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Students Remember Lectures Better Taking Notes Longhand Than Using Laptops 191

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the blame-keyboards dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Walk into any university lecture hall and you're likely to see row upon row of students sitting behind glowing laptop screens. Laptops in class have been controversial, due mostly to the many opportunities for distraction that they provide (online shopping, browsing Reddit, or playing solitaire, just to name a few). But few studies have examined how effective laptops are for the students who diligently take notes. Now Robinson Meyer writes at The Atlantic that a new study finds that people remember lectures better when they've taken handwritten notes, rather than typed ones. The research suggests that even when laptops are used solely to take notes, they may still be impairing learning because their use results in shallower processing. 'Our new findings suggest that even when laptops are used as intended — and not for buying things on Amazon during class — they may still be harming academic performance,' says psychological scientist Pam Mueller of Princeton University, lead author of the study. Laptop note takers' tendency to transcribe lectures verbatim rather than processing information and reframing it in their own words is detrimental to learning. If you can type quickly enough, word-for-word transcription is possible, whereas writing by hand usually rules out capturing every word. 'We don't write longhand as fast as we type these days, but people who were typing just tended to transcribe large parts of lecture content verbatim,' says Mueller. 'The people who were taking notes on the laptops don't have to be judicious in what they write down.'"
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Students Remember Lectures Better Taking Notes Longhand Than Using Laptops

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  • Imagine that. And how much money did that cost? [end sarcasm]
  • Our brains evolved to learn fine motor skills like chipping flint. Writing notes by hand engages those motor skills and that learning process. Don't just go through your book and highlight important passages - that does almost nothing. Take notes in class. Make notes on those notes when you study.
    • When I learned to type back in the day, we were basically taught not to read what we were typing. We could literally type copy from gibberish and get it right, precisely because we were not trying to comprehend what we were typing.

    • by Tough Love (215404) on Monday May 05, 2014 @10:26PM (#46925077)

      It's hard to remember what's in the lecture while you're reading Slashdot.

    • Is make notes in the margins. I found my understanding went up drastically when I did that and put down my understanding of what the author was trying to get at in the margin. (Often this amounted to "I bet he's going for concept X that was in chapter 4." and at the end of the paragraph put down if I was correct or not.)
    • by plopez (54068)

      It's called "Kinesthetic Learning" and it has been known of for at least 50 years.

  • You know what worked better for me then longhand notes? No notes. Listening to the teacher instead of writing worked best for me. Turns out I recalled things better when I spent my attention listening to the teacher rather then trying to write legible notes so I could read then later.

    Just goes to show that people learn differently and making blanket statements for all people gets you into trouble :)

    Min

    • I find this too.

      It was a startling realization that I could take notes during a lecture, walk out and not have a clue what was being said - this is handwritten notes too.

      So I gave up on notes and focused on the lecture itself, since afterall I can copy out content from a book anytime.

    • Same for me too. Writing by hand always occupied too much of my attention, so I never internalized and processed what was being said very well, let alone get it down on paper in a form that would job my memory of that understanding later. If I simply didn't take notes, I tended to understand the material better, so long as I relied on other source materials to help fill in gaps in my knowledge.

      Taking notes on laptops actually did work for me eventually, but only after I realized that taking them word-for-wo

    • by Moof123 (1292134)

      People learn differently. I am like you, I learn best taking very sparse notes, mostly just following the lecture. Occasionally jotting down key equations or highlights. I almost never used my note afterwards, just a way to cement certain things in my head.

    • by Mashiki (184564)

      You know what worked better for me then longhand notes? No notes. Listening to the teacher instead of writing worked best for me

      I had a law professor(criminal and constitutional) that taught by example, using case law to explain what happened and why it happened as such. I still remember what he taught, and how he taught it. I don't remember shit on the provincial statues, because of the way it was taught.

    • by Nemyst (1383049)
      I took notes because of the "just in case" feeling I'd get otherwise, but in retrospect I probably should've done just this. I almost never came back to the notes, so all I ended up with was a large amount of (usually unintelligible) scribbling that'd sleep on my desk until the end of the semester. It's also why the courses where all the notes were available online were my favorites, as then I didn't feel compelled to take notes and could instead just listen.
    • by Dutch Gun (899105)

      Yep, I was the same way. Taking notes distracted me from concentrating on the lecture at hand. The textbooks and handouts were always there to review the material if I wanted, but I discovered that I had a very high retention rate of the information presented when I simply listened and concentrated on what I was being said.

      The whole "you must take notes as you listen to the lecture" mentality is horrible advice for people like me who can't multi-task. It was only very late in my schooling that I finally

    • by khb (266593)

      Indeed. In one of my first college courses we were permitted to take notes in the (very small) margin of the text itself. This led to focus on the instructor and very small amounts of note taking.

      In High School I took more notes and learned less.

      The best situation was where I took little or not notes, but paid one of the transcribers for the hearing impaired for their professional notes (in those dark days before professors provided pointers to their web page ;>). I focused on the lecture, and a professi

    • by mwvdlee (775178)

      The point is not to write notes you can read later, the point is to involve the fine motor system of your brain.
      The learning process is the writing, not the reading.

      • by Minupla (62455)

        Yep, but I'm dysgraphic, so anything involving my fine motor system is a cognitive, rather then an associative task, as it probably is for you. E.g. writing requires cognitive processing for me as opposed to happening as an 'automatic' background task as it likely does for you.

        Thus my point about the danger of making sweeping statements for 'students'. We all learn differently, so making decisions based on this sort of study is treacherous ground.

        Min

    • Well, they have done extensive studies which show that people learn much better when they take notes. It is possible you are an exception to this rule. However, I think it likely that the problem was that you spent time trying to write legible notes. The studies about taking notes did not say that actually reading the notes was necessary for the improved learning (actually, they showed that just taking the notes improved learning, without ever looking at them again).
    • by CastrTroy (595695)
      I am the exact same way. I think it annoyed other students that I was able to do so well without taking any notes. The downside of this method is that I often fell asleep in class if I was too tired and it was a particularly boring lecture.
    • by anorlunda (311253)

      Ditto what Minulpa said.

      Ease of handwriting is personal. Some people, like me, require intense focus to write longhand legibly. Thst means shutting out hearing what is going on while I write.

      The correct answer is longhand for some, keyboards for others, and no notes for still others. Averages are as useless as an average bra size for women.

    • not for me. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by oneiros27 (46144) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @07:27AM (#46927049) Homepage

      I had a teacher who didn't allow you to take notes in his class ... because it was all in the book.

      Of course, he wrote the book, and his 'teaching' was him copying examples from the book onto the overhead machine each class. If you couldn't follow along in class, you couldn't get a different take from reading the book, as it was THE EXACT SAME THING.

      But not taking notes in class meant that I fell asleep 10-15 min into each class. I also recall things by remembering where on the page I wrote things (top, left side, in green ink). I also make notes on how excited a teacher seems about an idea, if they spend a lot of time on a topic, or if they specifically say 'this will be on the test' ... so I have something to skim through before the test. (and then try to decrypt what my chicken scratch of hand writing actually says)

      Maybe listening and not writing is better for remembering things (as the professor claimed), but not if you can't stay awake through lectures on fluid dynamics & beam mechanics. And it also leaves you nothing to review before the tests and/or to share with friends who might've been sick and missed a class. (or for you to borrow from them)

    • by jittles (1613415)

      You know what worked better for me then longhand notes? No notes. Listening to the teacher instead of writing worked best for me. Turns out I recalled things better when I spent my attention listening to the teacher rather then trying to write legible notes so I could read then later.

      Just goes to show that people learn differently and making blanket statements for all people gets you into trouble :)

      Min

      Doodling usually worked best for me. If I am not doing something with my hands then my mind starts moving onto other things and I completely lose track of the lecture. Though I will say that I found the laptop to be quite nice. I could type notes fast enough that I could almost do a word for word transcription of the teacher's lecture. I didn't do that. I would listen, and "doodle" on the trackpad (just move the mouse cursor in circles) and then quickly type what important bit I wanted to remember from

      • +1 for doodling. I remember a slashdot article some time back that said people doodle to keep their minds occupied, since the lecture itself was simply not intellectually stimulating enough to require their full attention, and that it actually *helped* learning because it stopped them from dozing of or just completely losing concentration. I remember sitting and paying full attention for some of the more interesting classes, like advanced data structures, or chemistry. But for "How to write a resume and
    • I remember being taught that.....back in the day, at a study skills workshop my campus counseling center sponsored.

      The recommended taking thorough book notes before the lecture, then going to the lecture with questions about the material, using the lecture as a time to think about the material.

    • by Reapy (688651)

      I was the same way. I hardly ever took notes, I guess I wasn't a perfect student, but I found that if I took lots of notes in class I would do much worse, I would spend all my energy on writing it down and trying to keep up with what was being said, my attention divided, learning less of everything. Instead I just like to listen and focus, and if I really wanted to remember it, write a summary after.

      For stuff I had to work through like math and CS I would write it down. Also when starting a new program or p

    • by antdude (79039)

      For me, I forget easily so I need something recorded. Same for taking notes. :(

  • I found going to class every day, even hung over, and taking notes in my own hand set me up far better than studying 10 hours for a final and trying to cram it all in.

  • When in college, I would take copious notes during class with pen and paper. When preparing for a test, I would retype the notes over and over. Once I could type all of the notes without looking at my notebook, I felt ready to take the test. This is clearly memorization for the sake of the test, but I retained much. I also graduated with a cumulative GPA of 3.92, so I think it's fair to say my process was effective.

    • I was taught something similar. You takes notes, then later on you make notes of your notes, then notes of your notes of your notes, keep going on until you only have a bulleted list of topics, and just by looking at each bulleted item should be able to remember anything
      Who knows if it worked or not, my most effective method of "studying" was cramming hours before the exam.

  • how much do the students retain when taking notes on a galaxy note tablet?

  • I often advise students to take notes longhand and then use their tablet camera to collect them, or better yet, transcribe them into a device. Yes it takes time. No you did not buy that device to save time, you bought it to communicate and organize.

  • The Zeigarnik Effect [psychwiki.com]

    Not only will you remember your lectures, you will have constant intrusive thoughts. So much so that you will underperform your current tasks because of the constant intrusive thoughts from remembering your lectures!

    Seriously, why in the world would you want to remember everything? You only remember something until the task is done and forget about it. That is how the brain works. You only need to remember the lectures until the finals and then the brain flushes it out.

    Remembering

    • Why did you attend university?

    • For the only reference you thought relevant enough to cite, it is awful full of weasel words like "may", ending with a solid, weasel free conclusion based on nothing concretely shown. I hope there is a better source, otherwise this ranks near homeopathy for everyone not writing a doctoral thesis on it.

  • by Kittenman (971447) on Monday May 05, 2014 @10:47PM (#46925207)
    Anyone use those, these days? Harder (but not impossible) to enter that into a laptop with 'Word' or Google Docs.
  • If you had a laptop sitting there, why the hell would you be typing in notes instead of recording the entire lecture to your drive?

    Personally I dont get a damned thing from lectures. Some dude speaking at me while I have no real ability to stop and ask substantiative questions is pointless. Watching a video later, or on-line so I can pause to get me questions answered via google is the the next best thing to having a tutor or being an apprentice. I guess some peoples minds just work different.

    • Lectures work really really well when you need to have a conceptual understanding of a subject. I always found biology lectures useful, because the subject is extremely concept oriented and you need to understand that. Same with chemistry, and the same with physics - interestingly.

      What I've found absolutely doesn't work for me is mathematics (and mathematics heavy subject) lectures. I have no idea how anyone learns a thing from lectures on mathematics. At least in first and second year, my experience of mat

  • What about online video lecturers vs big classes.

    What about lecturers where they just read from the book and that's it?

    What about lecturers where the only real value is the grade from showing up?

    • What about lecturers where the only real value is the grade from showing up?

      That kinda answers itself, doesn't it?

  • What if a university did mandatory recording of every lecture and posted them online? Besides forcing their professors to always be politically correct and watching what they say, what other bad things would this do? I think it could educate people who aren't even those classes. You could even post them for people to listen who don't even go to your college. But would this shoot colleges in the foot? Would people continue to pay for secondary education if everything was available for free online?
    • It's pretty much going to happen anyway, not every academic can be tenured or make a career out of it. The only things that couldn't really be done online are lab work and exams.

    • UNSW actually is trying to do this, but so far it seems very opt-in. If you use overhead projectors then it doesn't go into the recording.

      I suspect they are allowing the system to be way too cooperative with the lecturers where it should probably be a little more adversarial - ensure nothing used to present in that room isn't recorded.

      • by HJED (1304957)
        No, they're just being cheap by not installing cameras in every lecture theatre. I've yet to have any lecturers who has turned the system off though.
    • by mysidia (191772)

      What if a university did mandatory recording of every lecture and posted them online?

      Can't post them online without permission from the presentor, due to their copyright.

      Some professors have even gone so far as to force students [slashdot.org] to turn in all their notes at the end of the semester, for destruction, and file lawsuits against professional notetakers [wired.com].

    • by HJED (1304957)
      My university does this (records sound and computer screens so not always useful), a very small number of lecturers turn it off. It is good for catching up or reviewing a topic, but I tend to find that the face to face lecturers allow me to learn better. (And I take notes on my laptop)
      One of my lecturers has gone further and recorded all of his lecturers with videos, it allows the course to cover more content as the pre-recorded lectures don't take up class time where extension lecturers and some repeat
    • by PPH (736903)

      What about Q&A sessions following the lecture? If you are not present, you don't get the oportunity to have the instructor clarify some points. Even using some sort of messaging or discussion board, the issues are not as clear in your head as immediately following the lecture. Good lecturers can gauge the mood of their audience (class) and adjust their delivery to reinforce confusing points if they sense comprehension problems. Some even take questions in mid lecture.

      And then there's the really bad pro

  • I found that writing long or shorthand dampened my learning experience.

    However, I'm pretty sure I'm an edge case. I had years of experience at call centers prior.

  • by VortexCortex (1117377) <VortexCortex.project-retrograde@com> on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @12:12AM (#46925609)

    So, let me get this straight. You get the professors to repeatedly deliver a long winded lecture to a room full of students. Each student must record important bits of the lecture as notes. Then you assign work for them to do on their own and gague the degree of their inability to cope with the most moronic "learning program" in the universe? Dumb.

    Take a step back for a second, look at the big picture, and THINK. You have technology now, USE it. Wouldn't it be better to Record a good lecture by the professor once, (update recording on changes, to include clarifications or additional info if needed)? Then you can assign each student to watch the lecture on their own time thus decentralizing the primary training set consumption. The students can pause, rewind, etc. and write down any questions they have about answering some example questions at the lecture end. Then the Professor and Students meet to DISCUSS the Lecture they already consumed and clarify any questions, aiming to work out any misunderstandings BEFORE you assign them a task to gauge the degree of knowledge they have now learned?

    It's like you're purposefully trying not to divide information over space-time properly. It's fucking Pathetic, and you should be ashamed.

    • The missing part of your argument I think is not just "1 professor".

      What you want to do is get a whole bunch to record the relevant lectures - ideally people who are very diverse in style. Then let the students pick the one they find works best for them.

      Of course you could then take this further: have a project to post-process and bookmark the content covered in each section, so if you're struggling with a concept then you get a splay of dozens of that same lecture over the years, from different people, so

  • The idea is not to write down what the lecturer says as fast as possible, but rather to pay attention to what they are saying, think about it briefly, rephrase it in your mind, and write down a brief summary note about the point that was made. Sure you have to write down formulas and equations accurately, but that's not "taking notes" -- it's copying from the board/overhead/projector.

    When it came time to study, I'd rewrite and condense my notes even further.

    By the time I got the notes for a semester c

  • I noticed this 20 years ago, when students who faithfully transcribed notes in class on their (super-expensive) portable computers usually ended up dropping out of EE/ME/etc. and into "Engineering Management," the home for those who couldn't hack an engineering (or straight science) degree.

    They had futures either as court stenographers, or as PHBs.
  • "Laptop note takers' tendency to transcribe lectures verbatim rather than processing information and reframing it in their own words is detrimental to learning. If you can type quickly enough, word-for-word transcription is possible, whereas writing by hand usually rules out capturing every word."
    So the problem is that laptop users have bad note taking skills, not that laptops cause students to remember less... (Or rather people have bad note taking skills and it's easier to take bad notes on a laptop)
  • by quietwalker (969769) <pdughi@gmail.com> on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @04:40AM (#46926515)

    I wonder how well they'll be able to remember, if instead of using a laptop to take notes, they use their laptop to recorded and auto-transcribe it, so it can be replayed over and over. So that any parts that cause confusion can be examined until understood, without worrying about missing the next part. Where, with a press of a button, a user can mark the clip with a note; "important part here" or "come back to this, it's confusing" or even "prof says this will be on the test".

    Besides, what a stupid study. There are certain classes where 'remembering' is the most important part of the class, but at least in my engineering and science classes, 'knowing' and 'understanding' had slightly higher priority. I can easily remember the last thing I was expected to memorize, with no other expectations - in 7'th grade, US History, I was expected to memorize each president's name and their start & end dates in office, in years. Completely useless.

    Is that a laudable goal to test against for college students? That they're being judged at the 7'th grade level?

    • by Ash Vince (602485) *

      There are certain classes where 'remembering' is the most important part of the class, but at least in my engineering and science classes, 'knowing' and 'understanding' had slightly higher priority.

      Are you sure? When I studied Physics knowing and understanding were fairly important, but at least equally important if not more so was the ability to reel off a mathematical derivation at will. Generally you could not work through the derivation in the allotted exam time, unless you were doing most of it from memory with a bit of logic checking along the way.

      Knowing and understanding might be the ideal but that is much harder to test in a written exam and mark in a uniform way so you end up assigning value

      • I am sure. They correctly realized that there was little value in rote memorization.

        Maybe it depends on the quality of institution you attend, but my teachers at least were more concerned with whether or not I knew how and when to apply a given formula than rote memorization of it. Sure, they had limits; you could only bring in one sheet of formulas for a given midterm or final (which was well more than enough), but most of the time they wrote the necessary equations right on the board.

        As we're even more

        • by Ash Vince (602485) *

          I am sure. They correctly realized that there was little value in rote memorization.

          Maybe it depends on the quality of institution you attend, but my teachers at least were more concerned with whether or not I knew how and when to apply a given formula than rote memorization of it. Sure, they had limits; you could only bring in one sheet of formulas for a given midterm or final (which was well more than enough), but most of the time they wrote the necessary equations right on the board.

          As we're even more well connected, with everyone carrying a cellphone in their pocket capable of accessing nearly the whole of recorded public human knowledge in seconds, people are coming around to realize that memorization isn't as important as understanding - or almost as good, knowing how to search for information to gain understanding.

          Maybe it depends on institution, maybe also things are changing now with more coursework based degrees. I agree with you that understanding is far more important than learning by wrote in a real world setting, but in my experience all academic subjects up until you study for a master degree here in the UK enable you to obtain a passing grade more easily without understanding by simple memorisation due to the exam based nature of how they are assessed and how those exams are marked en masse, often by people

    • Besides, what a stupid study. There are certain classes where 'remembering' is the most important part of the class, but at least in my engineering and science classes, 'knowing' and 'understanding' had slightly higher priority.

      Actually, I think that was actually the point of the study.

      Students who typed tended to transcribe verbatim, effectively doing a kind of "remembering" the lecture on their computer without ever "knowing" or "understanding" the material well enough to extract the important stuff and take notes on it.

      Those who wrote things down had to be more selective -- they had to process the lecture, "understand" what was important in order to choose what notes to take, and then write it down so they could review it a

  • in pretty much all of my lectures, we were given a printed copy of the slides (3 to a page or so) at the beginning of each lecture and that worked very well as we could annotate on the sheets the explanations, additional notes etc rather than try and write the entire lecture. I'd hate to type out the lecture as diagrams would just take too long and I find I recall pictures better and having the slides printed made me recall those images easier.
  • by pr100 (653298) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @06:36AM (#46926873)

    I tend not to take notes at all during class/lectures. The material is not unique - there are plenty of other sources for that information. The point about attending is to have someone explain stuff to you in a way that makes it easy to comprehend. The best way to make use of that exposition is to pay attention and make sure you understand what's being said, asking questions if necessary.

    Make notes later.

    Contemporaneous note taking is for situations where the information that is is only available from that source and needs to be accurately recorded. Examples include doing an experiment where you need at accurate record of what was done, or taking a statement from a witness.

    • by bbasgen (165297)
      Well said. The finding of the article is interesting: student's that use laptops tend to attempt to take verbatim notes. The laptop isn't the issue, this is a problem of how to properly take notes. Class time is best used for comprehension rather than rote learning. To that end, an effective use of a laptop during class would be to look things up as the professor talks about them. As stated above, notes are best saved for after class to be taken during study time.
  • Many of us have by our own admission terrible handwriting, and have trouble reading our own notes. (And this is going to be more and more of a problem as some quarters continue viewing cursive handwriting as archaic and not worth the time needed to teach it.) Also, my paper notebook doesn't have a search function.

    For many classes I would take notes on my laptop in a continuous excel spreadsheet, then re-read and annotate them with material from the book, off the internet, etc. It worked quite well.

    .
  • I used to work with a handwriting expert to, ironically, develop a handwriting training system on a computer.

    Anyway, he used to quote studies that showed writing by hand (this was the early 1990s) gave you language skills you never developed growing up typing.

    Losing that may be a bigger and more risky experiment than we realize at this time.

  • I've always understood that taking notes forced your brain to take something short term memory and push it into longer term memory by processing what you're hearing into the written word.

    I have a stack of composition notebooks (the black and white bound ones from college) that date back over 20 years filled with my business notes. It's cheap, but it's thorough and nothing says "paying attention" like physically writing it down. I also tape business cards onto the page where I made the notes on that meeting.

  • I thought this effect had been well-known for many years. It's basic psychology.
    • by PPH (736903)

      A few years ago, I attended a talk by a psychology researcher who had done work on 'kinesthetic learning'. She had come to the conclusion that people who wrote long hand, or better yet sketched diagrams longhand, had much better understanding of subjects. Particularly where there was some diagramatic (is that a word?) aspect to the material.

  • Waconia Public High School - where my kids go - issued ipads to all the students starting with a certain grade.

    Now, a year or so on, my student WANTED to take notes longhand, as they felt that they learned the material better in that way. The teacher actually PREVENTED this student from doing so, claiming that "all the notes needed were coming to her ipad" and that the school's recommended policy is for students to then take their ipads home, and manually copy the notes in longhand there to improve retenti

    • by DarkVader (121278)

      Good call on the school's part.

      Pay attention to the lecture while it's happening. Re-copy later if it helps you. Don't re-copy if you're like me and that method is physically torturous and only detracts from learning.

  • The article makes sense to me.

    It does seem to require more "processing" to take notes by hand than type it all in.

    My trouble in school always was that my handwriting was not all that great and some of my notes later on were slightly less useful. It would have been nice to have the notes typed on the spot.

    Maybe the answer is to learn shorthand.

    Even now, years out of school, when I start a new job I have to take notes.......and fast, and what I have left is sloppy and incomplete.

    I have no idea how much effor

  • With technology, there is no need to take verbatim notes. The teacher/professor can just upload his powerpoint slides and a video of the whole lecture to the web.

    The problem it seems is that notes serve 2 different purposes. #1 Make an accurate record of the lecture contents, #2 Distill the lecture information in a way that will help you remember/understand key points. #2 Can lose a lot of information, and I know I myself am guilty of distilling lectures to the point of missing some key points. I think

    • by DarkVader (121278)

      Exactly. And THAT is the real advancement in lecture-based education that technology permits. There's no reason to take notes at all if the information is available, and today it can be, with very little difficulty.

      And while not perfect (there is some potential for interaction lost) it also removes the need to be physically present for every lecture. I just finished fixing a server problem for one of my clients from home, didn't waste any gas, didn't waste any drive time, and now get to look at Slashdot

  • BULLSHIT.

    Pure, unadulterated bullshit.

    I'm sorry, taking notes longhand for me is an exercise in self torture. If I try (and I haven't tried since junior high school, I got a laptop in high school to end that stupidity) I have moderate to severe pain in my hand, unreadable notes, and no memory at all whatsoever of the lecture.

    With a laptop, I can reasonable notes, meaning a few key words or phrases to jog my memory of what the lecture was about. I don't bother with a word-for-word transcription, if I wante

  • It's not the actual notes that makes a big difference, but what you do with those notes. Most students just take notes and that is the extent of the usefulness of their notes. A much smaller number (I imagine) actually make use of those notes. I cannot count the number of times students come into office hours and, when asked if they refer to their notes, say "no." Regarding those who think LaTeX/TeX is a longer process than taking notes. I took notes on my laptop in grad school for almost all my classes. D

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