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Businesses The Almighty Buck

Qualcomm Set To Reject $130bn Bid From Broadcom (ft.com) 29

Tim Bradshaw, reporting for Financial Times: Chipmaker Broadcom officially unveiled a $130bn offer, including net debt, for Qualcomm on Monday, in what could be the largest tech deal in history. Under Broadcom's proposal, Qualcomm shareholders would receive $70 per share -- $60 in cash and $10 in shares of its rival. It would value Qualcomm's equity at roughly $103bn. Qualcomm is set to reject Broadcom's takeover offer (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; an alternative source wasn't immediately available), as the US chipmaker views its rival's $130bn proposal as too low and fraught with regulatory risks, people familiar with the matter said. The offer represents a 28 per cent premium over Qualcomm's share price on November 2, after it first emerged that Broadcom was preparing an offer. Broadcom also said that its offer stands whether or not Qualcomm completes its $38bn acquisition of NXP, which has yet to close.
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Qualcomm Set To Reject $130bn Bid From Broadcom

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  • This looks to be the non-paywalled Financial Times story:

    http://www.businessdayonline.c... [businessdayonline.com]

  • If the offer is truly the same regardless of whether or not the NXP deal closes, there is a huge incentive for that deal to fall through. If they're paying $130b regardless, it would make no sense for Qualcomm to go through with that deal -- it implies that Broadcom is effectively valuing NXP at $0 and giving Qualcomm's shareholders no value for that asset.
    • If the offer is truly the same regardless of whether or not the NXP deal closes, there is a huge incentive for that deal to fall through. If they're paying $130b regardless, it would make no sense for Qualcomm to go through with that deal -- it implies that Broadcom is effectively valuing NXP at $0 and giving Qualcomm's shareholders no value for that asset.

      No, it means Broadcom is valuing NXP at roughly the same as what Qualcomm will/may pay for it - so it's a wash.

    • I can't imagine some of the conversations about sourcing and confidentiality that some customers got to deal with through this whole fiasco.

      ITAR compliance isn't something that gets glossed over. For example the JSF uses Freescale MCUs. NXP is Dutch. But Broadcom and Qualcomm are American.

      We had one of our products rejected (at the request of a competitor) because some of the IP was available internationally.

  • by bill_mcgonigle ( 4333 ) * on Monday November 06, 2017 @12:17PM (#55499927) Homepage Journal

    With Qualcomm execs thinking they can extract percentages of device prices from manufacturers rather than just charging a fair price for a part, and their other aggressive and anti-competitive lawsuits they have going, shareholders should welcome new management before the company goes the way of SCO and Oracle/Java. We've heard Apple is already preparing to jump to Intel for radio silicon and others will rapidly follow, importantly and especially on the high end.

    And that's without being a fan of Broadcomm at all - they've been really bad with security, documentation, NDA's and support to the point of shooting themselves in the foot with selling their MIPS platform, etc. into the embedded linux space. I'm willing to bet that their move to Singapore will be good for the ecosystem though.

    • If the company goes the way of Oracle, I think the shareholders will be pretty happy but nobody else on the planet will.

    • Qualcomm appears to have made several mistakes with Apple.

      When the iPhone 4 first added CDMA capability and was released to Verizon/Sprint/U.S. Cellular, Qualcomm should have negotiated the per-device percentage for their modems, the FRAND for the GSM modems from Infineon that Apple was currently using, and any IP licensing on top of this. There should have been clauses in the agreement for new patents on each side that discouraged them from going to court.

      Qualcomm should never have licensed their source co

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