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Education Mozilla

Web Literacy Standard Announced By Mozilla 64

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the required-reading dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Doug Belshaw and Carla Casilli, along with a community of stakeholders, have been working on a specification of skills needed for web literacy. Doug report that Brett Gaylor and Chris Lawrence announced version 1.0 of the spec. In a nutshell it's described as 'A map of the territory for the skills and competencies Mozilla and community think are important to get better at to more effectively read, write & participate on the Web.' Usages include writing curricula influenced by it, and issuing Open Badges that align with it (using the 'alignment' metadata field). Doug also calls for help with localization of the spec into other languages."
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Web Literacy Standard Announced By Mozilla

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  • Huh? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by mythosaz (572040) on Monday October 28, 2013 @06:36PM (#45264111)

    I can't be the only one confused by this article summary. It's going to take an hour of reading Wikipedia to figure it out...

    • I can't be the only one confused by this article summary. It's going to take an hour of reading Wikipedia to figure it out...

      It's the Al Gore pokemon, which hit the graveyard a number of years back, but apparently Mozilla just played the Monster Reborn! card. Remember how he said "We must also promote global access to the Internet. We need to bridge the digital divide not just within our country, but among countries. Only by giving people around the world access to this technology can they tap into the potential of the Information Age." Yup. That. It's baaaaaaack.

      Up next, throwing down a wall of magikarp while they desperately tr

      • by narcc (412956)

        Wait, that was bad?

        Can they tap in to the potential of the information age some other way?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I felt the same way, went to the site and divined its purpose, however since Literacy is its purpose one would expect they might have attempted to utilize some.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Is first posting a skill or a competency?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      If you actually get first post and write something funny then it's a skill. If you don't, then Mozilla award a "YOU FAIL IT!" badge.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    * Supporting open and non-DRMed standards, so the web doesn't turn into TV 2.0

    * Blocking advertisements, since they violate privacy and in some cases carry malware

    * Supporting non-locked-down systems, so that running tools like adblock remains up to the people, not to multinational corporations.

    * Blocking javascript by default, for the same reasons

    * The essential principles of public key crypto, and how to keep their communications secure.

    Surely we should be educating people about those things too?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      You want to educate people not to spend money? Your business plan is intriguing to me, and I wish to participate in your bankruptcy liquidation auction.

    • Blocking advertisements

      "You are using an ad blocker. You have three ad-free views left this month. Please subscribe for unlimited ad-free views."

      Blocking javascript by default, for the same reasons

      All third-party apps in Firefox OS are written in JavaScript. Good luck writing web applications without it, especially web applications intended to run with zero bars.

      The essential principles of public key crypto

      Would this include how to travel long distances to a key signing party in the same city as someone with whom you wish to communicate?

      • by Anonymous Coward

        "You are using an ad blocker. You have three ad-free views left this month. Please subscribe for unlimited ad-free views."

        Tough luck. The internet was doing just fine before paywalls. It will be better once they die. I've honestly don't know a single person that even considers them. People just surf away to somewhere else when they encounter one.

        Would this include how to travel long distances to a key signing party in the same city as someone with whom you wish to communicate?

        No, because that is not even vaguely necessary.

        • The internet was doing just fine before paywalls.

          The Wall Street Journal has been paywalled since 1997. This is more than two-thirds of the time that the World Wide Web has existed.

          I've honestly don't know a single person that even considers them. People just surf away to somewhere else when they encounter one.

          Not everyone has that luxury, especially when the only lawful source of a given work is paywalled, or all publishers of a given class of works collude to set up a paywall. See the recent Slashdot story Why Johnny Can't Speak [slashdot.org].

          Would this include how to travel long distances to a key signing party in the same city as someone with whom you wish to communicate?

          No, because that is not even vaguely necessary.

          How else do you verify that the person you're communicating with is the person you think you're communicating with, not a man in the middle? Just because

  • Pointless (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 28, 2013 @06:48PM (#45264201)

    This is utterly pointless crap. No one needs web literacy merit badges. My 70-year-old grandmother gets around just fine on the net without some crummy scout badge. Kids surf the net with ease before they learn not to drink bleach. No one needs net training; it's a false demand created by academics who don't understand that there are more pressing first-world problems to solve, like teaching people to distinguish between an oak and a holm oak.

    • I'm having trouble figuring out their interface and what all is available in their double tabbed page layout. My degree in CompSci doesn't seem to be helping, but that makes sense, because before I got lost, I think it said something about credentials and experience being irrelevant.

      I think what they are trying to do is design a standard for web competency and then let you "learn anywhere," e.i. let someone else figure out how to teach you these things and then you can come back and use their page creation

    • Soon you won't be able to get a job unless you are Firefox Web Certified. HR managers are going to love this. It will make their job a lot easier.
    • You've never worked a helpdesk, have you? There are few things more painful than spending 40 minutes on a call with someone who can't figure out how to copy and paste, or type their username and password into the provided and labeled fields.

      These are people working for some of the biggest engineering firms in the world. I only wish I were joking.

  • 4chan badge (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 28, 2013 @06:59PM (#45264293)

    Who wants to show off having earned their 4chan badge?

  • >> Community Participation Getting involved in web communities and understanding their practices

    • Encouraging participation in web communities
    • Using constructive criticism in a group or community setting
    • Configuring settings within tools used by online communities
    • Participating in both synchronous and asynchronous discussions
    • Expressing opinions appropriately in web discussions
    • and Defining different terminology used within online communities

    WTF? TL;DR.

    • by fatphil (181876)
      Plenty of whatthefuckery within. From their wiki page:
      """
      Who is using Open Badges?
              * User stories -- Hypothetical examples of how badges can help solve problems in everyday scenarios.
      """

      So, if top of the list of people using it are "hypothetical examples", can we assume that the real "Who is using Open Badges?" FAQ answer should be "Basically nobody - only me and my imaginary friends."?
  • Why do you need to do all three? Many people use the Web as a data feed, and don't do any of this "Web 2.0" stuff - not I, since clearly I'm participating here. Why assume everyone is a 15yo girl on Facebook? Why even have a spec?

    • by fatphil (181876)
      Who knows, who cares.

      All I know is that when these catch on, twisted fuckers like me will make up a whole bunch of fake ones in order to dilute them to a level where they can be safely ignored.

      I think I'll offer read, write, and participate badges for "goatse".
      Probably offer an "NSA" badge too. If you think you've had your mail read by the NSA, then you can have one of those.
  • Simple Web Literacy (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Knowing not to visit sites with "goatse" in the url is literacy enough.

  • by fatphil (181876) on Monday October 28, 2013 @07:40PM (#45264599) Homepage
    So would I, I'm sure. It'll be some modeish clap-trap that many greybeards will have rejected as not sufficiently better than what we were doing before 99% of the current internet population had even heard of the net.

    Know how to say HELO, or GOMFL!
  • by sootman (158191) on Monday October 28, 2013 @07:58PM (#45264709) Homepage Journal

    Step 1: ALWAYS SHOW THE FUCKING STATUS BAR! (Firefox, Safari.) And make it the whole width of the window. (Chrome) And it should do exactly ONE thing: show the exact, complete URL of a link you're hovering over.

    That is all.

    Actually, wait, it isn't. Step 2: ALWAYS SHOW THE ENTIRE URL IN THE URL BAR -- INCLUDING the protocol and all the other ugly bits. In one color text. Again, as much as the width of the window will allow you to see. MAYBE put the main domain in bold so it looks like www.bankofamerica.ihaxxoryou.com/give/me/your/money. But let me turn that off if I know what I'm doing.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I'm reading Slashdot?! How did that happen I don't even.

    • by fatphil (181876)
      I just went to their standards webpage, and right at the top was greeted by this:
      """
      Your browser may lack functionality needed by Webmaker to function properly. Please upgrade your browser for an improved experience.
      """

      Skroo yoo! I like w3m, I can run it in a screen that I can pick up from an SSH session. (Likewise lynx and links, I'm not saying anything against those.) Whatever kid was behind this "standard" can get of my bloody lawn!
    • by dtremenak (893336)
      I think the browser you're looking for is Seamonkey. The status bar is always visible. The status bar shows exact link URLs. The URL bar shows the entire, exact URL, with the main domain in black and the rest in dark grey (same visual effect as bolding, but without changing character width, so it's easier to read).
      • by Dagger2 (1177377)

        That's not the problem the GP is talking about. The problem is the default configuration of the browsers most people are using.

        People who know what they're doing can change the configuration or seek out alternatives. However, in order to become a "person that knows what they're doing", you need to start somewhere. How are people ever going to learn about URLs if you munge the address bar?

    • Step 3: Show a throbber when a page is loading. IE doesn't give any indication that it is doing something.

    • I was going to mod up, but:

      1. You're already at +5

      2. I just looked up and here is the content of my URL bar: http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/10/28/2241252/web-literacy-standard-announced-by-mozilla

      So, it at least looks like FF 24 can do what you want - even the main domain is in bold (ok, actually it's normal, the rest is slightly greyed out). The URL bar is only about half the width of the browser window, however. I unfortunately do not remember what "new" setting I had to unchange to restore this behav

  • Anyone else notice that leaving noscript on shows you all the answers and just gives you the badge?

    • by SeaFox (739806)

      Anyone else notice that leaving noscript on shows you all the answers and just gives you the badge?

      If you're versed enough in Internet browsers to use NoScript and not have it ruin your normal web experience, you should be able to pass the test with flying colors anyway.

  • The Web Literacy Standard: a map of the territory for the skills and competencies Mozilla and community think are important to get better at to more effectively read, write & participate on the Web.

    Who ever wrote that run-on sentence needs to some old fashioned literacy,

    • by Anonymous Coward

      It reads like a mission statement. That's a genre in and of itself, and it has rules, one of which is that it should be incomprehensible to the average reader as a sign that it is in fact, in the final analysis, meaningless. Another rule is that the mission statement must be one "sentence" (for whatever value of "sentence" would horrify even Cicero's periodic prose style). Another, that every stakeholder should have a say in what goes into that "sentence," which for any number of stakeholders greater tha

  • Dear Mozilla:

    I have been sending money your way because I thought it was used to develop Firefox and Thunderbird and other useful code; but for this shite, I rather keep my money.

    What's next? The Al Gore achievement award?

    Jeez!

  • I can't believe nobody has said "we don't need no steenking badges" yet, or pointed out that the exact lines of the quote are different [youtube.com]

  • I expect version 20.0 by December.
  • ... if anything can tame lame social networking and blogs about cats, it would be throwing stifling academia and certifications at it.

    People would lose interest in the net in no time.

  • web literacy: don't use software where the "designers" claim the right to broadcast UI changes to you at their whim.

  • to get better at to more effectively read, write & participate on the Web

    Did someone say literacy?

"In the face of entropy and nothingness, you kind of have to pretend it's not there if you want to keep writing good code." -- Karl Lehenbauer

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