Use buildroot. There are kernel, gpu and uboot templates for pretty much every arm platform from the last 10 years. It takes less than an hour to download, configure for chosen platform and compile a kernel, dtb, modules, uboot and rootfs from usually mainline sources. If mainline support isnâ(TM)t there it pulls in the oem bsp.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I bought an LG TV about 2 years ago, with the older version of WebOS (2.0), mostly because it was all I could afford. I've been pleasantly surprised that the TV still gets software updates every few months, as do the apps (err ... though the YouTube app is the only one I use).
    The TV is still quick and responsive, and plays every video I have on the connected USB drives.

    I thought I was going to be disappointed I couldn't afford an Android TV, but am not. So good luck LG.

  • Call me old-fashioned, but instead of a fridge with a display that I'll never be looking at I actually wouldn't mind a decent fridge with a Modbus RTU (or TCP) interface that lets me read a few coils (door closed? alarm buzzer on?) and registers (current temperature top shelve, bottom shelve, humidity) and maybe write a few registers (target temperature, buzzer activation threshold temperature). This way it could easily be hooked up to an existing home automation system - which then can be configured to pre

    • I think we might be the only two people (even here) that would want that. Hell, I'll even take BACnet!

      I would also like to know compressor amps and either interval data or cycle time or something to help "smartify" energy consumption. Extra bonus for a register you can write to as a short-term demand response mode.

      Viewing the information in a browser isn't the end of the world... just more crap to parse. The idea of the cameras in the fridge makes a few things interesting with a more robust system... but

      • by Strider- ( 39683 )

        I've implemented that... But on a set of walk-in refrigerators and freezers, not on a home refrigeration system. We did this after someone left the door open, causing $2500 in ice cream to melt overnight...

        In my case, though, it's implemented with one-wire sensors and a one-wire to SNMP gateway. (So yes, the refrigeration units are monitorable via SNMP, and show up in my NMS,,, I'm that kind of geek...)

  • by Zorro ( 15797 ) on Tuesday March 20, 2018 @11:25AM (#56290997)

    Why would you want your Vacuum Cleaner on the internet? All it really has to do is suck.

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Microsoft Vacuum Cleaner 1.0 - finally a Microsoft product that doesn't suck!

    • Why would you want your Vacuum Cleaner on the internet? All it really has to do is suck.

      Imagine how much more it will suck if it doesn't work due to a ransomeware infection!

  • The Palm Pre is still my favourite phone.

    Handier, more ergonomic, better than all the enormous phablets manufacturers force on the sheeple nowadays.

    Then HP killed it.

  • Is it locked down from the user? If so who cares.

    • by HiThere ( 15173 )

      I think it's not the OS that is locked down, but rather the hardware. At least that what other comments cause me to think. Personally, I'm still wondering what use it is. An OS for a refrigerator???

  • The build procedure is tailored to Ubuntu14.04 LTS 64-bit.

    I'll be looking forward to a virtual machine image or a LiveDVD version.

  • The problem with these OS'es is that they don't have any apps. If I run Android on my television I can run gazzilion apps and games for every possible scenario imaginable and I can expect that they will be supported for some time.There is a problem with support for all these third party systems. I can expect that for example Netflix will be supported for a very long time on Android given the user base. But the chances that Netflix will be supported in webOS for the version on your TV in the next 10 years is

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